Advertisements

Healthy Mediterranean Cooking at Home

Tag Archives: Winter squash

visual-guide-winter-squash_612

These cooler days are a great time to cook with winter squash. Sweeter, denser and more firm in texture than summer squash or zucchini, winter squashes take well to a wide variety of recipes and can be delicious in soups, casseroles, risotto, lasagna and even desserts.

Winter squash are harvested in the fall and these hardy vegetables will keep well through the cold winter months for which they’re named. Sugar pumpkins, acorn squash, spaghetti and butternut squash are probably the most common types to find at your local supermarket. The other varieties are worth seeking out at farmers’ markets and specialty markets. Regardless of the type, select winter squash that are blemish and bruise free with an intact stem and a heavy feeling for their size.

Naturally low in fat and calories, winter squash provide significant nutritional benefits. For example, one cup of baked butternut squash contains vitamins A (from beta carotene), B6, C and E, as well as magnesium, potassium and manganese. Flavors are generally mild-to-sweet, so squash won’t overwhelm other ingredients and can easily be incorporated into seasonal recipes. The orange and yellow flesh helps brighten dishes, especially in the colder months, when variety and color can be hard to come by in seasonal produce. Don’t be discouraged by winter squash’s size and tough exterior and you can sometimes find popular varieties, like butternut, in stores already peeled and cubed. See my earlier post on tips for cutting up winter squash.

https://jovinacooksitalian.com/2012/11/26/how-do-i-cook-winter-squash/

See chart above for photos of each of the following winter squashes.

1. Kabocha Squash
Characteristics: The squat, green kabocha—the Japanese word for squash—has a nutty, earthy flavor with just a touch of sweetness. It’s similar in shape and size to a buttercup squash, but the base points out and not in.

2. Butternut Squash
Characteristics: A slim neck and bulbous bottom give the butternut squash its distinctive bell shape. The muted yellow-tan rind hides bright orange-yellow flesh with a slightly sweet taste. To make butternut squash easier to handle, cut the neck from the body and work with each section separately.

3. Red Kabocha Squash
Characteristics: The red kabocha is squat, like its green counterpart, and has faint white stripes running from top to bottom. While the green kabocha is savory, the red kabocha is sweeter.

4. Carnival Squash
Characteristics: Combine an acorn squash with a sweet dumpling squash and you get a carnival squash. While the carnival squash’s exterior resembles both of its relatives, its yellow flesh is mellow and sweet. Use it wherever acorn squash or butternut squash is called for in a recipe.

5. Sugar Pumpkin
Characteristics: Sugar pumpkins are prized for their classic pumpkin flavor, as well as for their thick and fleshy walls. If you’d like to opt out of canned pumpkin for your baking and make your own purée instead, use a sugar pumpkin.

6. Sweet Dumpling Squash
Characteristics: This whitish-yellow and green squash is small and compact, making the whole squash the perfect-size for an individual serving. The flesh tastes very much like a sweet potato and the skin is edible is as well. Use sweet dumpling squash in recipes calling for sweet potato or pumpkin.

7. Spaghetti Squash
Characteristics: Take a fork to the inside of a cooked spaghetti squash and you’ll understand how this squash got its name. If you’re in search of a healthy pasta alternative, try this very mild-tasting squash.

8. Blue Hubbard Squash
Characteristics: Most blue Hubbard squash are huge and bumpy and are often sold as pre-cut wedges. Some varieties, like the Blue Ballet, are smaller, making it easier to store and prepare at home. Underneath the gray-blue skin is sweet-tasting orange flesh.

9. Delicata Squash
Characteristics: This particular winter squash, with its pale yellow shading, most closely resembles its summer squash relatives. The thin skin is edible, but also more susceptible to bruises and rot. When cooked, the delicata has a consistency similar to that of a sweet potato—creamy and soft—although the flavoring is more earthy.

10. Red Kuri Squash
Characteristics: Like all Hubbards, the red kuri has an asymmetrical, lopsided look to it. However, the red kuri is smaller and easier to handle. Its yellow flesh is smooth and has a chestnut like flavor.

11. Buttercup Squash
Characteristics: Compact and green with paler green stripes, the buttercup can closely resemble a kabocha squash but it has a distinctive circular ridge on the bottom. On some, the ridge may surround a more pronounced bump, or “turban.” A freshly cut buttercup may smell like a cucumber, but once cooked, its orange flesh becomes dense.

12. Acorn Squash
Characteristics: This mild flavored squash is named for its acorn like shape. Choose one with a dull green rind; an acorn squash that’s turned orange will have tough and fibrous flesh.

(Adapted from Gourmet Magazine)

vegeta-porrusalda

Squash and Fish Chowder

Ingredients

  • 1 pound cod or white fish available in your area, cut into 1 inch pieces
  • 4 tablespoons olive oil
  • 6 leeks, white and pale green parts only, chopped in 1/2-inch sections
  • 4 cloves garlic, chopped or minced
  • 4 potatoes, chopped in 1-inch pieces
  • 1 medium carrot, chopped in 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1/2 pound winter squash, chopped in 1/2-inch pieces
  • 4-5 cups low sodium chicken broth or vegetable broth
  • Salt and pepper

Directions

Place a large pot over medium-high heat. Add olive oil and sauté leeks until they brown slightly, 10 to 15 minutes. Add garlic and sauté until they begin to take on a slight tan color, 1 to 2 minutes.

Add potatoes, carrot, squash and cod pieces. Immediately, pour in enough broth to cover and add 1 teaspoon salt and ½ teaspoon black pepper. Bring soup to a boil and reduce heat to a simmer. Cook, uncovered, for 15 to 25 minutes or until potatoes and squash are tender. Stir once or twice. Add salt and pepper, if needed.

51134000

Mediterranean Squash with Lemon Sauce

This dish goes very well with baked chicken.

ingredients

  • 1 small kabocha squash or large acorn squash (1 pound), scrubbed,
  • 1 1-pound delicata squash, scrubbed, cut into 1″-thick wedges or rings, seeded
  • 7 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano, divided
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 4 scallions, cut into 2″ pieces
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon tahini (sesame seed paste)
  • Aleppo pepper or crushed red pepper flakes

Directions

Arrange two racks in the upper third of the oven and preheat to 425°F.

Place kabocha on one rimmed baking sheet and delicata on a second sheet. Drizzle 3 tablespoons oil over the squash on both baking sheets and sprinkle each pan with a 1/2 teaspoon of dried oregano. Season squash with salt and pepper; toss. Roast for 15 minutes.

Combine 1 tablespoon oil and the scallions in a small bowl; season with salt and pepper and toss to coat. Scatter scallion mixture over the squash, dividing evenly between the two baking sheets, and continue to roast until squash is tender but not mushy, about 15 minutes longer (time may vary depending on squash).

Whisk lemon juice, tahini and 1 tablespoon water in a small bowl to blend. Gradually whisk in remaining 3 tablespoons oil. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Transfer squash to a serving platter. Drizzle sauce over the squash and sprinkle with Aleppo pepper.

Empanadas6

Sweet Squash Turnovers

Makes 24

Ingredients

Squash Filling

  • 4 lb squash, sugar pumpkin or any winter squash of choice
  • 2 cups water
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 4 whole cloves
  • 1 cup packed dark brown sugar

Pastry Dough

  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup shortening or butter
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon

Glaze

  • Egg white mixed with 1 tablespoon water
  • Cinnamon-sugar mixture (1 teaspoon ground cinnamon mixed with 1/4 cup sugar)

Directions

To make the filling:

Rinse off the exterior of the squash. Using a serrated knife cut the squash in half and scoop out the seeds. Scrape out the stringy layer (pulp) with a spoon. Discard seeds and pulp and cut into 4 inch slices leaving the skin on.

In a steamer or large pot, steam the squash over the 2 cups of water, making sure to keep the lid on tight, for 20 to 40 minutes, or until tender. Cool. Once cooled, scrape the flesh off the skins and into a mixing bowl. Discard the skins. Mash with a potato masher and strain the liquid in a colander into a bowl. Reserve the liquid and set squash puree aside.

In the same large pot, put the reserved liquid from the squash (you will have about about 1/2 to 2/3 cup) and the add cinnamon sticks and cloves. Bring liquid to a boil and then remove the pan from the heat. Replace the lid and let steep for 30 minutes.

Remove cinnamon and cloves and add the squash puree to the liquid. Add the brown sugar and over medium-low heat let it melt into the squash puree, stirring occasionally, so it will not burn or stick to the pot. Once the sugar has melted, lower the heat to low and let simmer uncovered until all the water evaporates. Remove from the heat and allow to cool down before refrigerating, about 15 minutes. Place in the refrigerator for 3 hours or overnight.

To make the pastry dough:

Mix the first 3 dry ingredients. Cut in the shortening and add the eggs, milk, sugar and cinnamon. Combine until you have a soft dough. Cut the dough in half, wrap each in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 30 minutes.

To make the turnovers:

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Place oven racks in the middle and upper third of the oven.

Take out half the dough and divide it into 12 equal balls of dough. Keep the remaining dough in the refrigerator until you are finished with the first half.

On a floured surface, roll out the dough balls into small round circles, about 4-5 inches. Place a tablespoon of filling on one half of each of the dough circles. Wet the bottom edges of the circles with water to help seal the two halves. Fold over the dough to cover the filling and seal the edges with a fork by pressing down along the edges. Repeat with remaining dough and filling.

Brush each turnover with egg white mixture, sprinkle with cinnamon and sugar mixture. Puncture the top of each turnover with a fork.

Spray a large cookie sheet with cooking spray, place turnovers on the cookie sheet and bake for 15 to 20 minutes on the middle rack in the oven. After 15 minutes move the cookie sheet to the top rack and continue to bake for the last 5 minutes, until golden brown. Follow the same procedure for the remaining turnovers.

20060615_0002

Squash and Hazelnut Lasagna

For the squash filling

  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 4 lb butternut squash or squash of choice, peeled, seeded and cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon white pepper
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 4 teaspoons chopped fresh sage
  • 1 cup hazelnuts (4 oz), toasted , loose skins rubbed off with a kitchen towel and chopped

For the sauce

  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 5 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 5 cups milk
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon white pepper

For assembling the lasagna

  • 1/2 lb mozzarella, coarsely grated (2 cups)
  • 1 cup finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano (3 oz)
  • 12 lasagna noodles, partially cooked

Directions

To make the filling:

Cook onion in butter in a deep 12-inch heavy skillet over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until golden, about 10 minutes. Add squash, garlic, salt and white pepper and cook, stirring occasionally, until squash is just tender, about 15 minutes. Remove from the heat and stir in parsley, sage and nuts. Cool filling.

To make the sauce:

Cook garlic in butter in a 3-quart heavy saucepan over moderately low heat, stirring, 1 minute. Whisk in flour and cook mixture, whisking, for 3 minutes. Add milk in a steady stream, whisking. Add bay leaf and bring to a boil, whisking constantly, then reduce heat and simmer, whisking occasionally, for 10 minutes. Whisk in salt and white pepper and remove from heat. Discard bay leaf. (Cover surface of the sauce with wax paper, if not using immediately.)

To assemble the lasagna:

Preheat the oven to 425°F.

Cook lasagna noodles in boiling salted water, about 6 minutes. Drain and place on kitchen towels, so they do not stick together.

Mix cheeses together. Spread 1/2 cup of the sauce in a buttered 13x9x2 inch glass baking dish (or other shallow 3-quart baking dish) and cover the sauce with 3 pasta sheets, leaving spaces between the sheets. Spread with 2/3 cup sauce and one-third of the filling, then sprinkle with a 1/2 cup cheese. Repeat layering 2 more times, beginning with pasta sheets and ending with cheese. Top with remaining 3 pasta sheets, remaining sauce and remaining cheese.

Tightly cover baking dish with buttered heavy-duty foil and bake the lasagna in the middle of the for oven 30 minutes. Remove foil and bake until golden and bubbling, 10 to 15 minutes more. Let lasagna stand 20 minutes before serving.

239812

Kabocha Squash Mini-Cakes

Cakes:

  • 2 cups 3/4-inch cubes peeled seeded kabocha squash (from one 3-pound squash)
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 1 vanilla bean, split lengthwise
  • Nonstick vegetable oil spray
  • 2/3 cup (packed) golden brown sugar
  • 6 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/4 cup mild-flavored beer
  • 1 large egg
  • 3/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

Topping

  • 2 cups vanilla flavored Greek yogurt
  • 1/3 cup (packed) light brown sugar

Directions:

Combine squash and milk in a heavy small saucepan. Scrape in seeds from the vanilla bean; add the bean pod. Bring to simmer over medium heat. Partially cover, reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer until squash is very tender, about 20 minutes. Remove vanilla bean pod. Drain squash. Place in a processor and blend until smooth.

Preheat the oven to 375°F. Spray six 3/4 cup ramekins with nonstick spray. Place 1/2 cup squash puree in large bowl (reserve remaining puree for another baking use). Add sugar, oil, beer and egg to puree and beat to blend. Sift flour, cinnamon, baking soda and salt over; beat to blend. Divide batter among prepared ramekins.

Bake cakes until tester inserted into center comes out clean, about 18 minutes. Cool cakes in ramekins. Turn out onto serving plates.

Topping: Combine yogurt and brown sugar. Serve with the mini-cakes.

 

Advertisements

 

From breakfast to dinner, squash can find a place on the menu.

Currently, the supermarket produce bins contain many types of squash: kabocha, butternut, Hubbard, acorn, delicata, turban, and spaghetti, to name just a few. How many of you walk right past the winter squash bin saying, “I don’t know what to do with that,” or “ Way too much work ! ” You are missing a great tasting vegetable and one that is extremely good for you. They are low in calories and high in vitamin A, vitamin C, potassium, dietary fiber and manganese, folate, omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin B1, copper, vitamin B6, niacin and pantothenic acid.

The big winter squashes can be daunting if you don’t have a heavy-duty chef’s knife. The skin on a kabocha, while thick, is not particularly hard. Use a large knife to cut off big slices, which can be roasted without peeling for some recipes or peeled and cut into dice for others. If you need to dice the squash, cut off a big slice first, then cut that slice into manageable pieces. You can then cut it into thin slices, peel, and dice.  

The following is a basic guideline on preparing all winter squash varieties. When choosing winter squash, look for ones that are heavy for their size and have a hard, deep-colored rind, free of blemishes. Another advantage to winter squash having such a thick skin is that they can be stored for longer than summer squash and do not require refrigeration.

How to Cook Winter Squash

(1 lb squash yields approximately 1 cup cooked)

1 or more whole winter squash

Preheat oven to 400˚F.

Wash squash under running water and dry. Using a sharp knife or fork, pierce several holes in the top of the squash near stem; you don’t have to worry about pricking it all over.

Place squash in a pan, not on a cookie sheet, because as it cooks, it may collapse and its natural water will seep out. Bake in the oven for 45 minutes. Smaller winter squash will be soft and visibly done, but depending on the size, it may take up to 2 hours for an 8 lb. squash.

After removing it from the oven, allow the squash to sit and cool completely. Then cut it in half and scoop out the seeds and stringy fibrous flesh that surrounds the hollow core. Use immediately or store in the refrigerator.

Cooking Ideas

• Purée in food processor with light coconut milk, curry, and freshly minced and sautéed ginger and garlic.

• Add brown sugar, vanilla extract, and toasted walnuts.

• Add maple syrup and toasted almonds.

• Serve mashed with salt and pepper and a touch of real butter.

• Mix with prepared pesto and sprinkle with Parmesan or Pecorino Romano cheese.

You can use either butternut or kabocha squash in the recipes below, although, the two are not identical in texture or flavor. Butternut is a denser, slightly sweeter squash, and kabocha has an earthier flavor. Kabocha squash absorbs flavors and is especially well suited for salads because of the way it absorbs tart dressings.

BreakfastButternut Squash Muffins, Diabetic. Photo by brokenburner

Winter Squash and Molasses Muffins

Ingredients:

  • 2 pounds winter squash, such as butternut, cut in large chunks
  • 1 cup whole-wheat pastry flour
  • 1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1/3 cup packed light brown sugar
  • 1/3 cup blackstrap molasses
  • 1/4 cup canola oil
  • 1/2 cup buttermilk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup walnuts

Directions:

1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Line a sheet pan with foil and lightly oil the foil. Brush the squash with a small amount of oil. Place on the baking sheet skin side down. Roast for 20 minutes and use tongs to turn the pieces of squash over. Roast for 20 to 30 minutes more, until the squash is soft enough that you can pierce the skin with the tip of a paring knife. Remove from the heat and allow to cool, then peel away the skin. Purée in a food processor or use an immersion hand blender. You should have about 1 cup of purée.

2. Turn the oven down to 375 degrees F.  Oil or butter muffin tins or use muffin cup liners, if desired.

3. Sift together the flours, baking soda, cinnamon, nutmeg, ground cloves, allspice, and salt.

4. Beat together the eggs and sugar. Beat in the molasses, oil, buttermilk, puréed squash, and vanilla. Quickly beat in the flour and fold in the walnuts.

5. Spoon into the muffin tins and place in the oven. Bake 20 to 22 minutes, until the muffins have risen and a tester comes out clean. Let the muffins cool in the tins for 15 minutes, then turn out onto a rack to cool completely.

Yield: 1 dozen large muffins.

AppetizerPicture of Curried Butternut Squash Soup Recipe

Winter Squash Soup With Ginger

Ingredients:

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 carrot, diced
  • 2 pounds peeled winter squash, like butternut or kabocha
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 tablespoon minced or grated ginger
  • 6 1/2 cups chicken broth or vegetable broth
  • 1/3 cup rice
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • Pinch of freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1/2 of a lime
  • 4 to 6 tablespoons plain yogurt

Directions:

1. Heat the oil over medium heat in a large, heavy soup pot or Dutch oven and add the onion and carrot. Cook, stirring, until the vegetables are tender, about 5 minutes. Add the squash, garlic and minced ginger and cook, stirring, until the mixture smells fragrant, about 1 minute.

2. Add the broth, the rice and salt to taste and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat, cover and simmer 45 minutes to 1 hour, until the squash is very tender.

3. Using a hand blender, or in batches in a regular blender, purée the soup. If using a regular blender, cover the top with a towel pulled down tight, rather than airtight with the lid. Return to the pot and heat through. Adjust seasoning with salt and pepper. If desired, thin out with a little more broth.

4. Ladle the soup into bowls and add a tablespoon of yogurt, then slowly swirl the yogurt into the soup with a spoon. Squeeze a few drops of lime juice onto each serving and sprinkle with a dash of nutmeg.

Yield: 4 to 6 servings

Advance preparation: The soup will hold for several hours, in or out of the refrigerator. Proceed with Step 4 just before serving.

Lunch

Wild Rice with Butternut Squash, Leeks, and Corn

Roasted Winter Squash and Wild Rice Salad

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup wild rice
  • 3 1/2 cups chicken or vegetable broth
  • Salt to taste
  • 2 pounds butternut squash, peeled and cut in small dice (about 3 cups peeled and diced, weighing 1 1/2 to 1 3/4 pounds)
  • Salt to taste
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 1 garlic clove, minced or puréed
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 3 tablespoons walnut oil or substitute extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh herbs, like parsley, chives, tarragon
  • 1/2 cup diced celery
  • 6-ounce bag baby arugula or spinach

Directions:

1. Rinse the wild rice. Bring the water or stock to a boil in a medium saucepan, add salt to taste and the rice. Bring back to a boil, reduce the heat, cover and simmer 45 minutes, until the rice is tender and has begun to splay. Drain through a strainer, return to the pot and cover the pot with a clean dishtowel. Return the lid to the pot and let sit for 10 minutes.

2. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with foil. Place the squash in a bowl or directly on the baking sheet and toss with salt to taste, the balsamic vinegar and 1 tablespoon of the olive oil. Spread on the baking sheet in an even layer and make sure to tip all of the liquid remaining in the bowl over the squash. Roast for 20 to 30 minutes, stirring every 10 minutes so that the squash browns evenly. The squash should be tender all the way through. Remove from the heat.

3. In a small bowl or measuring cup, whisk together the lemon juice, garlic, salt to taste and mustard. Whisk in the remaining olive oil and the walnut oil.

4. Combine the wild rice, squash, herbs and celery in a large bowl. Toss with the dressing. Add salt and pepper to taste. Line a platter, individual plates or a wide salad bowl with the baby spinach or arugula. Top with the salad and serve.

Yield: 6 servings.

Advance preparation: This salad holds well for a couple of days in the refrigerator, without the arugula or spinach.

Side Dish

Roasted Beet and Winter Squash Salad

 

Ingredients:

  • 2 pounds kabocha squash
  • 1 bunch beets
  • 2 tablespoons red wine or sherry vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1 small garlic clove, minced or put through a press
  • 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons walnut oil
  • 3 tablespoons chopped walnuts (about 1 1/2 ounces)
  • 2 tablespoons mixed chopped fresh herbs, like parsley, mint, tarragon, chives

Directions:

1.Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Cut the greens off of the beets and reserve for another use, leaving about 1/2 inch of the stems attached. Scrub the beets and place in a baking dish or ovenproof casserole. Add about 1/4 inch water to the dish. Cover tightly with a lid or foil, and bake 35 to 40 minutes, or until the beets are tender. Remove from the oven and allow to cool. If not using right away, refrigerate in a covered bowl.

2. Line another roasting pan with foil or parchment and brush with olive oil. Peel the squash and cut in 1/2-inch thick slices. Toss with 2 teaspoons of the olive oil and salt to taste and place on the baking sheet. Roast for 20 to 30 minutes, turning halfway through, until lightly browned and tender. You can do this at the same time that you roast the beets, but watch carefully if you need to put the baking sheet on a lower shelf. Remove from the heat and allow to cool.

3. Mix together the vinegars, garlic, salt, pepper, the remaining olive oil and the walnut oil. When the beets are cool enough to handle, trim the ends off, slip off their skins, cut in half, then slice into half-moon shapes. Toss with half the salad dressing. In a separate bowl, toss the roasted squash with the remaining dressing.

4. Arrange the beets and squash in alternating rows in the middle of the platter. Sprinkle on the fresh herbs and the walnuts. If desired, add crumbled feta. 

Yield: 6 servings.

Advance preparation: Roasted beets and squash will keep for 4 to 5 days in the refrigerator.

 

Dinner

Lasagna With Roasted Winter Squash

Ingredients:

  • 3 pounds kabocha squash
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons minced shallot or onion
  • 3 tablespoons sifted all-purpose flour (Use Wondra for instant mixing)
  • 3 cups low-fat milk 
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • Pinch of freshly grated nutmeg
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh sage
  • 1/2 pound no-boil lasagna noodles (or a little more, depending on the size of your lasagna pan)
  • 4 ounces Parmesan cheese, grated (1 cup)

Directions:

1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with foil. Cut the squash into big chunks, brush the exposed flesh with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil and place on the baking sheet. Bake 45 minutes or until squash is tender enough to be pierced through to the skin with a paring knife. Remove from the heat and allow to cool until you can handle it, then cut away the skin and cut into thin slices. Turn the oven down to 350 degrees F.

2. While the squash is in the oven, make the béchamel. Heat the remaining oil over medium heat in a heavy medium saucepan. Add the shallot or onion and cook, stirring, until it has softened, about 3 minutes. Whisk the Wondra flour and the milk together and slowly pour into the pan with the shallot. Whisk and bring to a simmer. Cook, whisking all the while until the mixture begins to thicken. Turn the heat to very low and simmer, stirring often with a whisk and scraping the bottom and edges of the pan with a rubber spatula, for 10 to 15 minutes, until the sauce is thick. Season with salt, pepper and nutmeg. Remove from heat and stir in 1/4 cup of the Parmesan and 1 tablespoon of the sage.

3. Oil a rectangular baking dish. Spread a spoonful of béchamel over the bottom. Top with a layer of lasagna noodles. Spread a thin layer of the béchamel over the noodles. Top with half the squash. Season the squash with salt and pepper and sprinkle with Parmesan. Repeat the layers, ending with a layer of lasagna noodles topped with béchamel and Parmesan. Sprinkle the remaining sage over the top. Make sure the noodles are well coated with béchamel so they will soften during baking.

4. Cover the baking dish tightly with foil and place in the oven. Bake 40 minutes, until the noodles are tender and the mixture is bubbling. Uncover and bake another 5 to 10 minutes until the top begins to brown. Remove from the heat and allow to sit for 5 minutes before serving.

Yield: 6 to 8 servings.

Advance preparation: You can assemble this dish up to a day ahead and refrigerate, or freeze for a month. The lasagna can be baked several hours ahead and reheated in a medium oven.


When my children were young they loved pasta, as long as it was smothered in tomato sauce. It was a not a good dinner, in their estimation, if I added a vegetable or two. For this reason, I developed a marinara sauce with the addition of finely chopped vegetables, which has been a success in our family for many, many years. In fact, now that my children are grown, they make the sauce the same way. They are also more sophisticated as adults and enjoy the vast possibilities pasta can offer, even when they include vegetables.

Even though summer has past with its bounty of fruits and vegetables, there are still plenty of options for cooler days. Adding vegetables to pasta doesn’t have to be complicated or follow a rigid guideline. Don’t be afraid to experiment with your favorite pasta dish, even if the recipe doesn’t call specifically for vegetables. Try adding a vegetable you like to the dish, and see if they work well together.

What can you find at the fall Farmers’ Market?

Winter Squash One fall’s favorite vegetable, acorn squash, can be seen on seasonal menus across the country. Whether simply roasted with butter and sage or tossed with ricotta as a ravioli filling, acorn squash is versatile and simple to prepare, but has a limited season from October to December. Two other popular winter squashes include: spaghetti squash, a small, watermelon-shaped variety with a golden-yellow, oval rind and a mild, nut-like flavor and butternut squash with a soft inner flesh that tastes somewhat similar to sweet potatoes.

Brussels Sprouts, a diminutive member of the cabbage family, is available from late September through mid-February. Brussels sprouts hold up to almost any preparation, from oven roasting to braising and blanching.

Eggplant is a transitional berry (that’s right — it’s not actually a vegetable or even a fruit), and like most berries, peaks toward the end of summer and begins to decline in the fall. Look for firm eggplants with a shiny skin.

Carrots have long been considered a “cool weather” vegetable and are generally best in the late fall and early spring. Once thought of as a humble side dish, carrots have come into their own in recent years and are now widely available in their various natural hues, including red, purple, yellow and white.

Sweet potatoes are actually available year round, but are best in November and December. Sweet potatoes work well in both sweet and savory preparations, from mashed sweet potato to sweet potato pie. Not to be confused with yams, most sweet potatoes in the United States are characteristically orange, but can still be found in white and yellow varieties throughout the deep South.

Cauliflower may be grown, harvested, and sold year-round, but it is by nature a cool weather crop and at its best in fall and winter and into early spring.

Cabbage is more than just the base for your backyard-barbecue coleslaw. It adds texture to a tossed salad, makes a great topping for your taco and, when sautéed with apples and bacon, is the perfect accompaniment to roast pork.

Broccoli like many cruciferous vegetables, can be grown year-round in temperate climates, so we’ve forgotten it even has a season. But, like the rest of its family, it tastes best when harvested in the cooler temperatures of fall in most climates. Broccoli rabe (rapine) is a more bitter, leafier vegetable than its cousin, broccoli, but likes similar cool growing conditions.

Fennel‘s natural season is from fall through early spring. Like most cool weather crops, the plant bolts and turns bitter in warmer weather.

Winter Greens:  swiss chard has more substance than spinach and kale, like all hearty cooking greens, are less bitter in the cooler weather.

Mushrooms, while most mushrooms are available year-round, many are at their peak in fall and winter. The produce aisle routinely offers white button, portobello and, their younger sibling, cremini (also sold as “baby bellas”), oyster and shiitake mushrooms.

Try these vegetable based pasta dishes for a change of pace.

Bucatini with Mushroom and Roasted Tomato Sauce

Ingredients:

  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil, plus some for drizzling
  • 4 large garlic cloves, peeled and then thinly sliced
  • 2 pints grape or cherry tomatoes
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 pound crimini mushrooms, stemmed and quartered
  • 1/2 pound shiitake mushrooms, stemmed and quartered
  • 1/2 pound button mushrooms, stemmed and quartered
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped shallots
  • 4 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 1/2 cup white wine
  • Flat-leaf parsley
  • 3/4 cup grated Pecorino Romano
  • 8 ounces uncooked bucatini

 Directions:

Preheat oven 425 degrees F.

Place a large skillet on the stove top with the extra-virgin olive oil and the sliced garlic, spread out the garlic so it is in an even layer in the oil. Slowly brown the garlic stirring until golden all over, 4 to 5 minutes.

Place the tomatoes on a cookie sheet and pour garlic and olive oil from the skillet over the tomatoes. Season with some salt and pepper. Place in the oven and roast for 8 to 10 minutes or until the tomatoes start to burst.

Bring a large pot of water to boil, salt and cook bucatini according to package directions. Drain pasta.

In the same skillet that was used to brown the garlic, add the mushrooms and shallots. Let them cook for about 4 minutes, then add the thyme sprigs and season with some freshly ground black pepper, continue to cook for another 5 minutes stirring a few times. Add the white wine and cook until it has almost completely evaporated. Salt to taste and stir to combine.

Remove the stems of thyme and add the roasted tomatoes with their cooking juices from the baking sheet and the parsley and stir to combine. Add cooked pasta,mix well and garnish with cheese.

Pappardelle With Greens and Ricotta

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound greens, such as swiss chard, kale or broccoli rabe, stemmed and washed well
  • Salt
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 to 2 garlic cloves, to taste, minced
  • 3/4 cup skim ricotta cheese
  • 3/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan
  • 3/4 pound pappardelle or fettuccine

Directions:

Bring a large pot of water to a boil. When the water comes to a boil, salt generously and add the greens (you may have to do this in two batches). After the water returns to a boil, boil two to four minutes until the greens are tender. Using a deep-fry skimmer or slotted spoon, transfer the wilted greens to a bowl. Do not drain the hot water in the pot, as you’ll use it to cook the pasta. Cut the greens while in the bowl into bite size pieces. ( I like to use kitchen scissors for this.)

Heat the oil over medium heat in a large, heavy nonstick skillet. Add the garlic, cook for about a minute just until fragrant, and stir in the greens. Toss in the hot pan for about a minute, just until the greens are lightly coated with oil and fragrant with garlic. Season with salt and pepper, and remove from the heat.

Place the ricotta in a large pasta bowl. Bring the greens cooking water in the large pot back to a boil, and add the pappardelle. Cook al dente. Ladle 1/2 cup of the cooking water from the pasta into the ricotta and stir together. Drain the pasta, and toss with the ricotta, greens and cheese.

Roasted Butternut Squash Pasta

Ingredients:

  • 3/4 teaspoon salt, divided
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 cups (1-inch) cubed peeled butternut squash
  • Cooking spray
  • 4 ounces pancetta, cut into 1/4-inch dice
  • 1 cup thinly sliced red onion
  • 8 ounces uncooked tube-shaped pasta
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour (Wondra dissolves instantly)
  • 2 cups reduced-fat milk
  • 3/4 cup (3 ounces) shredded Italian Fontina cheese
  • 1/3 cup (1 1/2 ounces) grated fresh Parmesan cheese

Directions:

Preheat oven to 425°F.

Combine 1/4 teaspoon salt, rosemary, and pepper. Place squash on a foil-lined baking sheet coated with cooking spray; sprinkle with salt mixture. Bake at 425°F for 45 minutes or until tender and lightly browned. Increase oven temperature to 450° F.

Cook the pancetta in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat until crisp. Add onions and sauté 8 minutes or until tender. Stir in roasted squash. Remove to a bowl and cover while pasta cooks.

Cook pasta according to the package directions. Drain well.

In empty skillet used to cook pancetta and squash combine flour, 1/2 teaspoon salt and milk, stirring constantly with a whisk. Turn on heat and bring to a boil over medium high heat. Cook 1 minute or until slightly thick, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Add fontina cheese, stirring until cheese melts. Add pasta to cheese mixture, tossing well to combine. Spoon pasta mixture into an 11 x 7-inch baking dish lightly coated with cooking spray; top with squash mixture. Sprinkle evenly with Parmesan cheese. Bake at 450°F for 10 minutes or until cheese melts and begins to brown.


Where would Italian cuisine be without America? Strange as it might sound, just imagine how astonishingly different Italian food would be without tomatoes to make pasta sauces or corn for creamy polenta. Think of the gastronomic delights we would be missing! Take zucchini, a type of squash. They’ve become so intertwined with Italian cooking and culture, that Americans even call them by their Italian name –– although they originated on this side of the globe. In fact, just like tomatoes and corn, squash of all shapes and sizes were yet another culinary gift from the new world. Part of the large cucurbitaceae family –– which includes everything from pumpkins and winter squash to zucchini, melons, and cucumbers –– are said to have originated in the South American Andes and were grown in several parts of the American continent well before Columbus ever set foot on it. So, it doesn’t come as much of a surprise that here in the U.S. the fall season is associated with pumpkins and winter squash. Yet, most of us have a rather superficial acquaintance with them, often limited to the Halloween Jack-o-Lantern, a few pretty ornamentals, lots of pumpkin pie, and the occasional squash soup. But try walking through a farmers market these days, and you’ll be hit by an astounding assortment of squash of all colors and forms, from traditional orange pumpkins to smaller delicata and butternut squash to big hubbards.  What other food can be mashed to make comforting soups and delicate purées, stuffed into ravioli, used in a flavorful risotto or hollowed out to look like a scary skull lit from within by a candle?

Although called “winter” squash, these fruits really start appearing in late summer and keep growing through December –– some kinds grow even further into the winter. Unlike summer squash,  such as zucchini or yellow squash, which are harvested and eaten in the immature stages when the rind is still soft, winter squash are harvested when the fruit is fully mature and the rind is hard. Yes, I said fruit. All squash are botanically fruits. But can be used as a fruit or a vegetable. If you’re a squash newcomer whose experience is confined to pumpkin pie topped with whipped cream, start out with a butternut or a delicata squash and you won’t be disappointed. Butternut squash are light beige with a peanut-like shape, and they taste somewhat like sweet potatoes. Delicata squash are smaller and narrower, their rind is usually yellow with a few green streaks and the flavor is delicate.

Other culinary favorites include acorn squash, a round globe, with even groves around the entire squash. They are mostly dark green, with occasional splotches of orange and yellow, that make a hearty soup; hubbard, a large, bumpy and thick-skinned squash with a fairly sweet flavor; kabocha, a drier, flakier type with a round shape and a flattened top, green in color with occasional white stripes; and spaghetti squash, which has nothing to do with the pasta, but is so called because its flesh is stringy and turns into strands that resemble spaghetti when cooked. Native Americans once believed squash was so nutritious that they buried it along with the dead to provide them nourishment on their final journey. Squash were originally grown for the seeds because they were believed to increase fertility; however, with the evolution of squash, plants produced fruit that had a thicker skin, fewer seeds and less waste.

Red Kuri

The hard-shelled squash species are uniquely American. The earliest natives revered them, and gave them the honor of being one of the “Three Sisters”.  Beans and corn completed the trio, and without those foods for sustenance, many ancient peoples would have ceased to exist. The Three Sisters were vital to many civilizations. The corn and the beans made a complete protein, the squash supplied beta carotene, Omega 3 and Potassium. Whole communities could survive on these alone, if game and other foods were scarce. They were also one of the first companion plantings, each contributing to the growth and well-being of the others. The corn supplied support for the beans to climb on, and shade for the squash plants during the heat of the day. The squash plants large leaves shaded the ground, prevented weeds, and deterred hungry wildlife that didn’t like to walk through the fuzzy vines. The beans fixed nitrogen in the soil to feed the corn and the squash. The European conquerors carried the squash back across the Atlantic, and many varieties were created around the Mediterranean Basin. Winter squash never caught on in the more northern parts of Europe though, as the climate was too cool, and the season did not last long enough to properly grow them. France, Spain and Italy are European countries which have embraced the squash, and raised its cultivation to an art form with many unique varieties springing from that area. Wonderful varieties have been developed in Australia also, as the climate there is quite hospitable to raising winter squash. Although types of gourds were found in tombs of Egypt, the butternut squash and its family members including the pumpkin and the calabaza are new world, native Americans. The butternut is the new kid on the block having made its appearance in 1944. Most people ask what the difference is between a winter squash and a pumpkin. A pumpkin is just another hard-shelled winter squash. What makes  winter squash different from a summer squash? It’s simply the time of year in which they are eaten. The early American settlers gave them those designations. Summer squash are soft-skinned vegetables which grew quickly, and were eaten soon after harvest. Winter squash grew the thick, hard rinds that made them suitable for storing through the long winters when fresh vegetables were a precious commodity.

From Acorn Squash to Cinderella Pumpkins - Types of Winter Squash

Acorn

Winter squash comes in many shapes, sizes, textures and flavors. Chances are, there will be one variety out there that will suit your family. Here are a few popular ones. The ‘Waltham Butternut’ is a smooth-skinned squash with a meaty texture. It is prolific and easy to grow. It keeps well in a cool, dark storage area, and it’s small enough that 1 squash will feed an average family. The ‘Blue Hubbard‘ is a huge, heavy squash that requires more than just a paring knife to open it. The thick rind needs a small hatchet or saw to cut it open, but it will keep well into spring with nothing much more than a dry, cool spot. Not for the ‘Squash Novice’ as it occasionally will reach over 30 pounds, and 1 squash feeds a small army. The flesh is smooth and not stringy, somewhat on the dry side, but quite pleasing. ‘Carnival’ is a variety of acorn squash found in many supermarkets, and is a great selection for a two person meal. Use the squash as the main meal instead of meat, stuffing the halves with a seasoned rice mixture. Each person being served their own personal, edible bowl. For a simple side dish, simply drizzle with butter and brown sugar before baking.  BUYING The rind should be firm and unbroken with a uniform matte coloring. Squash should feel heavy for their size (indicating a high moisture content – squash gradually lose water after harvesting). Bigger squash generally have a more highly developed flavor. STORING Squash are amongst the longest keeping vegetables. In a cool (not refrigerator-cold), dry, well-ventilated place they can keep for three months or more. At room temperature, or in the refrigerator, they will deteriorate more quickly, but should be fine for at least a couple of weeks.  PREPARATION The hard rind, dense flesh and awkward shape mean that squash require careful cutting. Use a large knife or cleaver to make a shallow cut down the length of the squash (curves permitting). Place the blade in the cut and knock the back of the blade (using your hand, a wooden mallet or rolling pin) until the squash is cut in half lengthways. Scoop out the seeds and any fibrous-strings . If you require chunks of squash, cut a small piece off each end, enabling you to stand it vertically and trim off the rind before slicing and dicing. Squash should be cooked until tender. Baking a halved squash is an excellent way of preserving and intensifying its flavors. Cubes can also be added to casseroles. Boiling is quicker than baking but will result in some sugars being absorbed into the water and so is best used for dishes (such as soups) where the flavored water forms part of the dish rather than being discarded. Save the Seeds! The seeds of winter squash are delicious when toasted. Rinse them well and pat dry. Toss them lightly in oil and a little salt, spread them on a sheet pan, and bake at 250 degrees for about 1 hour. If you’d like to brown the seeds slightly, turn on the broiler for the last 4-5 minutes of baking. Let cool and store in a sealable bag or jar with a lid. Not only do they taste great, they’re nutritious and good for you!

Winter Squash Polenta

Makes about 4 cups ROAST SQUASH

  • 3 pounds winter squash
  • Olive oil
  • Salt & pepper

Set oven to 400 degrees F. Carefully cut the squash in half either lengthwise or crosswise. Scoop out the seeds and rub olive oil on the flesh, season with salt and pepper, then place cut-side down on a baking sheet. Place in the oven and roast until a knife easily inserts into the thickest part of the flesh, for about an hour. Let cool a bit. Scoop out the flesh and mash with a potato masher or a fork. POLENTA

  • 2 cups water
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 cup coarse stone-ground cornmeal
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter or Smart Balance Blend
  • 8 ounces grated fresh Parmesan, divided
  • Salt & pepper

Bring the water to a boil in a medium nonstick saucepan on medium heat. Stir in the salt. Slowly stir in the cornmeal with a whisk. Reduce heat to medium low, cover and set timer for 5 minutes. When timer goes off, check to see if it’s cooking at a slow simmer, adjust heat accordingly and whisk gently for a minute. Repeat every 5 minutes, adjusting temperature and whisking. When it thickens, uncover and stir for 2 – 3 minutes. Stir in the butter and three quarters of the Parmesan and stir until melted. Stir in the cooked squash and combine well. Taste and adjust seasonings. BAKING Transfer to a greased baking dish. [If you’re cooking ahead, stop here and refrigerate. Return to room temperature.] Top with reserved Parmesan. Bake at 350 degrees F. for 60 minutes. Top with oven roasted vegetables or Italian tomato meat sauce.

Butternut Squash Risotto

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups homemade or low-salt chicken broth; more as needed
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 ounces pancetta, diced
  • 10 large fresh sage leaves
  • 2 medium shallots, minced (about 1/4 cup)
  • 2 cups 1/4-inch-diced peeled butternut squash
  • 1-1/2 cups Arborio or other risotto rice
  • 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmigiano Reggiano
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Directions: Combine the chicken broth and wine in a small saucepan and set over medium heat. In a medium (3-qt.) saucepan, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the sage leaves and cook, turning once, until they’ve turned dark green in most places, about 1 minute total. Don’t brown. With a fork, transfer to a plate lined with paper towels to drain. Put the pancetta in the saucepan and cook, stirring occasionally, until nicely browned, 5 to 7 minutes and transfer to the plate with the sage. Add the shallots to the saucepan and cook, stirring with a wooden spoon, until softened, about 1 minute. Add the squash and rice and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Ladle in enough of the hot broth mixture to just cover the rice. Cook, stirring frequently, until the broth is mostly absorbed. Add another ladle of broth and continue cooking, stirring, and adding more ladles of broth as the previous additions are absorbed, until the rice is tender with just a slight bite, about 25 minutes. As the risotto cooks, adjust the heat so that it bubbles gently. The broth mixture needn’t be boiling; it should just be hot. If you use all the broth and wine before the rice gets tender, use more broth but not more wine. Set aside 4-6 sage leaves as a garnish (1 leaf per serving). Crumble the pancetta and the remaining sage leaves into the risotto. Stir in the Parmigiano. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Garnish each serving with a sage leaf. Serves six as a primo (first) course, or four as a second course.

 

Spaghetti Squash Casserole

Ingredients:

  • 1 spaghetti squash, halved lengthwise and seeds removed
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon dried basil
  • 1 cup (8 ounces) skim ricotta cheese
  • 1/2 cup (2 ounces) shredded low-fat mozzarella cheese
  • 1/4 cup chopped parsley
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 cup (1 ounce) grated Parmesan cheese
  • 3 tablespoons seasoned dry bread crumbs

Directions: Preheat the oven to 400°F. Coat a 13″ x 9″ baking dish and a baking sheet with nonstick spray. Place the squash, cut side down, on the sheet. Bake for 30 minutes, or until tender when pierced with a sharp knife. With a fork, scrape the squash strands into a large bowl. 

Meanwhile, warm the oil in a medium skillet set over medium heat. Add the onion, garlic, and basil. Cook for 4 to 5 minutes, or until the onion is soft. Cook for 3 to 4 minutes, or until the mixture is dry. To the bowl with the squash, add the ricotta cheese, mozzarella, parsley, salt, and the onion mixture. Stir to mix. Pour into the prepared baking dish. Sprinkle with the Parmesan and bread crumbs. Bake for 30 minutes, or until bubbly, heated through and the top is brown.

Winter Squash Gratin

Ingredients:

  • 2 medium butternut squash (or any winter squash of choice) (1 1/2 pounds each)
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 1 medium leek, white part only, coarsely chopped (1/2 cup)
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • 1/2 cup low-sodium chicken broth
  • One 12-ounce can evaporated skim milk
  • 1/2 teaspoon honey
  • 2 ounces of a baguette (thinly cut into 8 small slices) or 2 slices peasant bread (cut into 4 equal pieces), toasted
  • 4 ounces Italian Fontina cheese, shredded (about 1 cup)
  • 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon grated Parmesan cheese
  • 8 basil leaves, shredded

Directions: Preheat the oven to 400°F. Halve the squash lengthwise and remove the seeds. Place the squash, cut side up, in a baking pan. Season with 1/2 teaspoon each of the salt and pepper and cover tightly with foil. Bake for about 1 hour, until the squash are tender but not mushy. Let cool slightly. Meanwhile, in a medium saucepan, combine the leek, olive oil and 2 teaspoons of water. Cover and cook over moderately low heat until the leek is soft and translucent, about 5 minutes. Uncover and stir in the wine. Increase the heat to high and boil until the liquid is reduced to approximately 3 tablespoons, about 3 minutes. Stir in the broth, milk, honey and remaining 1/4 teaspoon each salt and pepper. Remove from the heat. Using a big spoon, scoop the flesh from the squash in large pieces. Place in a medium bowl. To assemble the gratin, preheat the oven to 400°F. Bring the leek mixture to a boil. Spoon half of the squash into a 6- to 8-cup casserole. Ladle half of the leek mixture over the top and cover with half of the toast and half of the Fontina. Repeat the layers with the remaining squash, leek mixture, toast and Fontina. Sprinkle the Parmesan cheese over the top. Bake the gratin for 30 minutes, or until the top is browned and bubbly. Garnish with the basil and serve. MAKE AHEAD: The recipe can be prepared through Step Three up to 3 hours ahead. Return to room temperature before baking.

Baked Winter Squash With Italian Sausage Stuffing

Servings: 8 Ingredients

  • 4 large acorn squash or squash of choice, about 1 pound each, cut in half, seeds removed
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • Salt, to taste
  • Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1/2 pound Italian sausage ( turkey, pork, chicken or vegetarian), casings removed and diced ( 1/4-inch)
  • 1 medium yellow onion, finely chopped,
  • 3/4 cup green bell pepper, finely chopped
  • 2 plum tomatoes, diced
  • 1 tablespoon garlic, minced
  • 4 cups Italian bread cubes
  • 1/2 cup chicken stock
  • 1/4 pound shredded Mozzarella cheese
  • 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1 tablespoon fresh parsley, finely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon dried sage
  • 1/4 cup egg substitute or 1 egg

Directions: Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Then lightly season the cut sides of squash with 1 tablespoon olive oil, salt and pepper. Place the halved squash in a baking dish, flesh side down, and add 1/2 cup water to the pan. Cover the pan tightly with aluminum foil and bake until tender, about 1 hour. Remove from the oven and cool completely. In a large skillet brown the sausage over medium-high heat, about 6 to 8 minutes. Remove the sausage from the pan and drain on paper towels. Wipe out the pan with paper towels. Heat the remaining olive oil in the pan, and add the onion and bell pepper, sauté until soft, about three minutes. Add the garlic, tomato and cook an additional minute. Remove the pan from the heat. In a large mixing bowl, mix the sausage with the vegetables, bread cubes, chicken stock, the mozzarella cheese, parsley and dried sage. Add the egg and stir well to combine. Season to taste with salt and pepper, and mix well. Divide the stuffing mixture between the baked squash halves, and top with the Parmesan cheese. Place the filled squash on a baking sheet and place in the preheated oven. Bake until the squash are heated through and the cheese melts, about 25 minutes.         

Kabocha                                                                                                                                                                                                                   

Pumpkin

Related Articles



Dees Platter

Savour and Eat!!!

Tony's Fun Kitchen

Food Recipes, Good Times, Fun Conversation

Zest4Food

Savour the seasons with me on a virtual culinary journey and discover international cooking and baking recipes

tggfood.com

Just another WordPress site

Travel with Kay

building a better Travel and a better Me

surprising recipes

easy, tasty and surprising recipes for everyone

All About That Food

Locally Grown Locally Made

Rock Bottom

My journey through the depths of hitting rock bottom and how I faced my fears and have started to turn my life around.

Outosego

|| thoughts

opt me TANYA

LIVE INDEED

ARJung

Independent author of fairy tales with a folkpunk and steampunk twist

Motivation & Environment

About Motivation, Self-help, Environment, Futuristic Science & Technology, GOD, and Spirituality

Intellectual Shaman

Poetry for Finding Meaning in the Madness

Claire’s

Cooking Creations

OlverIndulgence

Make Food Your Own

Mystic Meals

Where Cooking is Easy and Magical!

Just Peachy

Sweet treats, crafts, trips and more!

Flavour Adventure

Exploring flavours of the world

Dreams in Young Flourish

Diamonds, diamonds and stars

SLUK

Global Management Consultants

Midwest Fancy

Recipes that your friends will call fancy

my book eyes

A Children's Book Review Blog

recipes

great treats to make with a bottle of naturual neqta

The Mysterious Blogger

Only the ‘Shadow’ Knows for Sure!

Raastha

A blog on travel, food, our earth and many little amazing things!!!!

Julie Journeys

Off the beaten path adventures, hidden gems, and travel tips from around the World!

Your Home for Homemade Japanese Food

How to cook "with visual instructions" healthy, traditional and delicious Japanese dishes!!

Buona Fortuna Lodge # 2835

Sons and Daughters Of Italy In America

BOOK Brigade

happy reading everyday with Mickey

cartographysis

when literature and travel meet at the cul-de-sac

nekesaagola.wordpress.com/

This is a lifestyle blog. I get to put down life experiences of different people.Their passions and their joys, their struggles and their tears. I also get to feature once in a while.

Travel & Lifestyle

Dreamer in a wild world

Wege der Selbstheilung

Kostenlose Selbsthilfereihe mit verschiedenen Themengebieten, Podcast, Gedichten, Videos und Musik

La bibliothèque de Sev

Chroniques livresques et élucubrations littéraires

Foodgloriousfood

A blog all about food, from farm to fork. Eating myself happy, using food to improve mental health. Sharing everything I know about food and keeping you up to date with food news..

Jhilli's Culinaireculture

Influence of different cultures & countries on food of each other.

Travel and Hike with PCOS

Rollercoaster ride of life

Tips from Sharvi

Tips to make your daily life easier!

My German Table

German comfort food for the soul

TaraLynns Eden

Cats, Dogs, Food, Exercise, Health & Beauty, Meditation and of course AMAZON!!!

Keto For Health

Fitness and Health Through Keto Diets

%d bloggers like this: