Advertisements

Healthy Mediterranean Cooking at Home

Tag Archives: swordfish

Swordfish Marinara

When many of us think of swordfish, we think..well, isn’t it endangered? The answer — at least for American swordfish — is no!

It is true that swordfish stocks were low in the 1980’s and early 1990’s, but, now, North Atlantic stocks are on the rebound and environmental watchdog groups list them as a “good alternative.” 

Under an international rebuilding plan for swordfish, the United States implemented a number of management measures to reduce the amount of fishing, to protect undersized swordfish and to allow the swordfish population to grow and rebuild. Fishermen, managers and scientists worked together to develop new management measures that reduced the impact U.S. fishery had on marine animals, making it one of the most environmentally responsible industries in the world. The North Atlantic swordfish rebuilding program is one of the great success stories in fishery management.

As for Pacific swordfish, they were never in trouble — especially in the waters around Hawaii. They get an “A” rating as a sustainable seafood choice by groups like the Monterey Bay Aquarium. You should buy swordfish that has been caught off the coasts of America because the technique used for catching imported swordfish is controversial and unregulated.

The swordfish is found in oceanic regions worldwide, including the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. It is found in tropical, temperate, and sometimes in cold waters. The swordfish is a highly migratory species, generally moving to warmer waters in the winter and cooler waters in the summer. Swordfish have been prized since men first set to sea and Sicilian fishermen still put to sea on open boats, calling out in an Ancient Greek dialect, they believe capable of drawing the fish within range of their hand-thrown harpoons. Swordfish is very popular in Italy, especially in the southern regions.

Swordfish is one of the most powerful fish in the ocean. Elusive and combative, the swordfish is prized by recreational anglers. Its name comes from its long, flat, sword-like bill, which is larger than those of other billfish species. When hooked and brought near the boat, the swordfish aggressively wields its bill, forcing anglers to use extreme caution to avoid being injured.

Like other billfish, females grow larger than males. Swordfish feed near the surface at night on squid and other small fish and, during the day, they move into deeper water to feed on larger fish that they stun with their slashing bill. Swordfish generally live about nine years, although, some have lived to 15 years. Fully grown, they can exceed 14 feet in length. Sexual maturity occurs between five and six years. In the Gulf of Mexico, spawning takes place year-round, and peaks from late April to July near the Gulf’s Loop Current.

Because of their size — the average swordfish weighs about 110 pounds — they’re sold as steaks, and while this makes cleaning and boning quite easy, it also means that an unscrupulous fishmonger may be tempted to pass off other steaks, in particular dogfish, as swordfish. For this reason fishmongers usually put the head on display when they set out swordfish steaks. How to be certain it’s swordfish? The spine is true bone, not the cartilage of a dogfish, and there will be an X of darker flesh bracketing the vertebra. Swordfish is popular because of its mildly sweet flavor, moist, meaty texture and moderately high fat content. It is an excellent source of selenium, niacin and vitamin B12.

Swordfish is made for the grill. The meat is so firm it that appeals to many who do not like fish. The texture, also, helps prevent the steaks from falling apart on the grill.

A typical swordfish meal is prepared with a simple olive oil-based marinade, grilled and served simply with lemon, salt and herbs. Good swordfish needs nothing more than this.

Cook swordfish like you would a rare steak: Use high heat to sear the outside and let it stay a little rare in the middle.

Make sure to leave the skin on when you grill, but take it off to serve: The skin is rubbery, but helps to keep the fish moist.

Swordfish is also an excellent stewing fish because it won’t fall apart. Use it for a fish chowder, or as a component in Cioppino or another fish stew or slowly simmer it in tomato sauce.

Swordfish is also good in a salad such as a Nicoise or even a classic tuna salad. 

When choosing swordfish, look for the little strip of dark meat to be red, not brown. If it’s brown, the meat is old. Know that East Coast swordfish tends to be a little rosier than Pacific swordfish due to their diet. Tightly wrapped swordfish freezes well for about 3-4 months; beyond that goes downhill fast.

A few of my favorite ways to prepare swordfish are included here for you to try. The recipe for the dish pictured at the top of the post, Swordfish Marinara, is just below.

 

Swordfish Marinara

Serves 4

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1 small onion, finely chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1-28 ounce container Pomi chopped tomatoes
  • 1/2 cup kalamata olives
  • 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • 2 tablespoons pine  (pignoli) nuts
  • 1/4 cup fresh basil, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon fresh oregano, minced
  • 1/2 cup dry red wine
  • 1 cup fresh breadcrumbs
  • 1/4 cup flat-leaf parsley, chopped
  • Salt and freshly cracked black pepper to taste
  • 4 (6-ounce) swordfish fillets, about 1 inch thick

Directions:

Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil over medium heat in an oven-proof skillet. Add the onion and garlic and saute until softened about 5 minutes. Add the tomatoes and bring to a boil. Lower the heat and simmer for 20-25 minutes until the sauce thickens. Stir in olives, crushed red pepper flakes, pine nuts, basil, oregano, wine and salt to taste.

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F.

Combine bread crumbs, parsley, remaining olive oil, salt and pepper.

Sprinkle swordfish with sea salt and pepper. Place fish in the tomato sauce and top each with 1/4 cup of the breadcrumb mixture. Place skillet in the oven and bake for 15-20 minutes or until swordfish is cooked to your liking..

Serve with pasta or crusty Italian bread and a salad.

Swordfish Piccata                                                                                                                                                       

Serves 4

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour for dredging
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon cracked black pepper
  • 1 1/2 fresh boneless swordfish, cut into 4 pieces
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/3 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • 2 tablespoons capers, drained
  • 1/3 cup minced fresh parsley
  • Lemon garnish

Directions:

Combine the flour, pepper, and salt in a shallow dish such as a pie plate. Dredge the swordfish slices in the flour mixture and shake off any excess.

In a large skillet, over medium-high heat, heat the olive oil with the butter. When hot, add the fish and cook until browned on the underside, 2 to 3 minutes. Turn fish over and cook until well browned on the other side. Transfer to a platter and keep warm.

To make the sauce:

Add the garlic to the skillet and cook until fragrant, 30 seconds to 1 minute. Add the lemon juice and wine to the pan and deglaze, scraping up any browned bits. Bring to a boil, turn heat to low and add the capers. Adjust the salt seasoning to taste. Return the swordfish to the skillet and let the fish cook for a few minutes so that it can absorb the flavors of the sauce. Sprinkle with the parsley and serve at once, garnished with lemon.

Swordfish in Orange Sauce                                                                                                                                  

Serves 4

Serve with orzo tossed with chopped fresh basil and toasted pine nuts.

Ingredients:

  • 4 (6-ounce) swordfish steaks
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 teaspoons minced garlic
  • 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • 2 tablespoons raisins
  • 2 tablespoons fresh orange juice
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons pitted, chopped kalamata olives
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons chopped bottled roasted red bell peppers
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons chopped red onion

Directions:

Heat a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat and add olive oil. Sprinkle fish evenly with salt and black pepper. Add fish to the pan and sauté about 5 minutes on each side or until fish flakes easily when tested with a fork. Remove fish from pan; cover and keep warm.

Add garlic and crushed red pepper to the pan and sauté for 30 seconds. Add raisins, orange juice, olives, roasted pepper and onion to pan and cook for 1 minute. Top fish with sauce and serve.

Baked Swordfish Fillets

Serve with green beans.                                                                                                                    

Serves 4

Ingredients:

  • 4 swordfish steaks about 6 oz each, skin removed
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 fennel bulb, thinly sliced
  • 4 ripe tomatoes, sliced
  • 1 lemon, sliced
  • 4 tablespoons chopped parsley
  • 2 teaspoons chopped oregano
  • 2 teaspoons finely chopped rosemary
  • 1 teaspoon chopped thyme
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Season the swordfish with salt and pepper. Coat a large baking dish with olive oil cooking spray. Spread the fennel in the baking dish and season with salt and pepper.

Place the swordfish on top of the fennel in a single layer. Top with the tomato and lemon slices. Mix the parsley, oregano, rosemary, and thyme together and sprinkle over the fish. Pour the wine and the oil over the fish. Cover with aluminum foil.

Bake for 15–20 minutes, or until the fish is cooked and flakes with a knife. Serve with the pan juices poured over the fish.

Advertisements

LEO GERMANO AND JENNIFER EWING’s mural is entitled Papa Gainni which depicts an Italian fishing village. It is at Café Trieste located at 1667 Market Street, San Francisco.

Italy is water-bound, with thousands of miles of beaches, bays and inlets. Almost everything that lives in the sea, from swordfish which the fishermen still harpoon from the bows of their boats in the Straights of Messina, to arselle or little clams that live in the sand just beyond the shore and gathered with strainers, fins there way to the table. 

The role of fish in the Italian diet was, in the past, even more important than it is now. Up until the Second Vatican Council, the Catholic Church required that their followers eat fish on Fridays and days of penitence.  All large cities had fishmongers to meet the demand, as well as, traveling fishmongers who made the rounds of the towns too small to support a specialized store. 

Each of Italy’s main regions are known for specific types of fish and the ways of preparing it. When Italians emigrated to America, they first settled along the coastal areas and brought with them their style of preparing fish. Vegetables are often used to create sauces in fish dishes in traditional Italian cooking.  The following recipes are examples of this cuisine.

fish2

Tuna Steaks Simmered With Fennel

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1 leek, white and light green parts only, cut in half lengthwise, cleaned, and thinly sliced
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 fennel bulbs, trimmed, quartered, cored and cut across the grain into thin slices
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1 1/2 pounds tuna steaks
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped parsley
Directions

Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in a large, heavy skillet over medium heat. Add the leek and cook, stirring, until leeks are limp, about 3 minutes. Add the garlic and cook, stirring, until the mixture is fragrant, 30 seconds to a minute.

Add the fennel and a generous pinch of salt and cook, stirring often, until it begins to soften, about 5 minutes. Turn the heat to low, cover and cook slowly for 30 to 40 minutes, stirring often. Stir in the lemon juice, taste and adjust seasonings. The mixture should be very soft. Remove to a bowl and keep warm.

Season the tuna steaks with salt and pepper and heat the remaining olive oil in the skillet over medium-high heat. Cook the tuna steaks for 1 minute on each side and remove to a plate.

Return the fennel mixture to the skillet and place the tuna on top of the mixture. Cover the pan, turn the heat down to medium-low and simmer for another 5 to 10 minutes, until the fish is cooked through or cooked the way you like it.

Sprinkle on the parsley and serve, laying the fish on top of the fennel, with lemon wedges on the side.

Yield: 4 servings.

Fast Italian Fish

 

Ingredients

Directions

Heat oven to 425°F.

Trim ends off the zucchini and cut lengthwise into quarters. Place on nonstick baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and freshly ground black pepper.

Roast 5 minutes.

Place  1 slice prosciutto on top of each fish fillet.

Remove the baking pan from the oven, turn zucchini over and pushthem to one side and put fish on pan.

Roast until the fish is cooked and the zucchini quarters are tender, about 8 minutes. Top each fillet with 1 tablespoon pesto and garnish with fresh basil leaves.

Pasta With Sardines, Bread Crumbs and Capers

Nutritionist and author, Jonny Bowden of  “The 150 Healthiest Foods on Earth,”  has created a list of healthy foods people should be eating but aren’t. Sardines is one of them. They are high in omega-3’s, contain virtually no mercury and are loaded with calcium. They also contain iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, zinc, copper and manganese, as well as, a full complement of B vitamins. Choose sardines packed in olive oil.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
Ingredients

  • Salt
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 cup bread crumbs, ideally made from stale bread
  • 1 onion, chopped and garlic
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 pound long pasta with a hole through the center, like perciatelli
  • 1 teaspoon grated lemon zest
  • 2 tablespoons drained capers
  • 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • 2 cans sardines packed in extra virgin olive oil (about 1/2 pound)
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley, plus more for garnish.

Directions

Bring a large pot of water to a boil and salt it. Add the pasta to the boiling water and cook until just tender; drain, reserving some of the cooking liquid.

Put half the oil (2 tablespoons) in a medium skillet over medium heat. When it’s hot, add the bread crumbs and cook, stirring frequently, until golden and fragrant, less than 5 minutes, and then remove them to a bowl.

Add the remaining oil and the onion to the pan, sprinkle with salt and pepper and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 5 minutes.

Turn the heat under the onions to medium-high and add the lemon zest, capers, crushed red pepper and sardines; cook, stirring occasionally, until just heated through, about 2 minutes.

Add the cooked pasta to the sardine mixture and toss well to combine. Add the parsley, most of the bread crumbs and some reserved pasta cooking water, if necessary, to moisten. Taste and adjust seasoning.  Garnish with parsley and remaining bread crumbs.
Yield: 4 to 6 servings.

Swordfish – a staple in Italian cuisine.

I know what you’re thinking: Isn’t swordfish endangered? No. Or at least it’s not endangered anywhere around the United States. The various fish watchdog organizations all give consumers the green light to eat as much swordfish as they want, provided it was caught in North American or Hawaiian waters.

The Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch gives American swordfish either a “best choice” or “good alternative” rating, depending on how it’s caught.

If you’ve never worked with swordfish, it is dense and meaty. It also has a rubbery skin around the outside that must be removed. When shopping for swordfish, pay attention to the bloodline, that red patch of meat in the steak. It should be red. If it is brown, the fish is old. Good alternatives to swordfish, if you can’t find it, are yellowfin tuna or mahi mahi.

involtini-di-pesce-spada-al-forno

Swordfish Roll–Ups

Yield: Serves 4

Use a light hand when pounding the fish; it should be thin enough to roll around the simple bread-crumb-and-cheese filling, but not so thin that it rips.

Ingredients

  • Juice of 2 lemons, strained of seeds
  • 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 cup minced fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil
  • 1 tablespoon drained, chopped capers
  • 6 sun-dried tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh rosemary
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Four 6-ounce pieces swordfish, cut long and thin so each is 4 or 5 inches long
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • ½ cup minced yellow onion
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • ¼ cup fresh or dried bread crumbs
  • ½ cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme
  • 1 tablespoon drained capers, minced
  • 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • 2 ounces provolone, thinly sliced or grated

Directions

To make the sauce:

Put the lemon juice in a small nonreactive bowl. Add the olive oil in a slow, steady stream, whisking until emulsified. Stir in the parsley, basil, capers, and rosemary and season to taste with salt and pepper. Set aside until ready to use. 

To make the fish:

Lay the swordfish between 2 sheets of plastic wrap.  Using a meat mallet or the bottom of a small, heavy skillet, lightly pound the fish until it is about ¼ inch thick. Transfer the fish to a plate, season with salt and black pepper.

Preheat the oven to 400°F.

In a sauté pan, heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil over medium-high heat. Saute the onion and garlic for 2 to 3 minutes, or until the onion is translucent. Add the bread crumbs and sun-dried tomatoes.  Cook, stirring, for 2 to 3 minutes, or until golden brown. Remove pan from the heat and stir in the parsley, thyme, capers and red pepper. Season with salt and black pepper and set aside.

Spread the bread crumb mixture over the fish. Cover with the provolone and roll each piece of fish into a cylinder. Hold the rolls closed with toothpicks.

In an ovenproof sauté pan, heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil over medium heat and saute the swordfish rolls until golden brown on all sides. Turn them carefully with tongs or a wooden spoon. Transfer the pan to the oven and bake for 4 to 6 minutes, just until they are still moist in the center. Do not overcook.

Put each swordfish roll on a plate. Whisk the vinaigrette and spoon a little over each roll. 


           Grilling is one of the healthiest ways to cook, if you do it right!

By choosing foods that are low in fat, high in nutrients and full of flavor you can get great meals that are also healthy. Use marinades, not only to add extra flavor, but also to reduce the formation of cancer causing substances on foods. A marinade containing olive oil and/or citrus juices can reduce the formation of these chemicals by as much as 99% and, since, marinades tenderize meats, you will have a much better meal.

There has been a lot of talk about grilling and cancer. While the risk is real and you really need to keep this in mind, there are some simple things you can do to greatly reduce the cancer risk.  Two primary substances, Heterocyclic Amines (HCA) and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) are chemicals that form on  food, primarily meats, when they come  in contact with intense heat and flame. They are known cancer causing agents, so you need to reduce their formation, as much as you can. HCAs and PAHs are formed mostly from fat. Either by fat being heated to extreme temperatures or by the smoke created by fat burning. For the most part, this applies to meat fats and not just the grease and fat from what you are cooking, but from the build up on the bottom of your grill.

Scientists at the Food Safety Consortium project at Kansas State University have discovered that herbs of the Lamiaceae family (basil, mint, rosemary, thyme, oregano, and sage) used in marinades, reduced HCA formation dramatically.   These herbal antioxidants reduce the formation of chemicals when meat is grilled and, also happen to be,  herbs traditionally used in Italian cooking.


To reduce the risks follow these basic tips:

  • Keep your grill clean. A clean grill not only cooks better it is safer in every way.
  • Trim excess fats from foods. These fats are the troublemaker, so keep it to a minimum.
  • Use marinades based on olive oil and/or citrus juices.
  • Avoid flare-ups. Flare-ups burn foods and this increases HCA formation.
  • Don’t overcook foods. The charred bits on foods are the largest sources of PAHs and HCAs, so if you have charred sections of meat cut them off.
  • Use herbs like basil, mint, rosemary, thyme, oregano, and sage to add flavor and reduce HCA formation in foods.
  • Grill extra vegetables to accompany meats. They do not form HCAs like meats do, plus the antioxidants they contain may help to lessen some of the damage HCAs and other cooking toxins cause in your body.

 Appetizers

Clams Oreganato on the Grill

Serves 4 as an appetizer

  • 1 cup Progresso Italian bread crumbs
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 cloves of garlic chopped very fine
  • 2 tablespoons chopped parsley
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon crushed red pepper
  • 12 cherrystone or littleneck clams, scrubbed
  • 3-4 tablespoons low sodium chicken broth
  • 1 lemon, cut into wedges

Heat grill and coat the rack with vegetable oil.  Dip each closed clam in water (this will add steam) and place on the grill so that none of the clams are overlapping. Close cover and grill for approximately 4-5 minutes or until clam shells open. Check often for clams that have popped open. Remove clams  with tongs to a platter as soon as they open their shells.

In a bowl, combine the bread crumbs, garlic, parsley, oregano, crushed red pepper and salt. Add the olive oil and stir until well combined. Add enough of the chicken stock to moisten the bread crumbs..

Top the bottom half of the clams with the bread crumb mixture, dividing mixture evenly on top of each clam, and place back on the grill. Close grill cover and for about 1 minute or until just heated through. Serve with lemon wedges. 

Origins of Bruschetta

Bruschetta comes to us from Central Italy where it’s chiefly eaten as an appetizer or snack. The most basic bruschetta begins with tomatoes, good quality olive oil, garlic, vinegar, and onions.  Depending on the combinations of ingredients you use, you can take this dish, from such a basic foundation, to one that is a uniquely- flavored creation.

Grilled Vegetable Bruschetta

1 small eggplant (1/2 – 3/4 pound)
1 small zucchini summer squash
1 large meaty tomato (about 1/2 pound)
1 red bell pepper
1 Vidalia onion, peeled
Olive oil
2 garlic cloves, cut in half
1/4 cup chopped fresh basil
6-1″ thick slices fresh Italian bread
1 cup (about 4 ounces) shredded mozzarella cheese
Balsamic vinegar

Cut the eggplant lengthwise into 1/2-inch thick slices. Cut the squash into long diagonal 1/2-inch thick slices. Cut the  onion and tomato into crosswise 1/2-inch thick slices. Cut the pepper into quarters.  Season vegetables with kosher salt, pepper and brush with olive oil. Brush bread slices with a little oil.
Put all the vegetables on the grill, except the tomato. Grill on medium high heat until cooked through and grill marks are formed, about 10 minutes. Grill the tomato slices about 2 minutes.
Grill one side of bread until lightly toasted, about 1 minute. Remove bread and vegetables from grill.  While the bread is hot, rub the toasted side of each piece with garlic .
Chop vegetables into very small dice and add basil. Serve chopped vegetables on bread slices, drizzle with balsamic vinegar and sprinkle with shredded mozzarella cheese.

Main Dishes

Spinach Pesto

  • 2 cups lightly packed baby spinach leaves (about 2 ounces)
  • 1/4 cup pine nuts, toasted
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons grated lemon peel
  • 1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/3 cup freshly grated Parmesan

Combine the spinach, pine nuts, lemon juice, and lemon peel in a processor. Lightly pulse. With the machine running, gradually add the oil, blending until the mixture is creamy.  Stir in the Parmesan. Season the pesto with salt and pepper to taste.  This pesto freezes well if you have it leftover.

Grilled Boneless Chicken Breasts

Prepare grill and oil grates.
Brush 4 boneless chicken breasts with olive oil and season with salt and pepper.  

Grill 5 minutes each side..  Top with a tablespoon or two of Spinach Pesto.
Spinach Pesto is also goes well with grilled scallops.

Grilled Fennel-Garlic Pork Chops

Fennel seed and pork are a fairly typical Italian combination.

  • 1 tablespoons whole fennel seeds
  • 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • 3 medium garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons  olive oil
  • 4 (¾-inch-thick) loin bone-in pork chops
  • Vegetable oil for brushing grill rack

Grind the fennel seeds and crushed red pepper flakes in a spice grinder or mortar and pestle (or, if you don’t have either of those, in a plastic bag with a rolling pin). Combine them in a  bowl with the garlic, salt and enough of the olive oil to make a paste.

Pat the chops dry with paper towels, then spread the fennel-garlic paste over both sides of the chops. Let sit for 30 minutes (or up to a few hours, if you put them in the refrigerator;  bring back to room temperature before cooking).

Grill the chops for 1-2 minutes per side over a hot fire, then reduce the heat to medium-low and cook for another 5-10 minutes, turning once or twice, until the internal temperature reaches at least 137 F. Let sit for a few minutes. Serve with a green salad.   4 servings

Grilled Bone-in Chicken Breasts and Legs with Tomato Olive BBQ Sauce

Tomato Olive Barbecue Sauce Ingredients:

  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 large red onion, finely chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1/4 cup red wine vinegar
  • 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1 cup tomato puree
  • 1/4 cup tomato paste
  • 1/4 cup Kalamata olives, chopped fine
  • 1/2 cup honey
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 4 tablespoons steak sauce
  • 3 tablespoons Sambuca, (optional)
  • Freshly ground black pepper and kosher salt to taste

Instructions:

  • Heat the olive oil over medium heat and add the onions, reduce heat, cover, sweat in the oil for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  • Add the garlic,  stir and cook for another 5 minutes.
  • Pour in the red wine and balsamic vinegar, tomato puree, tomato paste, olives, honey, Worcestershire sauce, steak sauce, Sambuca, and salt and pepper.
  • Raise heat to high and bring to a boil.
  • Reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes.
  • Remove from heat and let cool down to room temperature.

Chicken Ingredients:

  • 4 bone-in chicken breasts and 4 chicken legs with thighs attached

Instructions:

  • Prepare grill for medium indirect grilling.
  • Brush each piece of chicken with barbecue sauce.
  • Grill indirectly until juices run clear, about 15 to 20 minutes.  The chicken needs to reach an internal temperature of 165 degrees F.
  • Remove the chicken from the grill, cover and allow to rest for about 5 minutes.
  • Serve with remaining BBQ sauce for dipping.

Swordfish Kabobs

2 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon grated lemon rind
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 teaspoons grated orange rind
1 tablespoon fresh orange juice
2 teaspoons honey
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
5 garlic cloves, chopped
1 1/2 pounds swordfish steaks, cut into 1-inch pieces (try to get 12 evenly cut cubes.)
4 medium red onions, peeled and quartered
12 (1-inch) pieces red bell pepper
12 cherry tomatoes
Vegetable oil

Combine first 10 ingredients in a large zip-top plastic bag; add swordfish fish cubes. Seal and marinate in refrigerator 30 minutes, turning once.
Prepare grill and oil grates. Remove fish from bag; discard marinade. Thread swordfish cubes, onions, and bell pepper alternately onto each of 4 (10-inch) skewers. Thread cherry tomatoes on a fifth skewer and set aside.
Place swordfish kabobs on grill and grill 8 minutes or until desired degree of doneness, turning once. After 4 minutes, place the tomatoes on the grill and rotate after two minutes. Serve tomatoes with fish kabobs and garnish with lemon slices. Serve with rice.
Serves 4.


Florentine Steak

Bistecca alla Fiorentina is traditionally made using T-bone or Porterhouse steaks, but you could make it with rib eyes, strip loins, sirloin, or even fillet steak.
As long as the meat is of a very high quality (organic, grassfed is best), it will taste delicious, even if it’s not entirely authentic!  It is healthy only if you keep portions small – about 4 oz. per person.
The marinating time is quite long, so make sure you start this dish at least a day before you want to eat it.


  • 2 10 oz. T-bone steaks
  • 8 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 6 fresh rosemary sprigs
  • 3 garlic cloves, crushed
  • Sea Salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Balsamic vinegar or lemon
  • High quality extra virgin olive oil


Put the steak in a shallow dish. Mix together the olive oil, rosemary, and garlic and season with salt and pepper. Pour over the steak, cover  and let rest in the refrigerator to marinate for 24 to 48 hours.
Heat a grill until it is very hot. Grill the meat to taste, turning to cook the steak evenly on both sides. Traditional Bistecca alla Fiorentina is served rare to medium-rare; test for doneness using an instant-read thermometer.  Cook to an internal temperature of 130 to 135°F for medium-rare or an internal temperature of 120 to 125°F for rare.

Remove steaks from grill, and let rest for 5 minutes before slicing. Slice steak across grain, then place slices on heated dinner plates.   Drizzle with a little balsamic vinegar or lemon juice and olive oil and shave some parmesan cheese over the top. Season to taste and serve. Good with an Arugula Salad.
Serves 4 or more

Dessert

Grilled Peaches with Mascarpone Cheese

  • 4 firm, ripe peaches, pitted and halved
  • olive oil for brushing the cut sides of the peaches
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 2 tablespoons Amaretto liqueur
  • 1/2 cup mascarpone cheese, room temperature
  • 8 teaspoons fig jam
  • Mint leaves

Brush peaches lightly with olive oil. Place the peaches on a greased grill rack, cut side down, and do not move the peaches in order to get grill marks on them. It takes about 2 to 3 minutes per side to get those grill marks.  Continue grilling the peaches until slightly softened and heated through, about 5 to 6 minutes total. Turn the peaches over and warm a minute or two.

Mix together the mascarpone cheese, Amaretto and honey.
To serve peaches, place a teaspoon of fig jam in the hollow where the pit had been and top each with a tablespoon of the mascarpone mixture.  Decorate with mint leaves.



Tony's Fun Kitchen

Food Recipes, Good Times, Fun Conversation

Zest4Food

Savour the seasons with me on a virtual culinary journey and discover international cooking and baking recipes

tggfood.com

Just another WordPress site

Travel with Kay

building a better Travel and a better Me

surprising recipes

easy, tasty and surprising recipes for everyone

All About That Food

Locally Grown Locally Made

Rock Bottom

My journey through the depths of hitting rock bottom and how I faced my fears and have started to turn my life around.

Outosego

|| thoughts

opt me TANYA

LIVE INDEED

ARJung

Independent author of fairy tales with a folkpunk and steampunk twist

Motivation & Environment

About Motivation, Self-help, Environment, Futuristic Science & Technology, GOD, and Spirituality

Intellectual Shaman

Poetry for Finding Meaning in the Madness

Claire’s

Cooking Creations

OlverIndulgence

Make Food Your Own

Mystic Meals

Where Cooking is Easy and Magical!

Just Peachy

Sweet treats, crafts, trips and more!

Flavour Adventure

Exploring flavours of the world

Dreams in Young Flourish

Diamonds, diamonds and stars

SLUK

Global Management Consultants

Midwest Fancy

Recipes that your friends will call fancy

my book eyes

A Children's Book Review Blog

recipes

great treats to make with a bottle of naturual neqta

The Mysterious Blogger

Only the ‘Shadow’ Knows for Sure!

Raastha

A blog on travel, food, our earth and many little amazing things!!!!

Julie Journeys

Off the beaten path adventures, hidden gems, and travel tips from around the World!

Your Home for Homemade Japanese Food

How to cook "with visual instructions" healthy, traditional and delicious Japanese dishes!!

Buona Fortuna Lodge # 2835

Sons and Daughters Of Italy In America

BOOK Brigade

happy reading everyday with Mickey

cartographysis

when literature and travel meet at the cul-de-sac

nekesaagola.wordpress.com/

This is a lifestyle blog. I get to put down life experiences of different people.Their passions and their joys, their struggles and their tears. I also get to feature once in a while.

Travel & Lifestyle

Dreamer in a wild world

Wege der Selbstheilung

Kostenlose Selbsthilfereihe mit verschiedenen Themengebieten, Podcast, Gedichten, Videos und Musik

La bibliothèque de Sev

Chroniques livresques et élucubrations littéraires

Foodgloriousfood

A blog all about food, from farm to fork. Eating myself happy, using food to improve mental health. Sharing everything I know about food and keeping you up to date with food news..

Jhilli's Culinaireculture

Influence of different cultures & countries on food of each other.

Travel and Hike with PCOS

Rollercoaster ride of life

Tips from Sharvi

Tips to make your daily life easier!

My German Table

German comfort food for the soul

TaraLynns Eden

Cats, Dogs, Food, Exercise, Health & Beauty, Meditation and of course AMAZON!!!

Keto For Health

Fitness and Health Through Keto Diets

Moda-Creative thinking

Moda-Creative thinking

%d bloggers like this: