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Pork Roulade

Ingredients

2 pork tenderloin filets about 12 oz each, trimmed of fat and silver skin
1/2 cup finely chopped onion
4 oz container unsweetened applesauce
1/4 cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
2 tablespoons chopped fresh sage
1 tablespoon grated lemon rind
1 garlic clove, minced
1 teaspoon salt, divided
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, divided
1 tablespoon olive oil
1/2 cup low sodium chicken broth
4 tablespoons apple cider
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice

Directions

Slice tenderloins lengthwise, cutting to, but not through the other side. Open halves, laying the tenderloins flat. Place plastic wrap over the tenderloins; pound to 1/2-inch thickness using a meat mallet. Overlap the two tenderloins by about an inch or so to create one piece of meat. Press together.

Combine onion, applesauce, parsley, sage, lemon zest, and garlic in a bowl. Sprinkle 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon pepper over the pork. Spread the applesauce mixture over the tenderloins, leaving a 1/2-inch border around the outside edges. Roll up the tenderloin jelly-roll fashion, starting with the long sides. Secure at 2-inch intervals with twine. Sprinkle 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon pepper over the roulade. Place the tenderloin in a large zip-top plastic bag, and seal. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour.

Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add the roulade; cook 5 minutes, turning until browned on all sides. Add broth, apple cider, and mustard. Bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat and simmer 20 minutes.

Remove the roulade from the pan; keep warm. Cook broth mixture until reduced to 1/2 cup (about 10 minutes). Stir in lemon juice. Remove twine from the roulade. Slice crosswise into 3/4-inch-thick slices. Place a serving of the potato carrot puree on each serving plate. Place a serving of pork over the puree and drizzle with sauce.

Carrot Sweet Potato Puree

4 servings

Ingredients

1 pound carrots, peeled and chopped
2 sweet potatoes, peeled and chopped
1/2 cup buttermilk
¼ teaspoon garlic salt

Directions

Put the carrots and the sweet potatoes in a large saucepan, cover with cold water and bring to a boil over high heat. Cover, reduce to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes or until the carrots and potatoes are tender. Drain and transfer to a food processor. Process until a chunky mixture forms. Add the buttermilk and garlic salt and process until smooth and creamy.

Roasted Asparagus With Creamy Lemon Sauce

Ingredients

Salt and Pepper
2 tablespoon butter, diced
1 bunch asparagus
1 lemon
1/2 cup sour cream
1 tablespoon heavy cream
1 tablespoon snipped fresh chives

Directions

Preheat the oven to 400°F.

Trim the bottom 2-inches from the asparagus, and if desired, peel the lower 2 inches of the stalks. Place the asparagus in a greased baking pan. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and dot with the butter
Roast the asparagus for 15-20 minutes,

For the sauce:
Grate 1 teaspoon peel from the lemon and squeeze 1 tablespoon juice into a small bowl. Whisk in sour cream, heavy cream, and 1/4 teaspoon each salt and freshly ground black pepper. The sauce can be refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 3 days.
Spoon sauce over asparagus and garnish with chives.


Pork is the culinary name for meat from the domestic pig and is one of the most commonly consumed meats worldwide, with evidence of pig husbandry dating back to 5000 BC.

Since the animals are now bred to be lean, the meat is higher in protein and about 30 percent lower in calories, saturated fat and cholesterol than the pork produced in the 1970’s.

With so many lean cuts of pork to choose from, many pork cuts are comparable to skinless chicken cuts. A 3-ounce serving of pork tenderloin is as lean as a skinless chicken breast. It contains 120 calories and only 2.98 grams of total fat. Pound for pound, pork is one of the most economical buys in the meat case. Not only will you be getting nutritional value of B vitamins, zinc and iron; but pork’s financial value will leave you a little extra cash in the pocketbook.

Common Cuts of Pork for Grilling

Pork Chops

The meatiest chops are cut from the center of the loin: The two most common types are loin chops, which look like miniature T-bone steaks with a bit of the tenderloin attached and rib chops, without the tenderloin (see Pork Tenderloin). Because they dry out quickly during cooking, it’s especially important not to overcook lean boneless chops. Choose cuts that are at least an inch thick so they stay juicy.

Pork Loin

Buy this large cut (from the back of the pig) without bones, which makes it easier to slice.  Stuff it and cook it as a roast or slice it into 1-inch chops for pan-frying and grilling.

Pork Tenderloin

This lean, very tender cut from the end of the loin is long, narrow and tapering at one end. It is much smaller than a pork loin roast, so it cooks quickly and is a good choice for weeknight dinners. This cut of pork is the most healthy cut of pork. Cut from the back of the pig, it has virtually no fat. This fact also makes it easy to dry out and for that reason technique is important: grill it on hot grates and grill it quickly. Tenderloins also absorb marinades really well. 

Pork Sausage

Made from ground pork, sausages come in a variety of sizes and seasonings. Flavors range from sweet to savory and spicy. Sausages can be used in sauces, stews or as a pizza topping. Grilled sausage makes an excellent sandwich.

Baby-Back Ribs

Small and meaty, these curved slabs are taken from the pig’s rib cage near the backbone. Prized for their juicy meat, they cook quickly. A full rack has at least 8 ribs. For the tenderest meat, select a rack that weighs 2 pounds or less (which should feed 2-3 people).

Spare Ribs

Although not as meaty as baby-back ribs, spare ribs rely on a generous amount of fat for flavor. Large and irregularly shaped, they come from a pig’s underbelly or lower rib cage (also the source of bacon). A full rack has at least 11 ribs and weighs 3 to 4 pounds (which should feed 3 or 4 people).

Ham

Ham is taken from a pig’s leg. Some hams are sold fresh for baking, but most are cured with brine, salt and spices, making them juicier. Some are sold fully cooked and some are smoked, which imparts a more intense flavor. Hams are sold boneless, semi-boneless and with the bone in. Bone-in hams usually yield the best flavor, while boneless are easier to cut. Ham steaks are best for the grill.

 

 

Grilling is ideal for cooking smaller pork cuts, such as chops, steaks, ham slices, tenderloins, ribs, ground pork patties, sausages and kabobs. Because grilling uses high heat and short cooking times, it tends to toughen the meat, so it is best to use the most tender cuts available. Lean pork cuts will benefit from marinating before they are grilled.

Pork steaks and pork chops that are going to be grilled should be a minimum of 3/4 to 1 inch thick because the high heat will cook the meat quickly. If the cuts are thinner than this, it is easy to overcook the meat, causing it to dry out. The meat must be watched carefully while grilling. Coating the pork with a little oil or marinating it before cooking will help keep it moist. It is important that the grill be properly preheated so that it seals the juices into the meat quickly. The temperature at which the pork is cooked and the distance it is placed from the heat source are both important for providing tender, juicy, properly cooked pork.

Using a meat thermometer is the most accurate method for testing doneness. A regular meat thermometer is inserted before placing the meat on the grill and it remains there throughout the cooking time. An instant read thermometer is used to check for the recommended temperature once the meat has been cooked. 

Whether the grill is charcoal or gas, how you use the heat is key. Understanding the two grilling styles, direct and indirect, are essential for creating perfectly grilled meat. There are instances when either direct or indirect methods are appropriate. The direct method cooks foods directly over the heat source. Grill pork chops, ground pork burgers, pork kabobs and anything less than two inches in thickness over direct heat. Indirect heat cooks at a slower rate, as the heat source is off to the side, to prevent burning the outer area of the food while cooking evenly throughout. Grill larger cuts of meat, like pork shoulder and roasts, using indirect heat. (See photo above for direct/indirect heat method.)

When using direct grilling, the meat should be 3 to 6 inches away from the heat source and cooked on medium high heat. It is important that the heat source be accurately preheated to allow for even cooking. Pork is done at 160 degrees F. Cook larger cuts over indirect heat to an internal temperature of 150 degrees F. and allow the meat to rest for 10 minutes. The final internal temperature will continue to rise to 160 degrees F. A hint of pink in the center equates perfectly cooked pork that is not dried out. 

Start with a clean grill. Scrub the grates with a wire brush removing all grease buildup and charred food particles prior to every use. Grease the grates with cooking oil before starting the grill to prevent sticking and burning of items to be grilled. To reduce flare ups, choose lean cuts of meat, such as: pork tenderloin, top loin chop, center loin chop, rib chop, sirloin roast or 96% lean ground pork. Also, trim any visible fat before placing on the grill.

Marinades can come from fruit and vegetable purees. Vinegar mixtures, citrus juice, herbs, spices and olive oil all make great ingredients for marinades. In addition to marinating to maximize the natural flavor of lean meats, such as pork tenderloin and ham, pair pork with fresh fruits and vegetables to brighten and lighten up summertime meals. Pairing meat with citrus fruits or adding sliced apples, strawberries or other fruit  to your grilling skewer will increase the meal’s nutrition value. Grilled fruit, such as peaches, nectarines and plums add great flavor to pork entrees. Adding vegetables to the grill alongside the meat is a healthy alternative to fattening summer sides and it saves the cook time and work.

Grilled Pork Tenderloin

This is a master grilling recipe for pork tenderloin that works perfectly, no matter how you flavor the pork. 

Serves 4-5

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup kosher salt
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 pork tenderloins (about 2 pounds total)
  • 1 recipe Rosemary-Orange Glaze, see recipe below
  • Freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 1 recipe Orange Balsamic Sauce, see recipe below

Brining:

In a medium bowl, mix salt and sugar with 1 quart cool water until dissolved. Trim the tenderloins of excess fat and silverskin and submerge them in the brine; let stand about 45 minutes. Remove the pork from the brine, rinse thoroughly, and pat dry.

Season and grill:

Rub the brined tenderloins all over with the Rosemary-Orange Glaze and then season with the pepper. 

Heat a gas grill, turning all the burners to high until the grill is fully heated, 10 to 15 minutes.

Put the pork on the hot grill grate. Close the lid and grill for 7 minutes.

Turn the pork over, close the lid, and grill for another 6 minutes.

Turn off the heat (keep the lid closed) and continue to cook the pork for another 5 minutes. At this point, an instant-read thermometer inserted into the middle of the thickest end of the tenderloin should read 145° to 150°F. (If not, close the lid and let the pork continue to roast in the residual grill heat.) Remove the pork from the grill and let rest for 5 minutes before carving. Cut across the grain into 1/2-inch slices and serve with the Orange Balsamic Sauce .

To use a charcoal grill:

Prepare a two-zone fire, banking all the coals to one side of the grill. Use a wire brush to clean the grill rack and then brush it lightly with oil; close the lid and wait to let the air inside the grill get hot again. Position the pork directly over the hot coals and cook (covered), turning once, until nicely seared on both sides. Move the tenderloins to the coolest part of the grill (over no coals), close the lid, and cook for 5 minutes more. Grilling time may vary a bit, depending on how hot and consistent your fire is.

Rosemary-Orange Glaze 

Yields enough to glaze two pork tenderloins.

Ingredients:

  • 1/4 cup frozen orange juice concentrate, thawed
  • 1 teaspoon brown sugar
  • 4 teaspoons minced fresh rosemary

In a small saucepan, bring the concentrate, brown sugar and rosemary to a simmer. Simmer until the mixture reduces to about half. Set aside to cool slightly.

Orange Balsamic Sauce

Yields about 1/3 cup.

Ingredients:

  • 1 teaspoon vegetable oil or olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon minced fresh rosemary
  • 1/3 cup orange marmalade
  • 4 teaspoons balsamic vinegar

Directions:

Heat the oil in a small saucepan over medium heat. Add the garlic and rosemary and cook until fragrant and sizzling, about 30 seconds. Stir in the marmalade and vinegar. Heat until warm. After slicing the pork, add any juices from the carving board to the sauce and mix well. Pass separately when serving the pork tenderloins.

Pork Chops with Marsala and Porcini Mushrooms

Serves: 4

Ingredients:

  • 1½ cups very hot water
  • 1/2 ounce dried porcini mushrooms
  • 4 pork rib chops, each 8 to 10 ounces and ¾ to 1 inch thick
  • 3 teaspoons minced fresh rosemary, divided
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 12 ounces fresh cremini mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 cup thinly sliced scallions (white and light green parts only), divided (9 scallions)
  • 1/2 cup good-quality dry marsala
  • 1/2 cup low-sodium chicken broth
  • 1/3 cup half & half

Directions:

Pour the water into a 2-cup glass measuring cup, add the porcinis, and stir to submerge. Cover with a plate or bowl to keep the porcini submerged. Let soak until the mushrooms are soft, 20 to 30 minutes. Drain, reserving 1 cup of the soaking liquid and the porcini separately. If the porcini pieces are large, roughly chop them and set aside.

While the mushrooms are soaking, prepare the pork chops. In a small bowl combine 2 teaspoons of the rosemary, 1 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper. Brush the pork chops on both sides with the oil and season evenly with the spices.

Prepare the grill for direct cooking over high heat (450° to 550°F).

In a large skillet over medium-high heat, melt the butter. Add the creminis and cook until they release their liquid and become brown, 7 to 8 minutes, stirring frequently. Stir in the drained porcini, 3/4 cup of the scallions and the remaining rosemary. Saute for 2 minutes. Add the marsala and boil until reduced by about half, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the broth and the 1 cup reserved porcini soaking liquid, leaving any sediment behind. Boil until slightly reduced, 3 to 4 minutes. Stir in the half & half and boil until the liquid thickens to your desired sauce consistency, 3 to 5 minutes. Season the sauce with 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon pepper.

Brush the cooking grates clean. Grill the pork chops over direct high heat with the lid closed , 6 to 8 minutes depending on their thickness, turning once. Remove from the grill and let rest for 5 minutes. Spoon the mushroom sauce over the pork chops and top with the remaining 1/4 cup scallions. 

Pork Kabobs

Marinade:

  • 1/3 cup finely chopped fresh Italian parsley 
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons minced red onion
  • 1 tablespoon sherry vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon smoked paprika
  • 2 teaspoons minced garlic
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
  • Kosher salt

2 pork tenderloins, each about 1 pound, trimmed of silver skin and any excess fat, cut into 1¼-inch cubes

2 large bell peppers, 1 red and 1 green, cut into 1¼-inch squares

Directions:

Whisk the marinade ingredients, including a 1/2 teaspoon salt. Put the pork cubes in a large, resealable plastic bag and pour in the marinade. Press the air out of the bag and seal tightly. Turn the bag to distribute the marinade, place in a bowl, and refrigerate for 4 to 8 hours, turning occasionally.

If using bamboo skewers, soak in water for at least 30 minutes.

Prepare the grill for direct cooking over high heat (450° to 550°F).

Remove the pork from the bag and discard the marinade. Thread the pork and bell pepper squares alternately onto skewers.

Brush the cooking grates clean. Grill the skewers over direct high heat, with the lid closed, until the pork is barely pink in the center, 8 to 10 minutes, turning once or twice. Remove from the grill and serve immediately.

Ham Steaks with a Citrus Sauce

Serves: 6

Sauce:

  • 1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/3 cup finely chopped fresh Italian parsley 
  • 1/3 cup finely chopped red onion
  • Finely grated zest of 1 large orange
  • 1/4 cup fresh orange juice
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
  • 1 teaspoon minced garlic
  • 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Marinade:

  • 1 tablespoon orange marmalade
  • 1 tablespoon fresh orange juice
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar

2 bone-in ham steaks, each about 1 pound and ¾ inch thick

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1 orange, cut into wedges

Directions:

Prepare the grill for direct cooking over medium-high heat (400° to 500°F).

In a medium, nonreactive bowl combine the sauce ingredients.

In a small saucepan combine the marmalade, orange juice and vinegar. Cook over low heat just until the mixture thins slightly.

Blot the ham steaks dry with paper towels. Brush both sides of each ham steak with the marmalade mixture and season one side evenly with 1/4 teaspoon pepper.

Brush the cooking grates clean. Grill the ham steaks over direct medium-high heat, with the lid closed, until they are grill marked and crispy around the edges, 6 to 8 minutes, turning once. Remove from the grill and cut into individual portions. Serve warm with the sauce and orange wedges.

Sausage Vegetable Grill

4 Servings

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound lean hot or sweet Italian Pork Sausage links, cut into 1/2-inch slices
  • 1 medium zucchini, cut into 1-inch slices
  • 1 medium yellow summer squash, cut into 1-inch slices
  • 1 medium sweet red pepper, sliced
  • 1 medium onion, cut into wedges
  • 1 cup quartered fresh mushrooms
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon dried oregano
  • 1/4 cup chopped Italian parsley 
  • 1 teaspoon garlic salt
  • 1 teaspoon paprika

Directions:

In a large bowl, combine the first six ingredients.

In a small bowl, combine the oil, oregano, parsley, garlic salt and paprika.

Pour over sausage mixture; toss to coat.

Divide mixture between two pieces of heavy-duty foil (each about 14 in. x 12 in.). Fold foil around sausage mixture and seal tightly.

Grill both packages, covered, over medium heat for 25-30 minutes or until the sausage is cooked through.

Open foil carefully to allow steam to escape.

 


Sun-dried tomatoes are ripe tomatoes that are placed in the sun to remove most of the water content from the tomatoes. Cherry types of tomatoes will lose 88% of their initial (fresh) weight, while larger tomatoes can lose up to 93% during the process. As a result, it takes anywhere from 17 to 20 lbs of fresh tomatoes to make a single pound of sun-dried tomatoes.

Even after the procedure, the tomato fruits keep their nutritional value. The tomatoes are high in lycopene, antioxidants, and vitamin C, and low in sodium, fat, and calories.

sun dried tomatoes commercial production

Before modern canning methods were available, Italians dried tomatoes on their tile roofs for use in winter when fresh tomatoes were not an option. Nowadays, sun-dried tomatoes (pomodori secchiin Italian) are not as popular in Italy as they are in America, where they are mostly relegated to antipasto or as a flavor-booster for sauce. These dried, concentrated and flavorful tomatoes have enjoyed a popularity boost in the United States in the past couple of decades, initially as a gourmet item but fast becoming a favorite of home cooks.

Sun-dried tomato tips

Sun-dried tomatoes can be used in a wide variety of recipes and come in a variety of shapes and colors. Traditionally, they were made from dried red plum tomatoes, but they can be purchased in yellow varieties as well. Sun-dried tomatoes may also be preserved in olive oil, along with other ingredients such as rosemary, basil, dried paprika, and garlic.

Unless they are already packed in oil, sun-dried tomatoes will need to be reconstituted before use. Just let them soak in warm water for thirty minutes until soft and pliable, drain (reserve the liquid to add flavor to stocks and sauces), pat dry and use as directed in your recipe. You can also use wine, broth, or other cooking liquid to reconstitute. Once reconstituted, use them within several days or pack in olive oil and store in the refrigerator for up to two weeks.  To reconstitute in oil, simply cover the dried tomatoes with oil and refrigerate for 24 hours.

To use oil-packed, drain tomatoes from oil and use. Always be sure that those left in the jar are completely covered with oil, which may mean adding more oil as you use the tomatoes. Don’t toss out that oil when you’re done with the tomatoes. It will pick up flavor from the tomatoes and be great in salad dressings or used for sauteing.

Cooking with sun-dried tomatoes

The flavor of sun-dried tomatoes is quite intense, concentrated, and slightly salty, so a little goes a long way. Although they are wonderful with pasta, you’ll enjoy using sun-dried tomatoes with many other foods, including vegetables, meats, and breads. Unopened commercially dried tomatoes will be fine without refrigeration for six to nine months. Once opened, oil-packed dried tomatoes should be refrigerated and used within two weeks. They can also be frozen.

Sun-Dried-Tomato Vinaigrette

Yield: 1½ cups
This vinaigrette is rich and sweet from the sun-dried tomatoes, so you don’t need to use much of it on salad greens
To use it as a pesto sauce and/or to add it to a pasta dish, omit the vinegar, thin it down with pasta water, and add pine nuts, sautéed zucchini, and chopped fresh basil.

  • 12 oil packed sun-dried tomatoes
  • 1 garlic clove, peeled and minced
  • 1/3 cup balsamic vinegar
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • A few turns of freshly ground black pepper
  • ½ cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • ¼ cup olive oil

Place all the ingredients but the olive oil into the bowl of a food processor (or a blender) fitted with a metal blade, and purée to a thick paste.
Continuing to run the machine, add the oil slowly through the feed tube or the lid of the blender. Taste for salt.

Breakfast

Spinach and Sun-Dried Tomato Frittata

  • olive oil cooking spray
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 1 small shallot, chopped
  • 1 cup packed fresh spinach, chopped
  • 4 whole eggs
  • 3/4 cups egg substitute
  • 8 sun-dried tomato halves, chopped
  • 1/2 cup grated Asiago cheese
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Heat oven to 425°F. Coat 4 small baking dishes with cooking spray. Set aside. Heat oil in a large pan over medium heat. Cook shallot until soft but not brown, 2 to 3 minutes. Add spinach; cook 2 to 3 minutes. Remove from heat. Lightly whisk eggs and egg substitute in a bowl. Stir in sun-dried tomatoes, cheese, basil, spinach mixture, salt and pepper. Spoon into baking dishes; bake until firm in the center, 12 to 14 minutes

 Lunch


Turkey, Sun-Dried Tomato and Basil Wraps

  • 1/2 cup cream cheese, low-fat whipped
  • 2 tablespoons jarred julienned sun-dried tomatoes or 6 sun-dried tomatoes, chopped
  • ¼ cup red onion, thinly sliced
  • 10 basil leaves, chopped
  • 4 large whole wheat flour tortilla
  • 3/4 pound sliced smoked turkey breast
  • 4 lettuce leaves, green leaf, Bibb or Romaine, shredded

1. In a small mixing bowl, combine the cream cheese, sun-dried tomatoes and basil.
2. Lay the tortillas out and spread 1 tablespoon of the cream cheese mixture on each of them. Divide the turkey among the tortillas and spread the remaining cream cheese mixture on top of the turkey. Divide the shredded lettuce among the tortillas and tightly roll each tortilla into a cylinder, ending with the seam side down.(The wraps can be made ahead and stored in the refrigerator.)
3. Cut the wraps in half on the diagonal and serve. 4 servings.

Garlic Shrimp with Sun-Dried Tomatoes - Gambas al Ajillo con Tomates

Shrimp With Sun-Dried Tomatoes

Yield: 4 to 6 servings.

  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil or jarred sun-dried tomato oil
  • Several sprigs thyme
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1 cup sun-dried tomatoes, roughly chopped
  • 2 tablespoons capers, drained if necessary
  • 1/2 cup fish stock or dry white wine
  • 16 to 24 large shrimp, peeled
  • Salt and pepper
  • Chopped fresh basil.

Put oil in a large, oven proof skillet over medium heat and add thyme, garlic, tomatoes and capers. Cook just until mixture sizzles, then add stock or wine; raise heat and bring to a boil. Cook for about a minute, then add shrimp, turning them in sauce. Cook just until they turn pink. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, garnish with basil, and serve hot or warm with Italian bread.

Dinner

 

Italian Pork Tenderloin

4 Servings

  • 1.5 lb. pork tenderloin
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 6 fresh sage leaves
  • 4 slices of prosciutto
  • 6 sun-dried tomatoes
  • Olive oil for brushing meat; salt and pepper
  • 1 tablespoon honey mustard, or mustard of choice

Pre-heat oven to 450 degrees F. Oil a baking dish just large enough to fit the pork tenderloin. Make the stuffing. Put the oil, sage, prosciutto and sun-dried tomatoes in a food processor. Pulse this mixture a few times until it is combined to a thick paste.

Cut a slit through the middle of your pork, but don’t go through to the bottom and with your hands, spread the stuffing onto the center of the meat. Close the pocket.
Tie together with kitchen twine to secure. Rub the tenderloin with olive oil, kosher salt and pepper.

Place meat in prepared baking dish. Roast the pork at 450 degrees F.  for 15 minutes, then turn the oven down to 350 degrees F. and cook another 30 minutes. Pork should be 160 degrees when done. Let the meat rest  for 5 minutes so the juices can distribute evenly before slicing. Remove the string.

To make a simple pan sauce, use the drippings in the pan and whisk in a tablespoon of honey mustard. There won’t be a lot of sauce, but enough to drizzle over the pork slices.

    

Orecchiette with Broccoli Rabe, Sun Dried Tomatoes and White Beans

Serves 6 to 8

  • 1 pound orecchiette pasta
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
  • 1 bunch broccoli rabe, stems removed, leaves chopped
  • 1 cup oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes (about 12 pieces), sliced
  • 1 (15-ounce) can cannellini beans, rinsed or 2 cups cooked dried beans
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil; add pasta and cook until al dente according to package directions. Reserve a cup of the pasta cooking water and drain pasta thoroughly.

Meanwhile, in a large sauté pan over high heat, heat olive oil. Add garlic and cook until fragrant but not browned, about 1 minute. Add half the broccoli rabe and sauté until lightly wilted but not brown, about 2 minutes. Add remaining broccoli rabe to pan and cook for another minute or two. Add sun-dried tomatoes and cannellini beans and toss lightly. Taste and adjust seasoning with salt and pepper.

Add hot drained pasta to the pan (or to a larger bowl if needed) and toss with the vegetables. Stir and add a few tablespoons of reserved pasta cooking water if mixture seems dry. Season and taste again. Serve immediately with freshly grated Parmesan cheese.

Chicken & Sun-Dried Tomato Orzo

Fish fillets may also be substituted in place of chicken. Serve with sautéed fresh spinach.
4 servings

  • 8 ounces orzo, preferably whole-grain
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 cup chopped sun-dried tomatoes,oil-packed, divided
  • 2 clove garlic, peeled
  • 3 teaspoons chopped fresh marjoram or oregano, divided
  • 2 tablespoon red-wine vinegar
  • 4 teaspoons sun-dried tomato oil, (reserved from sun-dried tomato jar )
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, trimmed (1 1/4 pounds)
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 1- 9-ounce package frozen artichoke hearts, thawed
  • 1/2 cup finely shredded Pecorino-Romano cheese, divided
  1. Cook orzo in a large saucepan of boiling water until just tender, 8 to 10 minutes or according to package directions. Drain.
  2. Meanwhile, place  water, 1/2 cup sun-dried tomatoes, garlic, 2 teaspoons marjoram, vinegar and  sun-dried tomato oil in a blender. Blend until just a few chunks remain.
  3. Season chicken with salt and pepper on both sides. Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the chicken and cook, adjusting the heat as necessary to prevent burning, until golden outside and no longer pink in the middle, 3 to 5 minutes per side. Transfer to a plate; tent with foil to keep warm.
  4. Pour the tomato sauce into the pan and bring to a boil. Measure out 1/2 cup sauce to a small bowl. Add the remaining sun-dried tomatoes to the pan along with the orzo, artichoke hearts and 6 tablespoons cheese. Cook, stirring, until heated through, 1 to 2 minutes. Divide among 4 plates.
  5. Slice the chicken. Top each portion of orzo with sliced chicken, 2 tablespoons of the reserved tomato sauce and a sprinkling of the remaining cheese and marjoram.


Sun Ripened Dried Tomatoes in Olive Oil



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NO DESPAIR WITH LIFE AND NO LIFE WITH DESPAIR . Email: dr.fawzyclinic2019@yahoo.com

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