Healthy Mediterranean Cooking at Home

Category Archives: scallopini

Pumpkin Decorations in a Piazza in Rome.

Just a few decades ago Halloween in Italy was merely the name of an American holiday. Little by little Halloween’s popularity has grown, probably due to the influence of American movies and American fast food chains. It has become a real celebrated holiday, even though it doesn’t have any real connection to Italy. All Saints Day (November 1st) is celebrated there as a national holiday and November 2nd, a day dedicated to the remembrance of the dead, is a holy day during which people visit cemeteries and bring flowers and candles to remember relatives and friends who have passed away.

In some parts of Italy children find presents brought during the night by the dead. The general practice of leaving food out for spirits on Hallows’ Eve seems to have spawned the tradition of distributing candy or other food. For many Italians, the origin of Halloween matters less than the chance to celebrate another festa (party). Much like in America, children in Italy enjoy dressing up and walking from store to store through town asking, “Dolcetto o scherzetto?” (Trick or treat?)

In Italy, Halloween involves costume parties for young adults and shops are beginning to sell decorations and even a variety of Halloween costumes (although the selection is still mostly limited to bats, ghosts or witches). While many of Italy’s Halloween traditions are similar to America, there are some that are uniquely Italian. To experience a distinctly Italian Halloween, visit the small hill town of Corinaldo in the Marche region for La Notte delle Streghe – The Night of the Witches.

Throughout Italy you will often see carved pumpkins, children in costumes running through the piazza and signs for Halloween parties at local restaurants or clubs. Some areas offer Halloween tours of medieval towers, castles and catacombs that are lined with mummies and bones. Celebrations are now widespread enough that it’s safe to say Halloween has been adopted into the Italian culture. The concern of traditionalists is that it has replaced the more traditional religious practices.

Halloween in Florence

The tradition of the pumpkin is not exclusively Anglo-Saxon, in fact, it can also be found in the Italian tradition. In Veneto, for example, pumpkins are emptied, painted and a candle symbolizing resurrection is placed inside them. In Friuli, especially in the area near Pordenone, the pumpkins, prepared in this way, are put along the roads to light the path for the dead. In Puglia every family adorns their own pumpkin and puts it on display in the window of their house. In Lombardia pumpkins are filled with wine, so that the dead can drink it during the night between the 31st October and the 1st of November, before returning to the kingdom of “afterlife”.

The traditions also include typical dishes prepared during this time and handed down from generation to generation. In Romagna, a region well known for its cuisine, the “piada dei morti”, a round flatbread filled with nuts, almonds, raisins and the red wine of Romagna, Sangiovese, is prepared. Another sweet prepared during this time is the “fava dei morti”, a little biscuit made of almonds. In Sicily the typical dishes for this time of year are the “pupi ‘i zuccuru”, a sweet bread shaped like little dolls, and the “dead bones” biscuits having the shape of bones that are particularly hard to bite.

Favorite Halloween Foods In Italy 

Pumpkin Soup

Servings 6

Ingredients

  • 4 lb pumpkin
  • 2 oz grated Parmigiano Reggiano cheese
  • 2 tablespoons parsley, chopped
  • 4 basil leaves
  • 1 stalk celery
  • 2 sprigs thyme
  • 1 clove of garlic, left whole
  • Vegetable broth
  • 1 oz butter
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Balsamic Vinegar of Modena

Directions

Cut off the top cap of the pumpkin, remove all the seeds and filaments keeping the pumpkin whole. You will form a sort of soup tureen complete with its lid.

Melt the butter in a small pan over medium heat. Add chopped celery, parsley, basil and thyme. Cook for 2 to 3 minutes.

Fill the pumpkin 3/4th of the way up with vegetable broth, the sautéed vegetables, peeled garlic and the grated cheese. Add salt and pepper to taste. Stir well and cover the pumpkin with its top and place on a baking sheet.

Bake at 450° F for two hours. Remove the pumpkin from the oven, remove the top and let cool. Remove the garlic and, with a serving spoon scrape the pumpkin off the sides and bottom, mixing it slowly into the soup, to make a puree.

Should the puree be too thick, add some more hot stock to it. Serve in soup bowls with a couple of drops of balsamic vinegar and large pieces of shaved Parmigiano Reggiano.

 

Veal and Pumpkin Rolls

You can use turkey or chicken scaloppine in place of the veal.

Servings 4

Ingredients

  • 16 veal scaloppine, about 1.5 oz each, pounded thin
  • 1 lb pumpkin, peeled and sliced
  • 1 lb chicory
  • 1 ¼ oz almonds, sliced
  • ½ an onion
  • All-purpose flour
  • 1 ½ oz grated Parmigiano Reggiano cheese
  • White wine to taste
  • Butter
  • Extra virgin olive oil to taste
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

Gently saute the onion in 2 tablespoons of olive oil until lightly golden and then add the pumpkin slices.

Salt and pepper the pumpkin and cook over low heat for 20 minutes, covered. Mash the pumpkin into a puree and add the grated Parmesan. Set aside.

Place the pounded slices of veal on a work surface and spread each one with pumpkin puree. Roll them up tightly and roll in flour.

Melt 2 tablespoons of butter in a skillet and brown veal rolls, about 6 minutes. You may need more butter.

Add enough wine to cover the bottom of the pan and allow it to evaporate. Cover the pan and cook the veal rolls for 6-8 minutes more.

Finely chop the chicory and add it to a skillet containing 1 tablespoon of olive oil; add the almonds and salt and pepper. Cook until the chicory wilts.

Serve the veal rolls over the chicory mixture.

Bonz of the Dead

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup hazelnuts
  • 3/4 teaspoon anise seeds
  • 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar
  • 1/4 cup unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • Zest of 1 lemon
  • 2 egg whites, at room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • Pinch ground cloves
  • Pinch kosher salt
  • Powdered sugar, for dusting

Directions

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees F and toast the hazelnuts on a sheet pan until lightly golden-brown, 15 to 20 minutes. Cool

Lightly toast the anise seeds either in the oven or on the stove in a saute pan over medium heat constantly shaking the pan, 3 to 4 minutes. Remove the seeds from the pan, allow to cool, and set aside.

Grind the hazelnuts in a food processor pulsing until the mixture looks like coarse cornmeal. Pour into a bowl and set aside. Grind the anise seeds in a small spice grinder until the seeds are half their size and place in the bowl with the nuts.

In the bowl of a electric stand mixer with a paddle attachment, cream the sugar, butter and lemon zest until light and fluffy, 3 to 4 minutes. Add the egg whites and vanilla and mix on low speed until incorporated, 1 to 2 minutes.

In the bowl with the ground hazelnuts and anise, add the flour, cinnamon, black pepper, cloves and salt and mix with your hands until combined. Add the dry mixture to the wet mixture in the mixer on low speed until a smooth ball of dough forms, 1 to 2 minutes. Remove the dough from the bowl, flatten slightly and wrap the dough in plastic wrap. Chill for 30 minutes.

Divide the cold dough into 8 even pieces. Roll each piece into a rope approximately 18-inches long by about 1/2-inch thick. Cut the ropes into 5 cookies. For super long bonz, roll each log 8-inches long.

Place the bonz on parchment lined baking sheets and allow to sit uncovered in a dry place, 1 to 2 hours or up to overnight. This helps them become super dry and ready for baking.

Place the baking sheets in a preheated 350 degree F oven and bake until golden brown, 12 to 15 minutes.

Remove from the oven and allow to cool completely on a wire rack. Dust with powdered sugar before serving.

Pan Dei Morti

or Bread of the Dead

Said to be based on an ancient Etruscan recipe, this particular recipe is a specialty of the Lombardia region of Italy. These cookies are best eaten the day they are baked, although they keep well for several days. They are dense, chewy, moist cookies with the crackle of the ground cookies and the crunch of the pine nuts to remind us of dead men’s bones.

Ingredients

  • 14 oz (400 g) dry, sweet cookies, such as crunchy ladyfingers
  • 3 ½ oz (100 g) dry amaretti cookies
  • 4 ¼ oz (120 g) blanched whole almonds
  • 4 ¼ oz (120 g) dried figs
  • 2 cups (250 g) flour
  • 1 ½ cups (300 g) sugar
  • ½ cup (50 g) unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • pinch salt
  • 4 ¼ oz (125 g) whole pine nuts
  • 6 large egg whites
  • 3/8 cup (100 ml) Vin Santo or other sweet dessert wine 
  • powdered sugar for dusting

Directions

In a processor finely grind the cookies and amaretti and place in a very large mixing bowl. Finely grind both the almonds and the figs and add to the cookie crumbs in the bowl.

(The damp figs may clump together, just rub the clumps into the dry ingredients to break it up.)

Add the flour, sugar, cocoa powder, baking powder, cinnamon, nutmeg, salt and whole pine nuts to the ground ingredients and toss until completely blended.

Pour the egg whites and the vin santo or dessert wine over the dry ingredients and blend until all of the dry ingredients are moistened.

Scrape out onto a floured work surface and knead quickly until it you have a smooth, well-blended ball of cookie dough.

Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C). Line baking sheets with non-stick parchment paper.

Slice the ball of dough in half and then each half into about a dozen even pieces, each weighing about 3-3 ½ oz (90-100 g).

Form each piece into an oblong shape –  long and flat, approximately 4 ½ – 5 ½ inches (12-14 cm) long and approximately 2 ½ inches (6 cm) wide, (wider in the middle and narrowing to a point at each end).

Place the cookies on the baking sheet leaving a little space between each. Bake for 35-30 minutes until slightly puffed, a dull brown color and set to the touch. Lift one up carefully and check that the bottom side looks cooked. Do not overbake or the cookies will be too hard.

Remove the cookies to cooling racks and allow the cookies to cool completely. Once cooled, sift powdered sugar generously to cover the cookies.

 

Fave dei Morti

Fave dei Morti, beans of the dead, are little bean-shaped cakes that Italians eat on Il Giorno dei Morti (All Souls’ Day) on November 2. These small cakes are traditionally eaten throughout Italy on the day that everyone decorates the graves with flowers and prays for departed souls.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 1/2 cup finely ground almonds (unblanched)
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tablespoons all purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon grated lemon rind

Directions

Combine sugar, butter and ground almonds. Beat egg and add to the butter ingredients, mixing thoroughly. Add flour and lemon rind.

Work dough until smooth and form into a roll about 1 1/2 inches in diameter. Wrap in waxed paper and refrigerate 2-3 hours.

Cut off bits of dough and mold into kidney-shaped pieces about as big as large lima beans.

Bake on greased cookie sheets in a moderate oven (350° F.) about 15-20 minutes, or until golden brown. Cool 5 minutes before removing from the pan with spatula to a cooling rack.


Bologna is well-known for its food, architecture, music and for its independent political thinking, and is now regarded to be one of the most attractive cities in Italy. Bologna is the capital of the Emilia-Romagna region in northern Italy and is less than an hour inland from the east coast, about halfway between Florence and Milan. Nearby cities of interest include Modena and Ravenna.

The history of Bologna began with the Etruscans. In the VI century B.C., the city bore the Etruscan name “Felsina”.  Later the Romans renamed the city Bononia, from which the current name, Bologna, is derived.  At its peak, it was the second city of Italy, and one of the most important of all the Empire, with various temples and baths, a theatre, and an arena. Pomponius Mela, author of A Description of the World, included Bononia among the five wealthiest cities of Italy. Although fire damaged the city during the reign of Claudius, the Roman Emperor Nero rebuilt it in the 1st century AD.

In 1088, the Studio, later known as the University of Bologna, was founded and could boast notable scholars of the Middle Ages in attendance, such as, Irnerius, Dante, Boccaccio and Petrarca. The university received a charter from Frederick I Barbarossa in 1158, but in the 19th century, a committee of historians led by Giosuè Carducci traced the founding of the University back to 1088, which would make it the oldest university in the world.

University of Bologna

Two Towers

In the Medieval period, Bologna was an important and thriving city. Between the XII and XIV centuries, some of the city’s most important buildings were constructed: among these were the Two Towers, the traditional symbol of the city, the Basilica of San Petronio and King Enzo’s Palace.

In 1256, Bologna passed the Legge del Paradiso (“Paradise Law”), which abolished feudal serfdom and freed the slaves, using public money. At that time the city centre was full of towers (perhaps 180), built by the leading families, notable public edifices, churches, and abbeys. It was the next most important city after Rome but, always, managed to maintain relative autonomy. In the XVII and XVIII century, the city expanded, above its outside walls. In the middle of the XVIII century, the Portico of San Luca was built. 

Bologna is also a city famous for its painters, such as the Carracci brothers, Guido Reni and, in the XX century, Giorgio Morandi, in which his famous still life works are exhibited at the Giorgio Morandi Museum, inside the Town Hall (Palazzo Comunale).

The Bolognese are also known for their fierce independence; throughout history the city’s rebellions against the papal rulers and injustice illustrates this spirit. Even today, you are sure to see locals in heated political discussion and debates about the day’s topics.

San Luca is the world’s longest continuous portico, a covered walkway of 666 arches more than two miles long

Bologna Nightlife:

Bologna has a rich music heritage, where music plays a significant part in everyday life. The city of Bologna is an important place for Italian and international events and festivals. The city hosts the International Composition competition in August, dedicated to the memory of the victims of the Bologna railway station slaughter in 1980, the European Jazz Festival and the Bologna Festival, dedicated to classical, baroque and contemporary music. It is also the seat of “Angelica”, an international festival of contemporary music and of the Zecchino d’Oro Festival (children’s choir festival). Additional summertime entertainment options include a daily open-air disco in Parco Cavaioni on the outskirts of the city and the city-sponsored Bologna Sogna series, with concerts at museums and buildings around town. During the rest of the year, nightlife events abound for young people in the university area.

The Food of Bologna:

The cuisine of the Emilia-Romagna region is one of the best in Italy and some of Italy’s most famous foods come from this region. Handmade egg pasta and stuffed pasta, especially tortellini, are specialties of Bologna and, of course, there is the famous Ragu alla Bolognese, a long cooked meat sauce. In truth, there probably isn’t one authentic recipe for bolognese sauce.  (See my post for my version:  https://jovinacooksitalian.com/2012/04/21/two-sauces-for-everyday-meals/)  Bologna is also known for its salami, ham and cheese.  

D.O.P stands for “Denominazione di Origine Protetta”, which means Protected Designation of Origin.  The D.O.P designation guarantees that the products come from a certain location in Italy. Also, the methods of production must be traditional, and have fixed storage guidelines.

Parma ham (also known as Posciutto Crudo di Parma) –  (D.O.P.)  This is ham that’s been salted for several weeks, rather than cooked. It has a melt-in-your-mouth texture, and it’s made — of course — in Parma.

The home of Prosciutto di Parma and other meat delicacies.

Mortadella di Bologna. Spiced pork from Bologna. This is where we get our word “bologna” from, but this is not the supermarket lunchmeat. 

Mortadella di Bologna IGP

Parmigiano Reggiano.  A D.O.P. protected cheese, made in Parma and Reggio Emilia.  You might know it as “parmesan.” However, unless you’re holding the D.O.P-protected Parmigiano-Reggiano in your hands, you’re not really tasting the real thing.

Balsamic vinegar of Modena. One of the region’s most world-famous foods, D.O.P. protected balsamic vinegar can only be made in Modena, which is in Emilia-Romagna.  It is especially good drizzled over some Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese Look for it on pastas, too. One thing Emilia-Romagna does very well is mixing sweet and savory, such as a pasta filled with pears, Parmigiano Reggiano, and drizzled with balsamic vinegar.

Calamari ripieni di calamaretti. Small squid are chopped, seasoned, mixed with rice, and used to stuff – large squids.

Asparagi ravennati.  Famous asparagus of Ravenna. Look for it in risotto.

Anguilla alla ravennate. Eel sautéed in butter with tomatoes, and a specialty in Ravenna.

Piselli alla pancetta. Peas cooked with pancetta (a salt-cured, spiced Italian bacon), sometimes with mixed with pasta.

Lasagna. Some Bolognese claim that lasagna was invented here. Regardless of where exactly it originated, the version made in Bologna is one of the best.

Tortellini. The pasta that has become a favorite worldwide — those little pouches filled with cheese or, in some cases, meats (although that’s usually for their larger cousin, tortelloni) — was invented in the Emilia-Romagna region. And some fascinating legends are connected with how it got its start. Our story: While traveling, the pope’s daughter Lucrezia Borgia checked into the small town of Castelfranco Emilia, near Modena. The innkeeper was captivated by Lucrezia, and in the night, he couldn’t help himself — he peeked through the keyhole into her room. All he saw… was her navel. In typical Italian fashion, he turned his desire into inspiration, making a new pasta in the shape of Lucrezia’s navel in homage. A second story: to the Bolognese, the shape of tortellini was inspired by the female navel. One story, hailing from the 17th century, claims that tortellini was created by a cook who molded the pasta in the navel of a Bolognese woman.

Capellettacci. Pasta filled with chocolate-flavored chestnuts and served with olive oil and pepper.

Tagliatelle alla Bolognese. Not exactly what we think of when we think “Bolognese sauce,” this is a thick ragu of onions, carrots, pork, veal, and with just a little bit of tomato.

Amaretti or amarelle. Almond-flavored macaroons, a specialty of Modena. Today, bakeries throughout the region, and in Italian communities around the world, carry Amaretti di Saronno, but it’s worth the (small) effort to make them yourself. The recipe is simple, and fresh from the oven, they have a crisp-yet-tender texture that’s beyond compare.

Pampepato di cioccolato. A Christmastime cake made of cocoa, milk, honey, spices, almonds and lemon peel, then covered with candy-studded chocolate frosting. It dates back to the 15th century, and an 11-pound version was even given by the city of Ferrara to General Eisenhower during the World War II.

Bologna Inspired Recipes For You To Make At Home

Lunch

Onion Frittata                                                                                                                                                                  

The key to making this dish is to have all the ingredients prepared before you begin sautéing the onions.

4-6 Servings

Ingredients:

  • 8 large eggs or 4 whole eggs and 1 cup egg substitute
  • 1/2 cup finely grated Parmesan
  • 3 large fresh basil leaves, torn into pieces
  • 3 large fresh sage leaves, minced
  • 1 teaspoon minced fresh rosemary
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 cup thinly sliced onion
  • 1/3 cup skim milk ricotta

Directions:

Preheat oven to 400°F.  Whisk first 7 ingredients in a medium bowl; set aside. Heat oil in a medium ovenproof nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add onion; sauté until soft, about 6 minutes. Reduce heat to low. Stir in egg mixture. Spoon dollops of ricotta evenly over.

Cook until frittata begins to set, about 2 minutes. Place in oven; bake until just set, 7-9 minutes. Slide the frittata onto a platter. Cut into wedges; serve hot or at room temperature.

Shaved Fennel Salad in Balsamic Vinaigrette                                                                                                                           shaved-fennel-salad                    

The balsamic dressing below is quite versatile; try it with baby greens or grilled vegetables.

Make a double batch and refrigerate leftovers for up to 2 weeks.

 Serves 6

Ingredients:

  • 2 shallots, very thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon minced oregano leaves or 1 teaspoon dried 
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar (Aceto Balsamico Tradizionale di Modena)
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 fennel bulbs, trimmed, quartered, and sliced paper-thin
  • 6 oz mixed baby greens or arugula

Directions:

Place the shallots, oregano, balsamic vinegar, olive oil, salt, and pepper in jar. Close with a tight-fitting lid and shake to blend.
Pour the dressing over the fennel in a bowl. Toss, taste for salt, adjust if needed, and marinate for 15 minutes. Serve over a bed of baby greens or arugula.

Dinner

Bologna-Style Pork Chops

These pork chops with prosciutto and cheese are somewhat more involved than some other pork chops, but will be a delightful surprise at the table, and are well suited to company.

6 servings 

Ingredients:

  • 6 (3/4 inch) bone on pork chops
  • 6 slices of prosciutto
  • 6 slices fontina cheese
  • 2 bay leaves
  • A clove of garlic, minced
  • 2 sprigs of fresh rosemary, leaves stripped and minced
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • Salt & freshly ground pepper

Directions:

Trim all the gristle and fat from the cutlets, then split them in half, leaving the halves attached only along the bone, so that the cutlets will open like a book.

Open the pork and fill each with a piece of prosciutto and a piece of cheese, trimming their edges so nothing sticks out.

In a skillet large enough for all the pork chops to lie flat, heat the oil with the bay leaves. Place the pork chops into the pan and brown them on both sides, turning them carefully. Season the meat with the minced garlic, herbs, salt, and pepper, cover, and cook over a medium-low heat for about 15 minutes, turning the meat occasionally.

Agnolotti With Sage Butter 

Some agnolotti pasta are square or rectangular in shape, while others, especially from Bologna form a half-moon circle.

A quick way to achieve small stuffed pastas without all the kitchen labor, is to cheat a little, by using Wonton (what Chinese!) wrappers.  Not authentic but quick and tastes like the real thing.

Servings: 6                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

Ingredients

  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 4 ounces ground beef
  • 2 ounces ground pork
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped fresh spinach leaves
  • 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
  • salt, to taste
  • ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1 egg or 1/4 cup egg substitute
  • 42 wonton wrappers (square or round)
  • 1/4 cup unsalted butter or Smart Balance Blend
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh sage

Directions:

Heat oil in heavy large skillet over medium-high heat. Add beef and pork; saute until brown, about 3 minutes. Add spinach and saute until wilted and liquid has evaporated, about 3 minutes. Cool.

Finely chop mixture in the processor. Transfer to a medium bowl. Mix in cheese. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Mix in egg.

Lightly flour a baking sheet. Arrange 12 wonton wrappers on work surface, keeping the rest covered with a towel to prevent dryness. Spoon 1 teaspoon filling in center of each. Brush edges with water. Fold each wrapper in half, forming a triangle or rectangle. Press edges together and form into desired shapes. Transfer to the floured baking sheet. Repeat with remaining wrappers and filling. (Can be made 8 hours ahead. Cover with plastic wrap; chill.).

Melt butter in heavy medium skillet over low heat. Add sage; remove from heat and keep warm.

Meanwhile, working in batches, cook Agnolotti in a large pot of boiling salted water until just tender but still firm to bite, about 3 minutes. Using slotted spoon, transfer Agnolotti to shallow soup bowls. Drizzle with sage butter and serve.

 

Chicken Scallopini with Balsamic Vinegar and Basil

After the scaloppine are browned in olive oil, the pan is deglazed with chicken stock and balsamic vinegar to create a rich sauce. Add a 1/2 pound of mushrooms with the shallots if you like this addition.

 Serves 4

Ingredients:

  • 4 chicken scallopini (about 4 ounces each), pounded thin with a mallet, see post on how to prepare scallopini: https://jovinacooksitalian.com/2012/05/09/how-many-ways-can-i-make-scallopini/
  • 1/4 cup unbleached all-purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 shallots, minced
  • 1/2 pound sliced mushrooms, optional
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/2 cup chicken broth
  • 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar (Aceto Balsamico Tradizionale di Modena)
  • 1/4 cup basil leaves, torn

Directions:

Dredge the scaloppine in the flour, shaking off excess. Heat the olive oil in a 12-inch skillet. Add the scaloppine in a single layer. Season with salt and pepper.

Cook until golden on the bottom, about 2 minutes; turn. Cook on the other side until golden, about 2 minutes. Remove to a platter; cover with foil to keep warm.

Add the shallots (and mushrooms, if using) and garlic to the skillet; cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Add the broth and reduce over high heat for 1 minute, scraping up any browned bits from the bottom of the skillet. Add the balsamic vinegar; cook until the sauce reduces and becomes syrupy, about 1 minute. Stir in the basil, return the chicken to the skillet, and turn a few times to coat with the sauce and to warm through. Serve hot. 

Tagliatelle with Prosciutto and Orange                                                                                                         

4 servings

Ingredients:

  • Kosher salt
  • 12 oz. egg tagliatelle or fettuccine (preferably fresh)
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 2 oz. thinly sliced prosciutto, torn into 1″ pieces
  • Zest and juice of 1 orange
  • 1/2 cup fat-free half and half
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 cup finely grated Parmesan

Directions:

Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Season with salt; add pasta and cook, stirring occasionally, until 1 minute before al dente, (about 2 minutes for fresh pasta), longer for dried. Drain, reserving 1/4 cup pasta cooking water.

Meanwhile, melt butter in a large heavy nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add prosciutto; sauté until browned, about 3 minutes.

Add reserved pasta water, orange juice, half of the orange zest and half and half; bring to a simmer. Add pasta; cook, stirring, until sauce coats the pasta, about 1 minute. Season with salt and pepper. Stir in cheese and divide among warm bowls. Sprinkle remaining orange zest over pasta.


To parody the song from the Broadway show, Annie Get Your Gun, “Anything you can do with veal, I can do better with turkey”

Menu 1

Roman-Style Saltimbocca

turkeycutlets1

This traditional Roman dish is classically made with veal but can also be made with turkey.

Serves 4

Ingredients        

  • 4 boneless turkey cutlets (about 4 ounces each)
  • Salt and black pepper
  • 8 thin slices prosciutto
  • 8 sage leaves, more for garnish
  • 3/4 cup flour
  • 2 tablespoons butter, divided
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • 1/2 cup low-sodium chicken broth
  • Lemon wedges     

Directions:

Sprinkle each cutlet lightly with salt and pepper. Top with a slice of prosciutto and a sage leaf.
Place cutlets between 2 sheets of parchment, waxed paper or plastic wrap. With a mallet or rolling-pin, gently pound cutlets to an even 1/4-inch thickness, pounding the prosciutto and sage into the cutlets.

Spread the flour on a shallow plate and dip the cutlets in it, lightly coating both sides.
Heat a tablespoon of butter and the olive oil in a large pan. When the butter begins to foam, add the cutlets to the pan, prosciutto side down. Cook 3 to 4 minutes per side, turning once, until lightly browned and cooked through. Transfer to a platter and cover to keep warm.
Add wine to the hot pan and stir with a wooden spoon to loosen all the brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Let the wine reduce by half, then add the chicken broth and reduce again.
Remove the pan from the heat and swirl in remaining tablespoon of butter. Taste and adjust seasoning with salt and pepper, then pour over the reserved cutlets. Serve immediately with lemon wedges.

Cacio e Pepe Pasta

Ingredients

  • Kosher salt, to taste
  • 1 pound spaghetti
  • 4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons freshly cracked black pepper
  • 1 1/2 cups finely grated Pecorino Romano cheese

Directions

Bring a 6-qt. pot of salted water to a boil. Add pasta; cook until al dente, 8–10 minutes; reserve 1 cup pasta water and drain pasta.

Meanwhile, heat oil in a 12″ skillet over medium heat until shimmering. Add pepper; cook until fragrant, 1–2 minutes. Ladle 3⁄4 cup pasta water into skillet; bring to a boil. Using tongs, transfer pasta to skillet; spread it evenly.

Sprinkle the Pecorino Romano cheese over pasta; toss vigorously to combine until sauce is creamy and clings to the pasta without clumping, about 2 minutes, adding some pasta water if necessary. Transfer to serving bowl.

Garlic Green Beans

4 Servings

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/4 pounds green beans, trimmed
  • 1/4 cup chopped flat-leaf parsley
  • 1 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
  • 1 ounce (about 2 tablespoons) toasted almonds,
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 large cloves garlic, minced
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

Directions:

Bring a large pot of water to a boil.  When the water comes to a boil, salt generously and add the green beans. Boil for four minutes, then drain and dry on a kitchen towel.

Mix together the parsley, lemon zest and almonds in a small bowl. Heat the oil over medium heat in the same pan used for the green beans and add the garlic. As soon as it begins to sizzle, stir in the beans. Toss for about a minute until the beans are coated with oil and cooked garlic, then stir in the parsley mixture. Stir for a minute, and season to taste with salt and pepper.

Transfer the beans to a platter or serving dish, scrape the almond mixture remaining in the pan over the top and serve.

Menu 2

Sautéed Scaloppine with Tomato Vinaigrette

turkeycutlets4

Serves 4

Ingredients:

  • 4 boneless turkey cutlets, about 6 ounces each
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • salt to taste
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • flour for dredging
  • 1 cup Tomato Vinaigrette (see recipe below)

Directions:

1. Prepare the Tomato Vinaigrette. Keep the vinaigrette warm.
2. Lay the turkey between two pieces of waxed paper, and flatten each cutlet with the flat end of a mallet until thin.
3. Heat the olive oil in a large, nonstick skillet until hot. Season the cutlets with salt and pepper and dredge it in flour. Sauté the turkey over high heat, about 1 minute on each side. Remove to a warm platter and serve, topped with the vinaigrette.

Tomato Vinaigrette                                                                                                                                                                   

Makes 2 Cups

Ingredients

  • 1 3/4 cups (14 oz.)Pomi strained tomatoes 
  • salt to taste
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 3 tablespoons chopped, fresh basil or dill
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

Directions

Place the tomatoes, vinegar and salt in a saucepan. Bring to a boil and reduce the mixture to a thick consistency, about 5 minutes. Remove from the heat, place the sauce in a glass container and cool over ice.
Place the mustard and lemon juice in a food processor. With the machine running, add the basil and olive oil. Add the cooled tomato mixture and puree until smooth.
The vinaigrette can be stored in the refrigerator for 1 week.

Fennel Layered with Potatoes and Bread Crumbs

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds Yukon Gold potatoes
  • 1 large fennel bulb, trimmed (3/4 to 1 lb. after trimming)
  • 1 cup firmly packed fresh breadcrumbs
  • 1/2 cup freshly grated Pecorino Romano  or Parmigiano-Reggiano Cheese
  • 3 tablespoons finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 2 medium cloves garlic, minced
  • 5 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2-1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Directions:

Peel the potatoes and slice them as thinly as possible, about an 1/8 inch thick. Put the sliced potatoes in a large bowl of cold water to keep them from browning.

Cut the fennel in half lengthwise. Slice the fennel crosswise as thinly as possible, about an 1/8 inch thick. You should have about 4 cups.

In a another bowl, combine the breadcrumbs, cheese, parsley, and garlic. Mix well with your hands, making sure the garlic is evenly distributed.

Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 400ºF. Lightly spray the bottom and sides of a 9×13-inch baking dish with olive oil cooking spray.

Without draining the potatoes, use your hands to lift out about one-third of the slices and arrange them in the bottom of the baking dish, overlapping them slightly. (The water clinging to them will generate steam as they bake and you will need less oil in this dish.)

Season with 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and a couple of grinds of the pepper. Sprinkle the potatoes evenly with 1/4 cup of the breadcrumb mixture. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon of the oil. Top the potatoes with half of the sliced fennel, spreading it evenly. Sprinkle the fennel with 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1/4 cup of the breadcrumb mixture, and 1 tablespoon of the oil.

Repeat this layering process, ending with a top layer of potatoes. Season the top layer with the remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt and some more pepper. Mix the remaining breadcrumb mixture with the final 1 tablespoon oil and sprinkle over the top of the casserole.

Cover the dish tightly with aluminum foil and bake for 40 minutes (be sure the aluminum foil is sealed tightly all around the baking dish, or there won’t be enough steam to cook the potatoes).

Uncover and continue baking until the potatoes are tender when pierced with a fork and the top is golden brown, 25 to 30 minutes longer. Let rest at least 10 minutes before serving.

Quick Broiled Asparagus

While the fennel potato casserole is resting, cook the asparagus in the broiler as described below.

Directions:

Take 1 bunch of asparagus and cut off the tough ends. Wash lightly and let dry completely.

Place asparagus on a cookie sheet or the bottom of a broiler pan.

Drizzle with 1 tablespoon of olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Move oven rack to the top and turn broiler on low. Cook for 5-10 minutes depending on thickness.

Menu 3

Turkey Cutlets with Mozzarella and Roasted Red Peppers

turkey-cutlets

Servings: 4                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             

Ingredients

  • 1 large roasted red bell pepper, cut into 4 wedges
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 4 (1/2-inch-thick) turkey breast cutlets (about 1 pound)
  • 2 teaspoons chopped fresh sage plus extra for garnish
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/2 cup (2 ounces) shredded part-skim mozzarella cheese
  • 1/4 cup dry Marsala wine
  • 1/4 cup fat-free, less-sodium chicken broth
  • 2 teaspoons butter
  • 3/4 pound Fettuccine or cooked rice

Directions

Cook pasta according to package instructions.

Heat oil in a saute pan over medium heat. Season turkey with chopped sage, salt, and pepper. Cook turkey in pan 2 1/2 minutes per side. Arrange peppers and cheese on top of turkey and pour Marsala and broth to pan. Place the lid on the pan and cook 45 seconds or until cheese is melted. Using a slotted spoon, remove turkey cutlets to a plate and keep warm.

Let Marsala mixture boil about 1 1/2 minutes or until liquid is reduced to 1/3 cup. Take pan off of heat and whisk in butter.  Place turkey cutlets over pasta on serving plates and spoon sauce over turkey.  Sprinkle with chopped sage.

Tip: to roast pepper:

Seed red bell pepper and cut into quarters. Lay pepper quarters, flesh side down on a foil covered baking sheet; broil 10 minutes or until skin is black. Put peppers in a plastic bag and let rest, sealed for 10 minutes; peel off skin.

Crispy Parmesan Broccoli

4 servings

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound broccoli, rinsed, dried, and cut into flat sided small pieces
  • 1/2 cup refrigerated egg substitute
  • 1/2 cup Panko Lemon Pepper Bread Crumbs
  • 1/2 cup Parmesan cheese, finely grated

Directions

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.

In a small bowl combine the bread crumbs and cheese.

Put the broccoli in a large bowl, add the egg substitute and toss with your hands to coat.

Sprinkle in the bread crumb and cheese mixture and toss to combine.

Transfer to a baking sheet, flat side down,  and roast for 12 minutes.

Menu 4

Turkey Osso Bucco

6 servings

Ingredients

  • 6 turkey thighs
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour, for dredging
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 large onion, finely diced
  • 2 carrots, finely diced
  • 2  celery stalks, finely diced
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1 1/2 cups dry white wine
  • 5-6 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth
  • 1 large sprig fresh rosemary
  • 2 large sprigs fresh thyme
  • 2 bay leaves

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.
Pat the turkey with paper towels to dry and ensure even browning. Season the turkey with salt and pepper. Dredge the turkey in the flour to coat.
In a heavy roasting pan large enough to fit the turkey thighs in a single layer, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the turkey and cook until brown on both sides, about 6 minutes per side. Transfer the turkey to a bowl and reserve.
In the same pan, add the onion, carrot, and celery. Season vegetables with salt. Cook until the vegetables are tender, about 6 minutes. Stir in the tomato paste and cook for 1 minute.
Stir in the wine and simmer until the liquid is reduced by half, about 3 minutes. Return the turkey to the pan. Add enough chicken broth to come 2/3 up the sides of the turkey. Add the herb sprigs and bay leaves to the broth mixture. Bring the liquid to a boil over medium-high heat. Remove the pan from the heat. Cover the pan tightly with foil and transfer to the oven. Braise until the turkey is fork-tender about 2 hours, turning the turkey after 1 hour.

Easy Parmesan Risotto

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups chicken broth
  • 2 cups water
  • 2 tablespoons butter, divided
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 large shallot, peeled and finely diced 
  • 2 cups Arborio Rice
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • 1 cup grated Parmesan Cheese
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • Salt and pepper

Directions:

Heat the broth and water ( total 6 cups) in a pot and keep warm.
In a heavy Dutch oven pan, heat 1 tablespoon of the butter and the oil and cook the shallot over medium heat until it is translucent.
Add the rice and stir to coat.
Add the wine, and cook over medium heat until the wine is almost absorbed.
Reduce the heat to medium low, and add 5 cups of the hot liquid.
Cook for 18 minutes stirring just twice during this period or until the rice is just al dente.
Add 1/2 cup of broth and stir constantly for 3 minutes until the rice is creamy, adding remaining broth if risotto isn’t loose enough.
To finish the dish add the Parmesan cheese, lemon juice, remaining butter and  salt and pepper to taste.  Mix well.

Green Peas

Defrost 1 package of frozen green peas but leave them in the plastic bag that encloses them.  Heat in the microwave on high in the bag for 3 minutes.  Pour into a serving bowl and toss with 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil and fresh cracked black pepper.

Menu 5

Braised Turkey Roulade with Pancetta, Shallots, and Porcini Sauce                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    

Serves 8   

This recipe can be cut in half to make 4 servings.  However, this is a good choice for an entrée when entertaining an would want to make the full amount.              

Ingredients

  • 2 cups boiling water
  • 3/4 cup dried porcini mushrooms (about 3/4 ounce)
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 3 1/2 ounces thinly sliced pancetta (about 9 slices), divided
  • 2 cups chopped shallots (about 10 ounces), divided
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary, divided
  • 1 teaspoon salt, divided
  • 3/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, divided
  • 2 (1 1/4-pound) skinless, boneless turkey breast halves
  • 1/2 cup coarsely chopped carrot
  • 1/2 cup coarsely chopped celery
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour (Wondra flour works well for sauces)

Directions

Combine 2 cups boiling water and porcini mushrooms in a bowl; cover and let stand for 15 minutes or until the mushrooms are soft. Drain through a sieve over a bowl, reserving soaking liquid. Chop the porcini mushrooms.

Heat a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add 1 1/2 teaspoons olive oil to pan, and swirl to coat. Coarsely chop 1 pancetta slice. Add chopped pancetta to pan; cook for 3 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add 1 3/4 cups shallots, 2 teaspoons rosemary, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and 1/4 teaspoon pepper; cook for 7 minutes or until shallots are tender, stirring occasionally. Stir in reserved mushrooms. Cool slightly.

Slice 1 turkey breast half lengthwise, cutting to, but not through, the other side. Open halves, laying turkey breast flat (like a book).
Place plastic wrap over turkey breast; pound to 1/2-inch thickness using a meat mallet or small heavy skillet. Spread half of shallot mixture over turkey breast; roll up jelly roll fashion, starting with long sides. Sprinkle with 1/4 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon pepper. Arrange 4 pancetta slices evenly on top of turkey roll. Secure at 2-inch intervals with twine.
Repeat procedure with remaining turkey breast half, shallot mixture, 1/4 teaspoon salt, 1/4 teaspoon pepper, and 4 pancetta slices.

Preheat oven to 325° F.

Heat a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add remaining 1 1/2 teaspoons oil to pan; swirl to coat. Add turkey rolls to the pan; cook 6 minutes or until browned, turning after 3 minutes. Add remaining 1/4 cup shallots, carrot, celery, and wine to pan. Bring to a boil; cook until liquid is reduced by half (about 2 minutes). Stir in reserved porcini liquid and remaining 2 1/2 teaspoons rosemary. Cover and bake at 325° for 40 minutes or until a thermometer inserted in thickest portion registers 160°. Remove turkey rolls from pan; let stand 15 minutes. Cut each roll crosswise into 12 slices.

Strain cooking liquid through a fine mesh sieve over a bowl; discard solids. Combine 1/4 cup water and flour, stirring with a whisk until smooth. Return remaining cooking liquid to pan; add flour mixture and remaining ¼ teaspoon salt, stirring with a whisk. Bring to a boil; cook 1 minute or until thickened, stirring constantly. Serve sauce with turkey slices.

Rice With Cheese

 4 servings.

Ingredients: 

  • Salt
  • 1 1/2 cups brown rice
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1/2 cup grated Fontina cheese
  • ¼ cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • Freshly coarsely ground cracked black pepper.

 Directions:

1. Bring a pot of water to a boil and add salt, just as you would to cook pasta. Add rice and stir. When water returns to a boil, lower heat and cook rice until tender but not mushy, about 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Drain in a fine mesh colander or line your colander with cheesecloth if the wholes in your colander are large enough for the rice to fit through.

2. Put butter in the same pan and turn heat to medium. When butter melts and just begins to turn brown, add rice and toss together. Stir in Fontina cheese, the Parmesan, along with freshly ground cracked pepper.

Parmesan Broiled Tomatoes

8 servings

Ingredients:

  • Cooking spray
  • 4 large beefsteak tomatoes
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 8 tablespoons shredded Parmesan cheese
  • 1 teaspoon minced garlic
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Directions:

Preheat the broiler.  Coat a baking sheet with cooking spray.

Halve the tomatoes crosswise (through the equator, not from stem to bottom). Place the tomatoes flesh-side up on the prepared pan and brush the tops with the olive oil. Season the top of each tomato with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Combine the Parmesan cheese and garlic and mix well to combine. Sprinkle the mixture on the top of each tomato.

Broil 5 to 7 minutes, until the tops are golden brown and tomatoes soften. Sprinkle the parsley over top just before serving.


When I was growing up, veal dishes were on our dinner table regularly and I know I did not even think about where veal came from in those days. My father would go to the butcher shop and bring home a couple of pounds of veal cutlets, proclaiming “how beautiful they were”. My mother usually breaded and fried the veal in oil; the basis for veal parmesan.  We usually just ate it as fried cutlets but occasionally with tomato sauce.  Most of the Parmesan style dishes are not found in Italy but have developed, over the years, into Italian-American cuisine.

In the first few months of my marriage, I decided to experiment with one of the veal scallopini dishes from my Ada Boni book. I made the Veal Scallopine with mushrooms and wine. My husband loved it; so I added it to my recipe box. Shortly after, we invited my in-laws for dinner and my husband wanted me to make this dish. I knew his mother liked Italian food but I wasn’t sure about his father. I asked what he liked to eat and my husband said he was “a meat and potatoes man”.  I thought, well, this will work. I always served it over pasta with 2 small cutlets per person, but I made a little extra that day and thought “just in case”.   When we sat down at the table for dinner, we passed the serving plates and my father-in law said he didn’t eat pasta. I said to my self, UH OH, as he proceeded to take several helpings of the veal and said , “it wasn’t bad.”  I was glad I made enough pasta for the rest of us.

Scallopine is an Italian dish made with thin ¼ inch slices of meat (traditionally veal) that are pounded with a mallet to approximately 1/8 of an inch. The veal used is generally taken from a muscle and is cut across the grain and trimmed of any fat. This makes veal scallopine a very low calorie cut of meat. Scaloppine is a fairly quick dish to prepare, since the thin slices of meat require very little cooking time. The classic veal scallopine is often dredged in flour with a few Italian herbs, salt and pepper, and then cooked in a skillet in oil and butter. There are a few traditional additions, such as capers and parsley and sometimes cooked mushrooms. White wine is added to the pan, once the meat is removed, to make a light sauce.

If lemon juice is added to scaloppine dishes then the dish would be called  piccata. Adding Marsala wine to scaloppine dishes is traditionally referred to as Veal Marsala. Using chicken or turkey breasts instead of veal can further reduce the fat content of veal scallopine; and if you reduce the amount of fat you cooked the meat in, you will have a healthy entree. Scallopini dishes are good quick fix dinners for busy weeknights. 

I know that veal is the traditional type of meat used in scallopini dishes in Italian cuisine but I prefer to use chicken, turkey, pork or fish in my recipes.  Animals were once confined to limit their movement; hence, the meat would be more tender and pale. In the past, Milk-fed veal came from calves up to 12 weeks old that had not been weaned from their mother’s milk, but veal of this quality is rare in today’s supermarket. Animal rights activists made the public aware of such practices in the 1980s.  For that reason, the consumption of veal was a source of controversy. In recent years, veal producers have attempted to make their system of production more humane.

Today, shoppers are more likely to find calves fed a nutritionally balanced milk or soy-based diet that is fortified with essential nutrients.  Many producers of veal are committed to animal friendly housing and humane treatment of their animals. The calves feed on a combination of milk and nutrient rich grains free of antibiotics. New facilities in America sometimes surpass strict European humanely raised standards. While the old veal was white and bland, the new veal is pink and flavorful.  Although veal is supposed to be leaner and more tender than beef, not all veal is made equally, and not all cuts carry the same level of quality.

According to the website, Organic: Love to Know, “A good way to tell if veal is humanely raised is simply by looking at it. If it’s pink, that most likely means the calf had an adequate supply of iron.” They conclude that this pink veal is sometimes called Meadow, Rose, Pastured, Free-range, and Grass-Fed.  The New York Times adds that you should look for the label “certified humane. ”These “Certified Humane” calves are now given abundant space free from harsh weather and given good, dry bedding. Furthermore, calves are kept in small groups with others of similar size and age, allowing each to receive the full care from the veterinarian or the farmer.  The pinker the meat, the older the animal was at slaughter and, therefore,  the meat may be tougher and stronger-flavored. If the meat is a reddish tone but still marked as veal, it may be a calf between 6 and 12 months and should more appropriately be called baby beef. Or, the calf may have been allowed to eat grains or grasses, which also darken the meat.  The choice is yours.

Anything you can make with veal, you can make with chicken, turkey, fish or pork. I will describe below the different preparations for the type of meat or poultry that you choose to use. To prepare the cutlets, you will need is a meat mallet with a smooth side. The flouring process is quite important.  The flour helps brown the meat, but also lends more texture to any sauce produced at the end. Without flour, the addition of canned tomatoes or fresh tomatoes is likely to result in a watery sauce. In the wine deglazing process of a traditional scallopine dish, the collection of flavorful bits that accumulate in the middle of the pan while cooking the meat, is made easier when the meat is flour coated.

Scallopini Preparation

Chicken Scallopine.

To serve four, start with four 6-ounce boneless and skinless chicken-breast halves.  Cut each breast crosswise on the bias into two equal pieces. Place the pieces between two sheets of plastic wrap and pound them with the smooth side of a meat mallet to a thickness of about ¼ inch. Proceed with the recipe.

Pork Scallopine.

To serve four, start with eight 3-ounce slices of boneless pork tenderloin completely trimmed of fat. Place the slices between two sheets of plastic wrap and pound them several times with a meat mallet to a thickness of about ¼ inch. Proceed with the recipe.

Turkey Scallopine.

To serve four, start with eight 3-ounce turkey cutlets. (Most turkey cutlets are sold pre-cut in supermarket meat cases; if not, use boneless turkey breasts and cut then into slices and come as close as you can to these weights.) Place the slices between two sheets of plastic wrap and pound them with the smooth side of a meat mallet to a thickness of about 1/ 4 inch. Proceed with the recipe.

Fish Scallopini

Fish is not pounded, so buy thin fillets (4 small white fish fillets (such as tilapia, flounder or sole), about 1 pound total).  Salt & pepper the fish.  Put them into a shallow dish and cover with milk. (Soaking in milk helps to freshen the fish). Set aside.  Lift out of milk and proceed with the recipe.

Technique

Use a small skillet that fits 2-3 cutlets at one time.  This way very little fat will be needed.  It is better to repeat the process with a second batch of cutlets. Cutlets are removed to a dish to be kept warm and the sauce is made in the pan after the cutlets are removed.  The sauce is then poured over the cutlets on the serving platter.

For each batch of 3 cutlets:

Flouring

  • 1/4 cup flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper

Season the scallopine with salt and pepper. Dredge in flour to coat both sides lightly and tap off excess flour.

Cooking

Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in a small skillet.  Cook the cutlets until golden brown on the underside, about 3 minutes. Flip and cook until the second side is lightly browned, about 2 minutes. Remove to a platter and cover with foil. Repeat with remaining scallopine.

You will need the following ingredients for the sauce:

Number of Servings: 3

  • 1/2 cup fat-free, less-sodium chicken broth
  • 1/4 cup dry white wine
  • If you like the taste of Marsala, you can use that instead of white wine.  You may like red wine in the sauce for pork scallopini.
  • 2 teaspoons capers, rinsed and drained
  • 1 teaspoon butter
  • 1 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
If you like the taste of lemon, you can add 1 tablespoon of fresh lemon juice. The resulting dish is called Piccata.
Double the ingredients if you are making 6 cutlets.

Completing the Sauce                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   

Add all the sauce ingredients to the skillet, except the parsley.  Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer about 30 seconds.  Pour sauce over cutlet that are on the platter and sprinkle with parsley.  I like to serve scallopini with a green vegetable.



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