Healthy Mediterranean Cooking at Home

Category Archives: Bread

Shrimp Kabobs

Ingredients

1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley
2 chopped scallions
2 tablespoons feta cheese, mashed
1 teaspoon honey
¼ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon black pepper
1 tablespoon red-wine vinegar
3 tablespoons olive oil
10 large raw shrimp, peeled and deveined
1 bell pepper, cut into 8 pieces
Half a red onion, cut into quarters
½ of a 10-ounce package coleslaw mix (with carrots and red cabbage)
½  cup pita thins broken into small pieces

4 to 6-inch skewers

Directions

Preheat an outdoor grill broiler or stovetop grill to medium-high.

Combine the parsley, scallions, feta, honey sal, pepper, t.vinegar, and oil in a mixing bowl and blend. Set aside.

Thread 5 shrimp and 4pepper pieces on each of two skewers. Place the red onion quarters on another skewer. Brush them with some of the dressing.

Grill the kabobs until the shrimp turn pink and the peppers are lightly charred, about 3 minutes per side. Grill the onion wedges until slightly softened and charred, 2 to 3 minutes per side. Remove from the grill.

Combine the slaw mix and the pita chips with the dressing. Place on a serving pl; atter and serve the kabobs over the salad.

 

 

 


You can buy rolls if you choose but homemade really make these sandwiches. Serve the sandwiches with pickles and your favorite sandwich sides.

Italian Sub Rolls

6 rolls

Ingredients

Overnight Starter
3/4 cup (85g) Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
1/2 cup (113g) lukewarm water
1/8 teaspoon instant yeast

Dough
2 teaspoons instant yeast
2/3 cup (152g) lukewarm water
2 3/4 cups (326g) King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
1 1/4 teaspoons (8g) salt

Directions

To make the starter: Mix the starter ingredients in a small bowl, cover, and let rest at room temperature overnight.

To make the dough
Combine the starter and the remainder of the dough ingredients, and mix and knead by hand, or using a stand mixer, to make a smooth dough.

Place the dough in a lightly greased bowl. Cover it, and let it rise at room temperature until it’s very puffy, about 90 minutes, turning it over and gently deflating it after 45 minutes.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly oiled work surface. Divide it into six equal pieces.

Roll the pieces into cylinders, 4 1/2″ in length. Flatten the cylinders slightly; dough rises more in the center, so this will give a gently rounded top versus a high top.

Place the loaves on a lightly greased or parchment-lined baking sheet. Cover and let rise until almost doubled, about 45 minutes. While they’re rising, preheat the oven to 425°F.
Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, or until the internal temperature reaches 190°F.

Remove the rolls from the oven and transfer them to a rack to cool. Store, well-wrapped, at room temperature for several days.

Easy Philly Cheesesteak Sandwiches

2 servings

Ingredients

1/2 large onion, thinly sliced
1/2 red bell pepper, thinly sliced
1/2 yellow bell pepper, thinly sliced
1 garlic clove, grated
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 teaspoon dried Italian seasoning
Kosher salt
Freshly ground black pepper
10 oz shaved deli roast beef
Extra-virgin olive oil
2 sub rolls, split
4 thin slices of Provolone or American or Processed cheese, about 1 ounce each

Directions

In a mixing bowl combine the onion, peppers, garlic, oil, and Italian seasoning. Season with salt and pepper and toss to coat evenly.

Spread the vegetables on a stovetop grill pan or large skillet in a single layer. Grill over high heat until they start to brown and are tender, about 6 minutes, stirring occasionally. Transfer to a bowl.
Place the beef slices in a medium bowl, add just enough oil to coat them lightly, and season with salt and pepper; toss to coat.

Grill the steak slices on the grill pan over high heat, 1 minute, Turn the beef slices over with a wide spatula and cook for 1 minute

Warm the rolls.
Build the sandwiches with cheese on the bottom, meat, onions, and peppers. Serve warm.

 


America is a melting pot that was formed by the hard-working people who migrated here from lands as far east as China and Japan, as far north as Russia and Europe. They utilized American supplies and prepared them in ways that they had prepared them in their homeland. True American food is a collection of these culinary traditions passed down from generation to generation”.Each culture brought its cooking methods, food, and spices to America. They farmed the soil, hunted game, and incorporated their ways into the food of America.

The earliest known reference to French toast is found in the Apicius, a collection of recipes dating to the 1st century, where the dish is described as simply “aliter dulcia” (“another sweet dish”. The recipe says to “Break [slice] fine white bread, crust removed, into rather large pieces which soak in milk [and beaten eggs] fry in oil, cover with honey and serve”.The usual French name is pain perdu.It may also be called pain doré, “golden bread”.

An Austrian and Bavarian term is pafese or pofese, from zuppa pavese, referring to Pavia, Italy.The word “soup” in the dish’s name refers to bread soaked in a liquid, a sop. In Hungary, it is commonly called bundáskenyér (lit. “furry bread”)

French toast was served in railroad dining cars in the early and mid-20th century. Santa Fe was especially known for its French toast.

So, if the French did not invent this breakfast treat, who did? According to some, it was a man named Joseph French. He created the dish in 1724 and advertised it as “French Toast” because he forgot to add the apostrophe to his name.

Still, others say that there are recipes from the early 5th century AD and the dish we now know as French toast existed as early as the Roman Empire/ Romans would soak bread in a milk and egg mixture, then fry it in oil or butter.

Others believe that French toast was created by medieval European cooks who needed to use every bit of food they could find to feed their families. They knew day-old bread could be revived when moistened and heated. They added the eggs for additional moisture and protein.

The phrase “French Toast” first appeared in print in the Encyclopedia of American Food and Drink in 1871. But it is known by a variety of names including German toast, eggy bread, French-fried bread, gypsy toast, Poor Knights of Windsor, Spanish toast, nun’s toast, and pain perdu which means “lost bread” in French.

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America is a melting pot that was formed by the hard-working people who migrated here from lands as far east as China and Japan, as far north as Russia and Europe. They utilized American supplies and prepared them in ways that they had prepared them in their homeland.
True American food is a collection of these culinary traditions passed down from generation to generation”.Each culture brought its cooking methods, food, and spices to America. They farmed the soil, hunted game, and incorporated their ways into the food of America.

The Reuben sandwich is a grilled sandwich composed of corned beef, Swiss cheese, sauerkraut, and Russian dressing, grilled between slices of rye bread. It is associated with kosher-style delicatessens, but it is not kosher, because it combines meat and cheese. However, the Jewish delis are famous for serving this sandwich.

One story about the origin of this sandwich reports that Reuben Kulakofsky (his first name sometimes spelled Reubin; his last name sometimes shortened to Kay), a Jewish Lithuanian-born grocer residing in Omaha, Nebraska, asked for a sandwich made of corned beef and pastrami at his weekly poker game held in the Blackstone Hotel sometime around 1920.

The hotel’s owner, Charles Schimmel, and his son, who worked in the kitchen, made the sandwich for him, adding swiss cheese and thousand islands dressing, and put the whole thing on rye bread. The sandwich gained local fame when Schimmel put it on Blackstone’s lunch menu, and its fame spread when a former employee of the hotel won the national sandwich idea contest with the recipe. In Omaha, March 14 was proclaimed Reuben Sandwich Day.

Another account says that Reuben’s creator was Arnold Reuben, the German-Jewish owner of Reuben’s Delicatessen (1908–2001) in New York City. According to an interview with The New York Tines’ Craig Claiborne, Arnold Reuben created the “Reuben Special” around 1914.

Bernard Sobel in his 1953 book, Broadway Heartbeat: Memoirs of a Press Agent, states that the sandwich was a spur-of-the-moment creation for Marjorie Rambeau when the famed Broadway actress visited the Reuben’s Delicatessen one night when the cupboards were particularly bare.

Still, other versions give credit to Alfred Scheuing, a chef at Reuben’s Delicatessen, and say he created the sandwich for Reuben’s son, Arnold Jr., in the 1930s.

Corned Beef

Though it’s not known precisely where corned beef was invented, its ties to Ireland run deep. One of the earliest recorded references to the meat product was a Gaelic poem of the 12th century, and the country was the top producer of salt-cured beef for many years. It most likely came about when people began preserving meat through salt-curing. Evidence of its legacy is apparent in numerous cultures, including ancient Europe and the Middle East. The word corn derives from Old English and refers to the coarse, granular salts used to cure the beef

The industrial production of corned beef started in the British Industrial Revolution. Irish corned beef was used and traded extensively from the 17th century to the mid-19th century for British civilian consumption and as provisions for the British naval fleets and North American armies due to its nonperishable nature. The product was also traded to the French, who used it in their colonies in the Caribbean as sustenance for both the colonists and enslaved laborers.

The Original Reuben Sandwich

From Saveur Magazine

Ingredients

3 tbsp. sauerkraut, well drained
3 tbsp. Thousand Island dressing
2 slices dark rye bread
Unsalted butter softened
4 thin slices of Emmenthaler Swiss cheese
4 slices Jewish-style corned beef, or more to taste
Optional for serving: kosher dill pickle, potato chips, radishes

Instructions

In a small bowl, mix the sauerkraut with the Thousand Island dressing. Set aside.
Spread one side of each bread slice generously with softened butter. Place 1 slice on a clean work surface with the unbuttered side facing up. Top it with two slices of cheese, the corned beef, the sauerkraut, and then the remaining cheese. Top with the remaining bread slice, buttered side up.
Heat a small skillet, griddle, or grill pan to medium-high. Melt a thin layer of butter in the skillet, or brush the grill pan with melted butter. Once hot but not yet smoking, transfer the sandwich into the pan and cook, pressing down occasionally with a spatula and flipping as needed, until the bread is browned evenly on both sides and the cheese is fully melted, about 5 minutes per side.
Transfer to a plate, slice in half, and serve immediately. Garnish the plate with the pickle, potato chips, and radishes if desired.

My Version Of The Reuben Sandwich

2 Sandwiches

Ingredients

2 tablespoons deli mustard
2 slices of rye bread, lightly toasted
½ lb cooked corned beef, sliced thin, warmed in the microwave
4 oz sauerkraut. warmed in the microwave
4 slices Swiss cheese
1/4 cup Russian dressing
Dill Pickles

Directions

Preheat the oven’s broiler to low, and move the oven rack to the highest position.
Cover a small baking pan with aluminum foil.
Place the toasted bread on the pan and spread it with deli mustard.
Distribute the corned beef slices evenly on top of the bread.
Spread the dressing over the meat and then spread the sauerkraut over the dressing.
Top each sandwich with 2 slices of swiss cheese.
Place the sandwiches under the broiler until the cheese melts about 2-3 minutes.
Serve with dill pickles fries or onion rings.

 


Serve with Sausage and Peppers. Recipe follows.

Ciabatta Rolls

Starter
1 1/2 cups Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
1 cup room temperature water
1/16 teaspoon instant yeast
Or you can substitute 1 3/4 cups of sourdough starter
To make the biga: Mix all of the ingredients until well blended. Cover the bowl, and let rest at room temperature for 12 to 20 hours, until the mixture is very bubbly.

Dough
All of the starter (from above)
2 teaspoons instant yeast
3 cups Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
2 1/4 teaspoons salt
2 tablespoons Baker’s Special Dry Milk or nonfat dry milk powder
1 cup lukewarm water
3 tablespoons olive oil

To make the dough: Mix the biga with the remaining ingredients for 2 to 4 minutes, using an electric mixer set on slow speed. Increase the mixer speed to medium, and mix for about 4 minutes; the dough will be soft and slightly sticky.

Let the dough rise in a greased bowl, covered, for 1 to 2 hours, until very puffy.
Turn the dough out onto a well-floured surface, and shape it into a 6″ x 12″ rectangle. Using a bench knife, cut out eight 3″ square rolls. Space the rolls out evenly on the board. Let them rise for about 45 minutes, covered with a thin kitchen towel until they’re puffy.
Place a baking stone in the top third of the oven, and preheat the oven to 450°F. With a wide spatula place the rolls on the hot baking stone.
Bake the rolls for 15-18 minutes, until they’re golden brown. Remove them from the oven, and cool on a rack.
Yield: 8 rolls.

 

Sausage and Peppers

Ingredients

1 tablespoon olive oil
1 1/2 lbs hot Italian Sausage, sliced into 1/2-inch pieces
1 large onion, diced
2 bags of mini bell peppers, stems sliced off
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
2 cups finely chopped Italian tomatoes
1 teaspoon dried Italian seasoning
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

Heat the oil in a large skillet with a cover. Add the sausage and cook until lightly browned. Add the onion and peppers and stir fry for about 5 minutes. Cover the pan and let the mixture simmer for about 15 minutes. Add the tomatoes and seasoning and simmer the mixture covered for 15 minutes more.


America is a melting pot that was formed by the hard-working people who migrated here from lands as far east as China and Japan, as far north as Russia and Europe. They utilized American supplies and prepared them in ways that they had prepared them in their homeland. True American food is a collection of these culinary traditions passed down from generation to generation”.Each culture brought their cooking methods, food, and spices to America. They farmed the soil, hunted game, and incorporated their ways into the food of America.

If you once lived in the New York area you may remember some of the wonderful Eastern European foods you could purchase on the Lower Eastside. But if you live anywhere else in the country, or the world, it’s not likely that you’ would have had the pleasure of enjoying one of these chewy, baked onion-stuffed bialys.

The bialy is not a type of bagel;  it’s a thing unto itself. Round with a depressed middle filled with cooked onions and poppy seeds, it is simply baked (bagels are boiled, then baked). This means the outside is crispy and the inside is soft and tender, They can be eaten with cream cheese or straight-up shortly out of the oven.

The bialy was brought to the United States by Polish Jewish refugees in the late 1800s and became a staple of the Jewish bakeries in the Northeastern United States. Thousands of Jewish immigrants arrived from Poland and settled on the Lower East Side of New York City. Like most ethnic groups, they brought with them their local traditions and foods from their homeland. The Jews from Bialystok, Poland brought their local bread, called a “bialy” that they ate with every meal. The word “bialy” is actually a shortened version of “Bialystoker Kuchen” which in Yiddish means “little bread from Bialystok.”

Bialys became a popular bread and also breakfast for people in New York City, and the outlying areas; especially by American Jews. Bialys are considered an iconic food representative of New York City and can be difficult to find outside that area. However, bialys are sold frozen by a number of brands such as Ray’s New York, and others, in supermarkets across the country. Or you can make them at home.

 

New York Bialys

Dough
3 cups High-Gluten Flour
1 teaspoon instant yeast
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1 cup plus 2 tablespoons lukewarm water

Filling
1 medium-large onion, peeled and finely diced
1 tablespoon vegetable or olive oil
Heaping 1/8 teaspoon salt
Topping
Coarse salt and poppy seeds

Directions

Place the dough ingredients in a mixer bowl, and mix and knead for about 7 minutes, until a smooth, fairly stiff dough forms.
Place the dough in a lightly greased bowl, cover it, and allow it to rise for about 90 minutes until doubled in bulk.
While the dough is rising, make the filling. Fry the diced onion in the oil over high heat; it’ll brown very quickly, so stir often. Sprinkle with the salt, stir to combine, and remove the pan from the heat. Transfer to a small bowl to cool.

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Cover two baking sheets with parchment paper and sprinkle lightly with cornmeal.

On a floured board or counter, punch dough down and roll into a cylinder shape. With a sharp knife, cut the cylinder into 8 rounds. Gently pat each dough round into circles each about 4 inches in diameter. I placed English Muffin rings on the baking sheets and placed the dough in each so that they would hold their shape.

Place bialys on prepared baking sheets, cover with a kitchen towel and let rise 30 minutes or until increased by about half in bulk.

Make an indention in the center of each bialy with two fingers of each hand, pressing from the center outward, leaving a 1-inch rim. Place approximately 1 teaspoon of the onion mixture in the hole of each bialy. Dust lightly with flour, cover with a kitchen towel, and let rise 15 minutes.
Sprinkle with salt and poppy seeds. (Remove the muffin rings if used.)

Bake on upper and lower shelves of the oven for 10 minutes, then switch pans and reverse positions of pans and bake another 10 minutes until bialys are lightly browned. Remove from oven and let cool on wire racks. Serve with cream cheese, if desired.

 

 

 


Franks and Sauerkraut

2 servings

Ingredients

4

4 all-beef organic  frankfurters, cut into 1-inch pieces
2 tablespoons butter
1 cup chopped onion
1 clove garlic, minced
1 teaspoon paprika
1 teaspoon dried dill or 1 tablespoon fresh chopped dill
2 cups sauerkraut, drained

Directions

Heat a skillet with a cover on medium heat. Melt the butter, add the onion, garlic, and paprika, cook until the onion is soft, about 5 minutes.

Add the franks and sauerkraut, simmer, covered, 20 minutes.

Serve with rye bread or mashed potatoes.

My Homemade Rye Bread recipe.

Cucumbers in Sour Cream

Makes About 2 Cups

Ingredients

2 large cucumbers, peeled, halved lengthwise, seeded, sliced into 1/4″-thick half-moons
1 teaspoon kosher salt
3 tablespoons mayonnaise
3 tablespoons sour cream
3 tablespoons green onion (scallions), minced
2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
1 tablespoon honey or sugar
1 tablespoon chopped fresh dill or 1 teaspoon dried

Directions

Place cucumber slices in a colander; sprinkle with salt, tossing to coat. Let stand for 15 minutes, then pat dry with paper towels.

Combine mayonnaise, sour cream, onion, vinegar, honey, and dill in a mixing bowl. Add cucumber slices and toss to coat. Let salad stand for at least 5 minutes before serving, or chill for up to one day.


Sourbreads are delicious and are not difficult to make at home. Of course, if you live ina metropolitan area, buying good bread is not a problem. Where I live it is. You do need a stater and I bought mine from The King Arthur Baking company and follow their directions. Here is their guide: Sourdough Baking.

No-Knead Sourdough Bread

Ingredients

1 cup (227g) sourdough starter
1 3/4 cups (397g) lukewarm water
5 cups (602g) Unbleached Bread Flour
1 tablespoon (18g) salt

Directions

Stir together all of the ingredients (or use a stand mixer) to make a sticky dough. Continue to work the dough enough to incorporate all the flour, or beat for several minutes in a stand mixer.
Cover the bowl with plastic wrap, and let it rest at room temperature overnight, or for at least 8 hours; it’ll become bubbly and rise quite a bit, so be sure your bowl is large enough.
Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface. To make a single loaf, choose a 14″ to 15″ long lidded stoneware baker; a 9″ x 12″ oval deep casserole dish with cover; or a 9″ to 10″ round, 4″ deep lidded baking crock.

Shape the dough to fit, and place it in the lightly greased pan of your choice, smooth side up. Cover and let rise at room temperature for about 1 hour, until the dough has become puffy and fills the pan about 1/2 full.

Slash the loaf in 3 diagonal slashes just before placing it into the oven.

If baking in a lidded crock or pan, place it into a cold oven. Set the oven temperature to 450°F. Bake the bread for 45 to 50 minutes, then remove the lid and continue to bake for another 5 to 15 minutes, until the bread is deep brown, and an instant-read thermometer inserted into the center registers about 205°F.

To bake on a baking sheet, preheat the oven to 400°F, and bake for about 25 to 30 minutes until bread is a deep brown. Remove the bread from the oven, turn it out onto a rack, and cool before slicing.
Yield: 1 large loaf.

 

Sourdough Rye Bread

Makes 1 large (about 2-pound) loaf

1 cup sourdough starter
2 1/4 cups Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
1 3/4 cups rye flour
1/4 cup potato flour
1/4 cup nonfat dry milk
1 1/2 teaspoons Deli Rye Flavor
1 tablespoon vital wheat gluten
1 tablespoon caraway seeds
2 1/4 teaspoons salt
2 tablespoons honey
2 teaspoons instant yeast
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 1/4 cups lukewarm water

Directions
Combine all of the ingredients, stirring until the dough comes together.
Knead the dough until smooth, adding additional water or all-purpose flour if needed — the dough should be soft and somewhat sticky.
Cover the dough, and let it rise until puffy, 60 to 90 minutes.
Lightly grease a hearth bread pan (or other 2-pound capacity loaf pan); a 10″ x 5″ loaf pan; or a long covered baker or 13″ pain de mie pan, both without the cover, work well here. Use long hearth metal pan
Gently deflate the dough and shape it into a log the length of your chosen pan. Place it in the prepared pan, and let the dough rise until it’s just about doubled in size, 60 to 90 minutes. If you’re using a long baker, it will crown about 1/2″ over the lip of the pan. Towards the end of the rising time, preheat the oven to 350°F.
Bake the bread for 40 to 45 minutes, tenting it with aluminum foil after about 20 minutes to prevent it from getting too dark. The bread should be a nice golden brown when finished, and its internal temperature will register at least 200°F on a digital instant-read thermometer.
Remove the bread from the oven, turn it out of the pan, and allow it to cool completely before slicing.
Yield: 1 large (about 2-pound) loaf.


Hot Dog Cornbread Casserole

4 servings

Ingredients

Casserole
2 cups leftover Creamy Southern Succotash (recipe)
6 organic all-beef hot dogs cut into half-inch slices

Cornbread Topping
Vegetable cooking oil spray
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 cup yellow cornmeal
1 tablespoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 cup shredded cheddar cheese
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1 1/4 cups buttermilk
2 tablespoons sugar
1 egg
1/4 cup canola oil

Directions

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Spray an 8-inch baking pan with cooking oil.
Combine the succotash and hot dogs. Spread mixture in the prepared pan


For the topping
Stir together flour, cornmeal, baking powder, salt, and cheddar into a medium bowl.
In a smaller bowl, stir baking soda into buttermilk. Whisk in sugar, egg, and oil.
Pour wet ingredients into dry ingredients; combine quickly, using as few strokes as possible. Pour batter over the hot dog mixture and bake 30 minutes.

Steak Quesadillas

2 servings

Ingredients

Four 8-inch tortillas
2 cups Leftover steak, peppers, and onion from \the Steak burrito recipe
2 cups Mexican Four Cheese Blend
Jalapeno slices
Avocado oil
Salsa for serving

Directions

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit.


Prepare the quesadillas.
Lightly spray a large cookie sheetcovered with parchment  with cooking oil. Place 2 tortillas on the baking sheet. Spread ½ cup of the cheese over each tortilla and then divide the leftover beef and pepper mixture over the cheese. Top with jalapeno slices and sprinkle each with the remaining cheese. Place a tortilla on top of each quesadilla and brush with avocado oil.
Place the baking sheet in the oven for a couple of minutes and bake for a couple of minutes. Open up the oven and with a large spoon, press down on the quesadillas.
Pressing down on the tortillas will flatten them and help them stick to the cheese. Continue to bake until brown and crispy. Remove and slice into quarters Serve with salsa.


Scallopini

Ingredients

Two 6 oz boneless, skinless cutlets (turkey, chicken, veal, pork or fish), pounded until thin
Kosher salt
Ground pepper
1/4 cup all-purpose flour, preferably Wondra
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
2 tablespoons white wine, or dry vermouth
1 lemon, juiced (4 tablespoons),
1 tablespoon capers

Directions

Season the chicken on both sides with salt and pepper. Lightly coat in flour. Shake off excess.


Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the olive oil and butter, swirl them around the pan, and add the cutlets. Turn the heat to medium and saute for 2 minutes per side. Add the wine, lemon juice and capers, swirl them around in the pan and turn off the heat. Serve immediately with a small sprinkling of salt and pepper.

CreamyRoasted Tomato Pasta

Ingredients

5-6 large plum tomatoes quartered
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 large garlic clove sliced
Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
Half of a small onion, minced
1 medium or two small zucchini cut into sticks about the size of the pasta
3 fresh thyme sprigs or 1 teaspoon dried
1/2 cup heavy cream
2 cups short pasta
½ cup parmesan cheese, grated plus extra for serving

Directions

Heat the oven to 375 degrees F.


In a medium baking dish lined with foil, toss together the quartered tomatoes, olive oil, garlic, ½ teaspoon salt, and black pepper to taste. Roast for 40 minutes. Turn the oven temperature to 400 degrees F and roast the tomatoes for 2o minutes more. cool to room temperature. Remove the tomato skins and discard them.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil.

 

Melt the butter in a large saucepan over medium-low heat. Add the onion and zucchini sticks. Cook, stirring frequently until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the tomatoes and their juices. Add the thyme and the cream, stirring to combine. Bring to a simmer over low heat.

Cook the pasta in the boiling water until al dente. Drain, reserving 1/2 cup of the pasta water. Return the pasta to the pot and toss with the sauce. Add in ½ cup of parmesan cheese. Add pasta water if necessary to loosen up the sauce. Season to taste with black pepper. Serve with extra parmesan cheese.

Homemade Olive Bread

Ingredients

2 teaspoons instant yeast
4 cups all-purpose flour
1 ¾ cups warm water
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon honey
1/2 cup chopped green olives
1/2 cup chopped black olives
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt

Directions

Place all the bread ingredients in the bowl of an electric mixer. With the paddle attachment, mix until the ingredients come together around the paddle. Switch to the dough hook and knead the dough for 10 minutes.

Place the dough in a clean bowl greased with olive oil. Cover with a clean cloth and let it rise for an hour.
Preheat the oven to 400°F.

Punch the dough down and place on a parchment-lined baking pan. Shape the dough into an oval. Cover with a kitchen towel and let rise 30 minutes. Make three slashes in the top of the bread with a sharp knife. Place the pan in the center of the oven and bake the bread for 40 minutes.

Cool un a wire rack. Serve the bread with olive oil for dipping.



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