Healthy Mediterranean Cooking at Home

Category Archives: Beans

 

Lentil Vegetable Soup

Serves 6 to 8

Ingredients

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 large onion, chopped
1 large Yukon gold potato, peeled and diced
3 carrots, peeled and chopped
3 celery stalks, peeled and chopped
3 garlic cloves, minced (1 tablespoon)
1 tablespoon coarse salt
2 teaspoons Greek seasoning
1 1/2 cups lentils
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
4 cups chicken broth or vegetable broth
4 cups water, plus more if needed

Directions

Heat a large soup pot over high heat and swirl in the olive oil. Add the vegetables, garlic, and 1 teaspoon of salt. Reduce the heat to low and saute until the vegetables are lightly caramelized, about 5 minutes. Add broth, water, and seasoning. Bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low, add the lentils. Stir well and cover the pan. Cook for 20 to 30 minutes u til the lentils are soft and creamy. Serve hot in soup bowls.

Spinach and Roasted Red Pepper Quiche

Ingredients

1 prepared 9-inch pie crust
1 tablespoon olive oil
½ a large sweet onion, diced
1 red bell pepper, diced
1 cup cooked spinach
1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
3 large eggs
1 cup heavy creak
2 cups shredded gruyere cheese

Directions

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.
Heat the oil in a small skillet and saute the onion and pepper until tender and soft/ Stir in the thyme. Set aside to cool.
In a mixing bowl combine the spinach, eggs, and cream.
Spread the pastry on a 9-inch pie plate and crimp the edges.
Spread 1 cup of cheese in the bottom of the crust. Top with the onion and peppers. Pour the egg mixture over the vegetables. Sprinkle with the remaining cheese. Place the pie plate on a baking sheet and bake for 45 minutes.


 

Chicken Fajitas

For 2 servings

Ingredients
1 bone-in chicken breast
1 small red bell pepper, sliced
1 small sweet onion, sliced
1 teaspoon fajita seasoning
2 tablespoon avocado oil
4 – 6 inch tortillas
Shredded cheddar cheese
Sour cream

Directions

Poach the chicken breast in water to cover for about 20 minutes. Cool and slice.
Heat oil in a medium skillet and saute the peppers and onions. Add seasoning and sliced chicken, Cook on low until the chicken is hot.

 


Heat the oven to 350 degrees F and heat the tortillas until beginning to get crispy about 10 minutes.
Fill tortilla shells with the chicken mixture and add toppings.

 

Refried Black Beans

Ingredients

2 cups cooked or canned Black Beans
2 tablespoons avocado oil
¼ cup minced red onion
1 tablespoon line juice
1 tablespoon cumin
2 teaspoons mild chile powder

Directions

Mash the beans coarsely and set them aside.
Heat oil in a small skillet and saute the onion over low heat for 5 minutes. Add the beans and seasoning. Cooker low until creamy, about 20 minutes. Stir occasionally to keep the beans from sticking to the pan. Stir in lime juice.

 

Chunky Guacamole

Makes about 1cup

Ingredients
¼ cup chopped red onion
½ jalapeno pepper, minced
1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
½ an avocados pitted, peeled, and chopped
½ tomato chopped
1 teaspoon chopped fresh cilantro leaves
Salt to taste

Directions

Combine all the ingredients in a small serving bowl. Cover tightly with plastic wrap until serving.


Mahi Mahi

Ingredients

3 ¼-inch slices of red onion from a large onion, cut in half

8 (6ounces) mini sweet bell peppers, seeded and quartered

1 clove garlic, grated

1 teaspoon fajita seasoning or taco seasoning

2 Mahi Mahi fillets about 5 ounces each

¼ cup salsa

Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

Avocado oil

1 lime

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F

Heat one tablespoon of avocado oil in a medium skillet. Add the sliced onions and peppers.

Drizzle a teaspoon of oil in the bottom of a small baking dish.

place the mahi-mahi pieces on top and squeeze the juice of 1 lemon and drizzle with butter, top with sliced lemon, and sprinkle with the parsley and cilantro, cover and bake at 350 for about 30 mins or slightly firm to touch.

Black Bean And Corn Saute

Ingredients

1 1/2 tablespoons olive oil

1/21 a small onion, finely chopped

1 cup cooked with cooking liquid or canned black beans

1/2 teaspoon dried oregano

1/4 cup canned green chiles, cut into 1/4-inch dice

1 cup fresh corn kernels

Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

Directions

Heat the olive oil in a medium saucepan over medium-low heat. Add the garlic and onions, and cook, stirring occasionally, until translucent and very soft, about 10 minutes.

Drain the black beans, and reserve 1/4 cup of the liquid. Add the beans, the reserved bean liquid, and the remaining ingredients to the saucepan; cover, raise heat to medium, and cook, stirring occasionally, 10 to 12 minutes. Remove from heat, transfer to a serving dish. Serve immediately.


Try to buy authentic Mexican flour tortillas, for example, El Milagro. There is a big difference in flavor over supermarket brands.

Tacos with Chipotle Crema

Serves 4

ingredients

Chicken filling
1 medium red onion, chopped
1/2 bell pepper, cored, seeded, and chopped
2 teaspoons smoked sweet paprika
2 teaspoons chili powder
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 medium tomato, chopped shredded d
2 cups shredded cooked chicken
8 (6-inch) flour tortillas

Crema
2 tablespoons minced canned chipotle peppers in adobo
1/2 cup sour cream
1 tablespoon heavy cream
1 tablespoon lime juice
½ teaspoon salt

Topping
Shredded lettuce
Shredded cheddar cheese
Pickles jalapeno slices

Directions
In a sauté pan over medium heat, warm the oil and cook the onion, bell pepper, paprika, chili powder, oregano, cumin, and salt until the veggies are soft, 7 minutes. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, 1 minute. Stir in the tomato and
chicken, and cook until the filling is heated through, stirring about 3 minutes.

Warm the tortillas in moistened paper towels in the microwave for 30 seconds, or in a taco holder in a 350-degree oven until warm, about 2 minutes.

Stir the chipotle into the sour cream.

Pile the filling into the tortillas, topping with cheddar cheese, chipotle sour cream, and lettuce

Black Beans

Ingredients

Serves 4

1 lime, juiced
1 scallion, diced
1 garlic clove. Minced
2 tablespoons olive oil
Coarse salt and ground pepper
1 jalapeno chile, sliced
2 cups cooked {see recipe below} or canned {drained} lack beans

Directions

Heat the oil in a medium saucepan. Add all the ingredients, except the black beans. Saute over low heat until the onion is soft and the corn is cooked for about 5 minutes. Gently stir in the cooked beans and heat until hot, about 6 minutes.
Serve with the tacos.

Cooking the beans:
I use black soybeans because they are delicate and have fewer carbs than regular brands. However, they do take longer to cook than regular black beans.

Black Beans with Chiles
8 oz dried black beans or black soybeans
1 tablespoon oil
1 small red onion, cut in half
1 small carrot, cut in half
2 dried Mexican chilies, any type
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cups chicken broth
1/2 teaspoon salt
Freshly ground black pepper

Directions

Place oil, onion, and carrot in a Dutch oven. Cook until the onion is tender. Drain beans and add to the pan. Add whole chiles, cumin, and chicken broth.. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer, covered, 2houses. Uncover, add salt and pepper and simmer until beans are very tender, vegetables, and about 1 1 to2 more hours depending on the type of bean you are using. Drain the beans. Remove dried chilies.

Homemade Coleslaw

Ingredients

2 scallions, minced
16 oz package of coleslaw mix

Dressing
1 teaspoon honey or another sweetener
1/2 teaspoon each salt and pepper
1/4 teaspoon celery seed
2 tablespoons mayonnaise
2 tablespoons sour cream
2 tablespoons heavy cream
1 teaspoon white wine vinegar
1 teaspoon lemon juice

Directions

In a medium serving bowl with a cover, combine the dressing ingredients using a whisk.
Add the shredded cabbage and scallions and stir gently to mix.
Refrigerate for several hours before serving.


Salmon Saltimbocca

2 servings

Ingredients

Olive oil
2 salmon fillets about 6 oz each, skin removed
Salt & pepper to taste
2 slices prosciutto
4 sage leaves

Directions

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.
Pat the fish dry with paper towels and place in an oiled baking dish. Sprinkle the salmon with salt & pepper and drizzle with olive oil. Lay two sage leaves on the non-skin side of the fillets and place a slice of prosciutto on top of each fillet. Tuck the edges of the prosciutto underneath the sides of the salmon. Place the baking dish in the preheated oven and bake the salmon for 10 -12 minutes..

Greek Braised Chickpeas

This lemony chickpea dish can be served at room temperature or as an accompaniment to the main dish.

4 servings

Ingredients

1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/2 cup chopped onions
3 cups cooked chickpeas (two 15-ounce cans), drained
1 cup of water
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
Freshly squeezed juice from 1 lemon
1 tablespoon all-purpose unbleached flour

Directions

Heat the olive oil in a medium skillet over high heat and cook the onion until some pieces are turning brown, 4 to 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the drained chickpeas and water, season with salt and pepper, and cook for 5 minutes.

In a small bowl, whisk together the lemon juice and flour until well blended and smooth. Whisk several tablespoons of the hot liquid from the chickpeas into the lemon-flour mixture until well blended. Pour this mixture back into the chickpeas, reduce the heat to low, and simmer until the water is nearly evaporated and the sauce has thickened, 1 to 1-1/4 hours. Turn the heat off and let the chickpeas cool in the skillet. Serve at room temperature or warm.

Sautéed Swiss Chard

Ingredients

2 tablespoons olive oil
4 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
2 large bunches Swiss chard, ribs and stems removed, leaves torn into 2”
pieces (about 12 cups)
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

Directions

Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Cook garlic, stirring occasionally, until golden
brown, about 2 minutes. Add red pepper flakes and half of Swiss chard, season with salt and
pepper, and cook, tossing often, until wilted, about 4 minutes. Add lemon juice and remaining
chard and cook, tossing, just until all chard is wilted, about 1 minute; season with salt and pepper.r

 


America is a melting pot that was formed by the hard-working people who migrated here from lands as far east as China and Japan, as far north as Russia and Europe. They utilized American supplies and prepared them in ways that they had prepared them in their homeland.
True American food is a collection of these culinary traditions passed down from generation to generation”.Each culture brought its cooking methods, food, and spices to America. They farmed the soil, hunted game, and incorporated their ways into the food of America.

Hoppin’ John: A New Year’s Tradition

Forget champagne—in the Southern United States, Hoppin’ John is standard New Year’s fare. This simple dish of peas, pork, and rice has been a tradition since the 1800s. It’s believed to bring luck and peace in the coming year to anyone who eats it.
The first recipes for Hoppin’ John appear in cookbooks that date back to the 1840s, although the mixture of dried peas, rice, and pork was made by Southern slaves long before then. It seems to have originated in the Low Country of South Carolina, an area where plantation owners searched long and hard for a crop that would flourish in the hot, muggy weather. Rice grew well in the river deltas, so it was a natural choice, but the white farmers had no real experience with cultivating rice on a large scale until enslaved West Africans who had grown rice for generations arrived in America.

Although any type of dried peas can be used for Hoppin’ John, the black-eyed pea is the most traditional. This pea happens to have been domesticated in West Africa, which led to the belief that African slaves took the peas with them, planted them in their new surroundings, and created a dish that would remind them of their lost homes. This is probably only partly true. Newly abducted Africans were lucky to have clothes on their backs, and they certainly weren’t encouraged or even allowed to bring sacks of planting grain along with them. What is more likely is that slave traders saw black-eyed peas as an economical and easy way to feed their cargo.

The origins of the name “Hoppin’ John” are slightly less clear. Some say an old, hobbled man called Hoppin’ John became known for selling bowls of peas and rice on the streets of Charleston. Others say slave children hopped around the table in eager anticipation of the dish. Most food historians think the name derives from a French term for dried peas, “pois pigeons.”

It’s also uncertain why the dish became associated with New Year’s and good luck. The most likely story is that slaves would often have the period between Christmas and New Year’s off since no crops were growing at that time. Hoppin’ John was, and still is, often eaten with collard greens, which can resemble paper money and “golden” cornbread. The peas themselves represent coins. Some families boost the potential of their Hoppin’ John by placing a penny underneath the dishes—or adding extra pork, which is thought to bring more luck.

One tradition common in the United States is that each person at the meal should leave three peas on their plate to ensure that the New Year will be filled with luck, fortune, and romance. Another tradition holds that counting the number of peas in a serving predicts the amount of luck (or wealth) that the diner will have in the coming year.

This dish is traditionally a high point of New Year’s Day when a shiny dime is often buried among the black-eyed peas before serving.Whoever gets the coin in his or her portion is assured good luck throughout the year. For maximum good luck in the new year, the first thing that should be eaten on New Year’s Day is Hoppin’ John. If you eat leftover Hoppin’ John the day after New Year’s Day, then the name changes to Skippin’ Jenny since one is demonstrating their determination of frugality. Eating a bowl of Skippin’ Jenny is believed to even better your chances for a prosperous New Year!

Source: Beyond Black-Eyed Pease: New Year’s good-luck foods, by Mick Bann, Dec. 26,2008, Austin Chronicle.

Recipe for Hoppin’ John

Ingredients

1 tablespoon olive oil
1 small ham hock or bone
4 celery stalks, sliced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1 medium-size yellow onion, chopped (about 1 1/2 cups)
1 small green bell pepper, finely chopped (about 1 cup)
3 garlic cloves, chopped (about 1 Tablespoon)
1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 teaspoon kosher salt, divided
8 cups lower-sodium chicken or ham broth
4 cups fresh or frozen black-eyed peas

For the rice
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 1/2 cups uncooked Carolina Gold rice
½ teaspoon salt
Fresh scallions, sliced
Chopped parsley

Directions
Heat oil in a large pot. Add celery, onion, bell pepper, garlic, thyme, black pepper, cayenne, and 1 teaspoon salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, until onion is tender, about 8 minutes. Add broth and black-eyed peas and bring to a boil over medium-high. Reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer until peas are tender about 40 minutes. Drain pea mixture, reserving cooking liquid. Return pea mixture and 1 cup of the cooking liquid to the pot. Cover to keep warm; set aside.
To cook the rice
Heat oil in a medium saucepan over medium-high. Add rice and cook, stirring often, until fragrant and lightly toasted, 3 to 4 minutes. Stir in 3 cups of the reserved cooking liquid and 1⁄2 teaspoon salt. Bring to a boil, and reduce heat to medium-low; cover and cook until rice is tender, 15 to 18 minutes. Fluff rice with a fork, and gently stir into pea mixture in the Dutch oven. Stir in the remaining cooking liquid, 1⁄4 cup at a time, until desired consistency is reached. Sprinkle servings with parsley and sliced fresh scallions.

 


America is a melting pot that was formed by the hard-working people who migrated here from lands as far east as China and Japan and as far north as Russia and Europe. They utilized American supplies and prepared them in ways that they had prepared them in their homeland.
True American food is a collection of these culinary traditions passed down from generation to generation”.Each culture brought their cooking methods, food, and spices to America. They farmed the soil, hunted game, and incorporated their ways into the food of America.

Black-Eyed Peas

Cultivated since prehistoric times in China and India, black-eyed peas are related to the mung bean. The ancient Greeks and Romans preferred them to chickpeas. Black-eyed peas are believed to have been first domesticated near Africa’s Lake Chad in what is now northeastern Nigeria and northern Cameroon. They were brought to the West Indies by enslaved West Africans, as early as 1674.

Most black-eyed pea cultivation occurred in the Southern United States. The crop would eventually prove popular in Texas. Throughout the South, the black-eyed pea is still a widely used ingredient in soul food and southern cuisine. The planting of black-eyed peas was promoted by George Washington Carver because it provided exceptional nutrition. As a legume, it adds nitrogen to the soil and contains calcium (41 mg), folate (356 μg), protein (13.22 g), fiber (11.1 g) and vitamin A (26 IU), along with other nutrients per serving.

Black-eyed peas are in season in the South during July and August but they are popular dried for use in Hopping John, a New Year’s dish believed to bring luck for the year to come. Though black-eyed peas (also known as cowpeas) have no folkloric connection in West Africa to money (some people believe the peas symbolize coins), they have long been associated with good luck for several reasons. One belief was that the “black eyes” of the pea would protect one from the dreaded “evil eye”—a negative spell cast by one’s enemies. Others ate black-eyed peas on auspicious occasions. For example, on Good Friday, a cowpea-and-coconut-custard combination called frejon is a traditional meal in parts of West Africa. Additionally, a dish called ewa-Ibeji (which translates as “Beans for Twins”) was originally cooked with oil and only for ailing twin children, but now it is ceremonially prepared for healthy twins. In some traditional West African religions, black-eyed peas were prepared to worship a deity — if it was believed to be their favorite food — on ceremonial days.

My CSA share of black-eyed peas was generous this year and I decided to cook them in an untraditional way. They did make for delicious BBQ beans. Here is my recipe.

BBQ Black-Eyed Peas

Ingredients

2 slices bacon, diced
1 large sweet onion diced
1 medium jalapeno pepper, seeded and minced
1 large garlic clove, minced
1 ½ cups ketchup
1 cup of water
1/4 cup cider vinegar
¼ cup brown sugar
1 teaspoon dry yellow mustard powder
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1 teaspoon liquid smoke
½ teaspoon salt
4 cups fresh black-eyed peas, washed

Directions

Place the peas in a large saucepan, cover with water and bring to a boil for 2-3 minutes. Remove the pot from the heat and let stand for 60-90 minutes. Drain the peas in a colander.

In the same pot, brown the bacon, onion, jalapeno, and garlic. Add all the remaining ingredients except the black-eyed peas and bring the sauce to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and stir in the peas. Partially cover the pan and cook until the peas are very soft and the liquid thickens about 2-3 hours.


America is a melting pot that was formed by the hard-working people who migrated here from lands as far east as China and Japan, as far north as Russia and Europe. They utilized American supplies and prepared them in ways that they had prepared them in their homeland.
True American food is a collection of these culinary traditions passed down from generation to generation”.Each culture brought their cooking methods, food, and spices to America. They farmed the soil, hunted game, and incorporated their ways into the food of America.

Boston Baked Beans

Native Americans made cornbread and baked beans. The Pilgrims at Plymouth Colony learned these recipes in the early 1620s and likely added barley to the cornmeal to invent New England brown bread. The triangular trade of slaves in the 18th century helped to make Boston an exporter of rum, which is produced by the distillation of fermented molasses. At that time, molasses was added to local baked bean recipes, creating Boston Baked Beans. In colonial New England, baked beans were traditionally cooked on Saturdays and left in the brick ovens overnight. On Sundays, the beans were still hot, allowing people to indulge in a hot meal and still comply with Sabbath restrictions. Today, brown bread and baked beans along with frankfurters continue to be a popular staple throughout the region.

Ingredients

3 slices of bacon
1 lb navy beans or great northern beans, soaked overnight in cold water
1 large onion, finely diced
4 cloves garlic, grated
2 cups ketchup
2 tablespoons dry mustard
1 teaspoon freshly cracked pepper
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup dark molasses
2 bay leaves
1/4 cup real maple syrup
1/4 cup dijon mustard
4 cups of water

Directions

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees F.
In a Dutch Over, cook the bacon until crisp. Place the cooked bacon on a paper towel and leave the bacon fat in the pan.when cool enough to touch, crumble the bacon.
Add onions and garlic to the pot with the bacon fat and cook until the onion is soft.
Add the remaining ingredients and stir well. Add enough water to just cover the beans.

Sprinkle the bacon on top. Cover the pot and bake for 3 hours, Stir several times during the baking period. Reduce the oven temperature to 250 degrees F
Remove the cover and continue baking – to allow some of the liquid to evaporate leaving you with a thick sauce. Cook one hour and begin tasting the beans to see if they are tender – not mushy- and the sauce has thickened. Fresh dried beans cook more quickly than old beans. Continue to bake for another hour if needed. Add 1 teaspoon salt or to taste and stir well.
The beans are ready to be served or they can be refrigerated and reheated the next day.


Swiss Chard and Ham Quiche

Ingredients

Easy Oil Pastry
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour or whole wheat pastry flour(for low carb/gluten-free crust use 1 1/2 cups almond flour)
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon baking powder
1/3 cup olive or vegetable oil
4 tablespoons cold water
Quiche
1 tablespoon butter
1 bunch Swiss chard, chopped
1 small onion, chopped
2 cups leftover baked ham, chopped
4 large eggs
3/4 cup half-and-half
Kosher salt and black pepper
4 ounces Swiss cheese, grated (1 cup)

Directions

For the pastry:
Whisk together the flour, salt, and baking powder. This can be done right in the pie pan. Whisk together the oil and water, then pour over the dry ingredients. Stir with a fork until the dough is evenly moistened. Pat the dough across the bottom of the pie pan and up the sides. A flat-bottomed measuring cup can help you make the bottom even. Press the dough up the sides of the pan with your fingers, and flute the top. Refrigerate until ready to use.

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

For the quiche:
Rinse the Swiss chard and chop.
Melt the butter in a large skillet, add the onion and saute until just turning golden. Add the Swiss chard and continue to saute about 10 minutes, until the Swiss chard has wilted. Stir in the ham and season with pepper and salt.
Sprinkle half of the shredded cheese in the bottom of the pastry in the pie pan
Spread the chard mixture on top of the cheese.
Beat the eggs and mix with the half & half. Pour over the chard mixture in the pie pan. Sprinkle the top with the remaining cheese.
Bake about 45-50 minutes, until puffed and browned. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Ham and Bean Soup

Ingredients

1 lb pound dry great Northern beans, soaked overnight in cold water
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 carrots, peeled and chopped
2 ribs celery, chopped
1 onion, chopped
1 small-medium potato, peeled and chopped
2 large cloves garlic, finely chopped
A handful of parsley sprigs
Several sprigs of fresh thyme
1 ham bone and the meat surrounding it
2 bay leaves
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
8 cups of water
Leftover chopped ham, optional

Directions

Drain the beans and set aside.
In a large pot on high heat add in the olive oil and then add in the onions, carrots, and celery until soft, about 6 to 8 minutes.
Add the drained beans, the ham bone, and water. Stir, cover and simmer on low heat for 20 minutes.


Add in the potatoes, garlic, and herbs, stir, cover and simmer for 20 more minutes. Taste one of the beans to see if they are tender. If not cook for 5-10 minutes and adjust the seasonings. Add additional chopped ham if desired and heat for a few minutes.


 

Do inventory. This is the perfect time when you are stuck at home. You will be amazed at what you forgot is in the freezer. Maybe some chicken parts and a few steak bones for soup, or a package of stew meat. You get the picture. I found a ham bone from the holidays and a half package of split peas. (I keep my dried beans in the freezer as well as flour and nuts because I live in a hot climate)

Time to make soup.

 

Split-Pea and Ham Soup

This is my easy and uncomplicated version. It makes a delicious soup. Serve with some rye bread.

Ingredients

1 lb dried split peas
2 quarts cold water
1 meaty ham bone
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon dried marjoram or thyme
2 onions, chopped
3 stalks celery with tops, chopped
3 carrots, chopped
3 medium parsnips, peeled and diced
1 potato, peeled and diced

Directions

In a large stockpot, combine all the ingredients. Cover, bring to boil and then simmer for 2 hours, stirring occasionally.


Remove the bone to a plate and let cool. Cut off any meat still clinging to the bone. Dice the meat. Retrieve any pieces of meat that are floating in the soup and dice. Using an immersion blender, puree the soup. Return the diced meat to the stockpot and reheat the soup for serving.

 



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