fallmarket

Look for these fall fruits and vegetables at farmers’ markets and in produce departments for the best flavor (and greatest value) in season. Specific crops and harvest dates of fall produce will depend, of course, on your region’s climate.

Apples are one of those fruits people have forgotten have a season. But they do, and in the Northern Hemisphere they’re harvested late summer through fall.

Artichokes produce a second, smaller crop in the fall that tends to produce small to medium artichokes.

Arugula is a cool weather peppery green harvested at different times in different places (winter in warm climates, summer in cool ones) but grows in many places during autumn.

Beets are in season in temperate climates fall through spring. Fresh beets are often sold with their greens still attached.

Broccoli can be grown year-round but is more sweet, less bitter and sharp when harvested in the cooler temperatures of fall in most climates.

Broccoli rabe, rapini is a more bitter, a leafier vegetable than its cousin, broccoli, but likes similar cool growing conditions.

Brussels sprouts grow on a stalk and, if you see them for sale that way, snap them up – they’ll last quite a bit longer than once they’re cut.

Cabbage – the cooler the weather when it’s harvested, the sweeter it tends to taste.

Carrots are harvested year-round in temperate areas. Unusual varieties are harvested during the carrot’s natural season, which is late summer and fall.

Cauliflower may be grown, harvested and sold year-round, but it is by nature a cool weather crop and at its best in fall and winter.

Chard like all greens, turns bitter when it gets too hot. Chard is best harvested in late summer or early fall in colder areas, and fall through spring in warmer regions.

Fennel’s natural season is from fall through early spring.

Figs have a short second season in late fall (the first harvest comes in summer) just in time for Thanksgiving.

Grapes (early fall) ripen towards the end of summer and the harvest continues into fall.

Green beans tend to be sweetest and most tender during their natural season, from mid-summer into fall in most regions.

Kohlrabi (late fall) comes into season by the end of fall, but stays at its sweet best into winter.

Mushrooms, other than morels, are in-season in summer through fall.

Okra (early fall) needs heat to grow, so a nice long, hot summer in warmer climates brings out its best. Look for firm, plump pods in late summer and early fall.

Onions come from storage all year round but most onions are harvested in late summer through the fall.

Parsnips look like white carrots and have a great nutty flavor. Look for thinner parsnips, since fatter ones tend to have a thick, woody core you need to cut out.

Pears have a season that runs from mid-summer well into winter, depending on the variety and region.

Peppers (early fall) – both sweet and spicy- are harvested in late summer and early fall.

Persimmons are available for a short window in the fall and early winter – look for bright, heavy-feeling fruits.

Pomegranates only ripen in warmer climates. They are in season starting in October and are usually available fresh through December.

Pumpkins are the most common winter squash and come into season in September in most areas.

Quinces are an under-appreciated fruit. Bright and tart, quince jellies and desserts are a fall and early winter favorite.

Radicchio, like all chicories, is more sweet and less bitter when the weather is cool.

Sweet potatoes are often sold as “yams.” They are available from local sources year-round in warmer areas; from late summer through winter other places.

Turnips have a sharp but bright and sweet flavor. Look for turnips that feel heavy for their size.

Winter squash come into season in early fall and usually last well into winter.

Zucchini have a harvest season from summer into fall in most climates.

Cooking From The Fall Market

fallmarket2

Roasted Fennel Soup with Homemade Croutons

Ingredients

  • 1 fennel bulb (1 1/2 to 2 pounds)
  • 1 cup coarsely chopped white onion (1 large)
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 – 14 1/2 ounce cans reduced-sodium chicken broth
  • 1 russet potato, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch cubes
  • 1 cup half-and-half, light cream or evaporated milk
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground cumin
  • Ground white pepper
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 tablespoon fennel seeds
  • 1 recipe Homemade Croutons (optional), recipe below

Directions

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Cut off and discard fennel stalks, reserving some of the feathery tops. Remove any wilted outer layers from the bulb; cut a thin slice from the  base of bulb. Cut bulb into 1/2-inch slices, removing the core. Snip feathery tops; set aside.

In a 13x9x2-inch baking pan combine fennel slices and onion. Drizzle with oil; sprinkle with 1/2 teaspoon salt. Roast, uncovered, about 25 minutes or just until vegetables are tender.

Transfer roasted vegetables to a large saucepan. Stir in broth and potato. Bring to boiling; reduce heat. Simmer, covered, about 10 minutes or until potato is tender. Cool slightly.

Transfer vegetable mixture, one-third at a time, to a blender, food processor or use a hand immersion blender. Process until smooth. Return mixture to saucepan. Stir in half-and-half, lemon juice, and cumin. Cook over medium heat until heated through, stirring occasionally. Season to taste with white pepper and additional salt.

Meanwhile, in a small skillet cook fennel seeds over medium-high heat about 3 minutes or until light brown and fragrant, stirring frequently.

Top each serving with fennel tops, toasted fennel seeds and, if desired, Homemade Croutons.

To Make Ahead:

Prepare as directed and cool soup slightly. Transfer soup to an airtight container. Cover and chill for up to 2 days. Place fennel tops and toasted fennel seeds in separate resealable plastic bags. Chill fennel tops for up to 2 days and store fennel seeds at room temperature for up to 2 days. To serve, transfer soup to a large saucepan. Cook over medium heat until heated through, stirring occasionally. Serve as directed above.

Homemade Croutons

Ingredients

  • 2 cups of cubed Italian  bread
  • 2 tablespoons of olive oil
  • 1/4 teaspoon of freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/8 teaspoon of kosher salt

Directions

Spread cubed bread in a single layer in a shallow baking dish. Stir together olive oil, black pepper and kosher salt; pour over bread cubes, tossing to coat. Bake in a 350 degree F oven for 10 minutes. Stir; bake for 8 to 10 minutes more or until crisp and brown. Makes 2 cups.

fallmarket4

Beet and Apple Salad

Ingredients

  • 4 large beets (2 1/2 pounds)
  • 5 thyme sprigs
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1/4 cup apple-cider vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 3 tablespoons prepared horseradish
  • 1/3 cup salted pistachios, chopped
  • 1 green apple, thinly sliced

Directions

Preheat the oven to 375°F. In a baking dish, lightly drizzle the beets and thyme with olive oil. Season with salt and pepper. Cover with foil and roast until the beets are tender, about 1 hour and 45 minutes. Let cool, then peel the beets and cut them into thin slices.

In a large bowl, whisk the vinegar with the mustard. Whisk in the remaining 1/2 cup of oil until emulsified. Add the horseradish and season with salt and pepper; toss with the beets and pistachios. Transfer the beets to a platter, top with the apple and serve.

fallmarket5

Healthy Chicken and Mushroom Fricassee

Serve with the roasted carrots below.

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 10 oz white button mushrooms, rinsed and quartered
  • 1 cup leeks, split into quarters, then sliced into small squares and rinsed well
  • 1 cup potatoes, peeled and diced
  • 1 cup celery, rinsed and diced
  • 1 cup pearl onions, raw or frozen
  • 3 cup low-sodium chicken broth
  • 1 lb skinless chicken legs or thighs (4 whole legs, split, or 8 thighs)
  • 2 tablespoons each fresh herbs (such as parsley and chives), rinsed, dried and minced
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 2 tablespoons lowfat sour cream
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 º F.

Heat olive oil in a medium-sized heavy-bottomed roasting or braising pan (a large sauté pan with a metal handle).

Add mushrooms to the pan and cook until golden brown, about 3–5 minutes. Add leeks, potatoes, celery and pearl onions and continue to cook until the vegetables become soft, about 3–5 additional minutes. Add chicken broth to the pan and bring to a boil.

Add chicken to the pan, cover, and place in the oven for about 20 minutes or until the chicken is tender when pierced with a fork (or a meat thermometer reaches an internal temperature of 165 ºF).

When the chicken is cooked, remove them from the pan to serving bowl and keep warm. Return the pan to the stove top and bring the liquid to a boil. Stir in the lemon juice.

In a bowl, mix the cornstarch with the sour cream and add to the pan. Bring back to a boil, stir until mixed and then remove from the heat.

Season with salt and pepper and pour sauce over the chicken. Sprinkle with herbs and serve.

fallmarket1

Spice & Honey Roasted Carrots

Ingredients

  • 1 ½ pounds regular or rainbow carrots, scrubbed and peeled
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/2 cup coarsely chopped hazelnuts
  • 1 tablespoon coriander seed
  • 1 tablespoon sesame seed
  • 1 ½ teaspoons cumin seed
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • Lemon wedges

Directions

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.

Trim carrots and peel. Halve any large carrots lengthwise.

Line a shallow roasting pan with foil. Evenly spread carrots in the pan. Drizzle with olive oil. Roast carrots, uncovered, for 20 minutes.

Meanwhile, for the seasoning mix, heat a small skillet over medium-high heat. Add hazelnuts; cook and stir 3 minutes or until fragrant and toasted. Transfer to a small bowl.

Add coriander, sesame and cumin seed to the hot skillet. Cook on medium-high heat for 2 minutes or until fragrant and toasted. Remove spices from heat and transfer to another bowl; cool for 10 minutes.

Using a spice grinder, coffee grinder, or mortar and pestle, grind or crush toasted spices until coarsely ground. Add the hazelnuts and salt and pepper, crushing nuts slightly.

Remove carrots from the oven. Drizzle with honey; toss to evenly coat. Sprinkle carrots with the seasoning mixture. Return to the oven; roast 5 to 10 minutes more.

Serve carrots with lemon wedges. Makes 6 servings.

fallmarket3

Fig and Pear Cobbler with Cornmeal-Amaretti Biscuits

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup whole amaretti cookies
  • 1 ⅓ cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup cornmeal
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 ½ teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 cup butter, cut into small pieces
  • 1 ¼ cups whipping cream
  • 2 cups dried Mission figs, halved
  • 1 ½ pounds fresh pears, cored and sliced
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • Juice and finely shredded peel from 1 orange
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 1 ½ cups port wine or cranberry juice
  • 2 tablespoons whipping cream
  • 1/2 cup sliced almonds
  • Vanilla ice cream or frozen yogurt (optional)

Directions

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Place amaretti cookies in a food processor. Cover and process until finely ground. Add flour, cornmeal, the 2 tablespoons sugar, the baking powder and salt; cover and pulse with on/off turns to combine. Add butter; cover and pulse with on/off turns until pieces are the size of small peas.

In a large bowl combine butter mixture and the 1-1/4 cups whipping cream, stirring with a fork until the dough comes together. Transfer dough to a lightly floured surface; knead gently two or three times until it holds together. Press dough into a 12×8-inch rectangle, about 1/2-inch thick. Cut the dough into eight rectangles

In a 3-quart rectangular baking dish combine figs and pears. Place the 3/4 cup sugar in a small bowl; add the finely shredded orange peel and use your fingers to rub the peel into the sugar. Stir in cinnamon, coriander and kosher salt. Pour sugar mixture over the fig mixture; gently toss with your hands to combine.

In a small bowl combine 2 tablespoons of orange juice and the cornstarch, stirring until smooth. Stir in the port and the remaining orange juice; pour evenly over the fruit mixture in the baking dish.

Place dough rectangles on top of the fruit mixture; brush with the 2 tablespoons whipping cream and sprinkle with almonds.

Bake for 35 to 45 minutes or until the top is browned and juices are bubbly around the edges of the pan. If necessary to prevent over browning, cover loosely with foil for the last 10 to 20 minutes of baking. Remove foil, if using, and cool on a wire rack for at least 30 minutes before serving. Serve warm with vanilla ice cream or yogurt.

Advertisements