Healthy Italian Cooking at Home

Category Archives: tomatoes


The Province of Bari is in the Puglia region of Italy. It is attractive to tourists and has a large commercial harbor and airport and an excellent university. It is also the second most important economic center in Southern Italy after Naples.

Piazza del Ferrarese, Bari

Piazza del Ferrarese, Bari

The large, fertile plains of Bari stretch inland from the coast where olives, grapes and almonds are grown. Bari is among the largest and most populated province in Italy. Apart from the plains area around the city of Bari, the territory is mainly high hills, called “murge” that is partly occupied by the recently established National Park of Alta Murgia.


The old houses in this region are interesting, ranging from the ancient masserie (old fortified farmhouses) and the very popular, much photographed conical houses called trulli.

The area is famous for its olive oil. Italy is the second biggest producer, after Spain, and Puglia provides around 40 percent of the country’s extra virgin olive oil.

Durum wheat grows in abundance here and is used for making pasta and bread. The pasta from Puglia is made without eggs as they were once considered to be a luxury. The most famous pasta made in Puglia is ‘orecchiette’ (meaning little ears). The bread in Puglia, which accompanies all meals, is more diverse than many other regions in Italy and comes in a variety of shapes and sizes. It is cooked in a traditional wood burning.

Vegetables grow well in the warm climate and are used frequently in Bari’s cuisine. Tomatoes are used for making sauces to go with the local pasta and eggplant, peppers and squash are roasted and grilled as an accompaniment to meat.

The province is a good area to raise sheep and goats. They are bred for their meat, as well as their milk, which is used for a variety of cheeses. Lamb is the most popular meat, followed by pork.

Local cheeses include, Burrata which is made from mozzarella and cream, Cacioricotta – a seasonal ricotta cheese made from unpasteurized ewes’ milk and Canestrato – a hard cheese which is a mixture of sheep and goat’s milk.

Fish plays a large part in the cuisine because the long coastline offers a large array of fresh fish on a daily basis. Sea bass, red mullet, anchovies, mussels and cuttlefish are among the favorites.

The daily cuisine, as in the other southern regions of Italy, tends to be simple, fresh and unprocessed with most locals growing, rearing and making enough food for their individual needs.

Eggplant Rollatini



  • 1 large eggplant, peeled and cut into 8 lengthwise slices (You may also choose to leave the skin on)
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon each of finely chopped fresh oregano, thyme and basil ( or ¼ teaspoon each of dried herbs)
  • ¼ teaspoon each salt and black pepper
  • 1 cup ricotta cheese
  • 4 ounces mozzarella cheese
  • 1 1/2 cups Marinara (tomato) sauce


Combine the ricotta, mozzarella cheese, herbs, salt and pepper in a small bowl and refrigerate while you prepare the eggplant.


Heat a grill pan or the broiler. Brush eggplant slices with olive oil. Grill or broil eggplant slices three minutes on each side or until lightly brown.

Spread about 3 tablespoons of the filling on each eggplant slice.  Roll up tightly, jelly roll style. Place the eggplant rolls in an oiled baking dish and cover with the marinara sauce.

Bake in a 400-degree F oven for about 20 minutes.  Makes 8 appetizer or 4 main dish servings.

Focaccia Bari Style



  • 2 cups (500 grams) 00-type flour {substitute all-purpose if you don’t have the Italian flour}
  • 2 large baking potatoes, peeled and quartered, boiled until fork tender, drained and cooled.
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons instant yeast (1/2 oz.)
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt, plus more to taste
  • 1 cup (250 ml) lukewarm water
  • 10 cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 10 kalamata olives, halves
  • 1 tablespoon dried oregano
  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • Parmesan cheese


Place flour in a large mixing bowl and whisk in the yeast. Using a ricer, add the cooked potatoes.

Add the water and a small pinch of salt to the flour and begin kneading to obtain a sticky, firm ball.

You can also make the dough in an electric mixer or a food processor.

Place the dough in a bowl sprayed with olive oil. Cover the top of the bowl with plastic wrap and let the dough rise until double in a warm, dry place. About 1 hour — depending on the warmth of your kitchen it may take longer.

Preheat oven to 430 degrees F.

Use olive oil to generously grease a large baking pan (about 12 inches). Don’t use anything smaller or the dough will creep over the edge. Stretch the dough to evenly fill the pan.

Press the halved tomatoes into the dough, cut side down and do the same with the olives. Sprinkle with oregano and sea salt.

Drizzle the surface with more olive oil and bake for 20-30 minutes, or until the surface appears evenly browned and the tomatoes are caramelized.

Lightly dust with Parmesan cheese when the focaccia is finished baking. Let cool on a cooling rack before cutting.

Broccoli Rabe and Italian Sausage


Serves 4

  • 1 lb (500 grams) spicy Italian sausage links
  • 1 bunch broccoli rabe (sometimes called turnip greens in Italy)
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 3 oz.(100 ml) white wine
  • 1 hot pepper, chopped fine
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • Salt to taste
  • 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil


To prepare the broccoli rabe:

Wash the broccoli rabe well and cut off the bottom tough part of the stem. Cut the stalks into one inch pieces.

Blanch the broccoli rabe for 5 minutes in boiling salted water and drain well.

Place the garlic, oil, chopped chili and bay leaves in a large skillet with a cover; heat and saute for a few minutes.

Add the sausage links and cook until brown, about 5 minutes, add the white wine and allow it to evaporate. Add the blanched broccoli and season with salt and pepper, cover the pan and continue cooking over medium heat for about 30 minutes . Uncover and cook for 5 minutes to allow the liquids to evaporate. Remove the bay leaves and serve hot.

Cartellate (Honey Pinwheels)



  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 cup water
  • Vegetable oil for frying
  • 1 cup honey or fig syrup


In a large bowl of an electric mixer, combine the flour, oil, salt and cinnamon.

Slowly add the water and beat until the dough comes together.

Add additional water, if necessary, so the dough holds together.

Shape the dough into a ball.

Wrap in plastic and let rest at room temperature for 1 hour.

Divide the dough into 4 pieces. Dust each piece with flour.

Pass the dough through a pasta machine set at the widest opening.

Pass each piece through successive settings until thin.

On a manual pasta machine, stop at setting #6.

Place each pasta strip on a lightly floured surface.

With a fluted pastry cutter, cut the dough into strips 10 x 1-1/4 inches.

Fold each strip in half lengthwise but do not press it together.


With the wavy edges pointing up, roll the strips into loose spirals about 2 inches wide.

Pinch the edges to seal. Place on an oiled baking sheet.

Let the pinwheels dry at room temperature for 2 hours.

Heat oil in a deep fryer or Dutch Oven to 370 degrees F.

Carefully add a few pinwheels at a time to the oil.

Fry until evenly golden, about 1 minute.

Remove with a slotted spoon to a paper-towel lined plate.

Heat honey in a small saucepan until it thins.

Arrange the cartellate on a large platter. Drizzle with the warm honey.

Best served immediately or within a few hours.




The following are some of the favorite side dishes my family has come to enjoy on Thanksgiving. I don’t make all these dishes at one time but tend to rotate them each year to keep things interesting.

Italian Bread & Sausage Stuffing


Yields enough to fill a 12- to 14- pound turkey and a 9 x 13-inch baking dish.


  • 14 cups Italian bread, like ciabatta, cut into 1/2- to 3/4-inch cubes (about 3 loaves)
  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 2 lb sweet Italian fennel sausage (casings removed)
  • 2 large yellow onions, cut into 1/4-inch dice
  • 5 large ribs celery, cut into 1/4-inch dice
  • 8 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves (or 1-1/2 teaspoons dried)
  • 1 tablespoons dried sage
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 cup chicken broth, plus extra for the baking dish


Pile the bread cubes into a very large bowl and set aside. Place a large sauté pan over medium heat and add the olive oil and sausage. Cook, breaking up the sausage with a wooden spoon or spatula into 1-inch pieces, until light brown, about 5 minutes With a slotted spoon, transfer the sausage to the bowl with the cubed bread.

In the fat left in the pan, sauté the onions, celery and garlic until the onions are translucent and just beginning to brown, 8 to 10 minutes Stir in the thyme, sage, salt and pepper, cook 1 minute and then add the mixture to the cubed bread. Add the broth to the bread mixture; stir until well combined.

Put some of the stuffing in the turkey just before roasting. Pack the stuffing loosely, leaving enough room to fit your whole extended hand into the bird’s cavity. Cook the stuffing in the turkey in a 325 degree F oven to 165ºF, checking with an instant-read thermometer.

Place the remaining stuffing in a casserole dish or large baking pan, pour a cup or two of extra stock over the stuffing to replace the juices the stuffing would have absorbed from the turkey. Bake it covered until heated through, 45 minutes to 1 hour. For a crunchy top, uncover it for the last 15 minutes of baking.

Polenta-Stuffed Squash


Makes 6 servings


  • 3 acorn squash, each about one pound
  • 4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 3 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 2 cups finely chopped onions
  • 1/4 cup fresh sage, minced, plus more for garnish
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh thyme
  • 3/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground pepper
  • 1 cup fine to medium ground polenta or cornmeal
  • 3 cups low-sodium chicken or vegetable broth
  • 6 ounces Italian fontina cheese, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
  • 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese


Preheat oven to 400°F.

Using a sharp knife cut the squash in half; discard the seeds. Place squash cut side up in two 13-in. x 9-in. baking dishes coated with cooking spray. Rub the flesh and skin of each squash with 1 tablespoon oil. Scatter garlic inside.

Roast the squash in a baking pan until the flesh is tender but the sides are not yet collapsing, about 25 – 30 minutes.

Heat butter and the remaining 2 tablespoons oil in a large saucepan over medium-high heat. Add onions, the sage and thyme; cook, stirring often, until the onions are just starting to brown, 5 to 7 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Add polenta or cornmeal, then whisk in broth. Bring to a gentle boil. Reduce heat, cover and simmer, whisking frequently, until the polenta is tender, 10 to 15 minutes.

When cool enough to handle, scrape about 1 cup of flesh out of each squash, leaving a layer in the shell so it retains its shape. Mash the flesh into a coarse puree and add to the polenta along with the Fontina cheese; stir well. Spoon into the squash shells. Sprinkle the top of each with the Parmesan cheese.

Bake the stuffed squash until the cheese is melted and the polenta is steaming hot, about 20 minutes. Serve garnished with additional sage, if desired.

Spinach-Stuffed Tomatoes


6 servings


  • 6 medium tomatoes
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 1 package (10 ounces) frozen chopped spinach, thawed and squeezed dry
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1/2 cup dry bread crumbs
  • 1 teaspoon Italian seasoning
  • 1/2 cup shredded mozzarella cheese
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper


Cut a thin slice off the top of each tomato. Scoop out the pulp, leaving a 1/2-inch thick shell. Invert tomatoes onto paper towels to drain.

Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in a skillet. Add spinach and garlic; cook until tender, about 3-4 minutes.

In a bowl, combine bread crumbs and Italian seasoning. Add the spinach and cheese to the crumb mixture. Sprinkle tomato shells with salt and pepper and stuff with the spinach mixture. Place in a greased 13-inch x 9-inch baking dish. Bake, uncovered, at 375° F for 20-25 minutes.

Italian Baked Macaroni and Cheese


8 servings


  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 pound small shell macaroni
  • 1 cup half and half
  • 2 cups shredded Italian Fontina cheese
  • Salt
  • Pinch of freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1/3 cup plain bread crumbs
  • 1/4 cup freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese


Bring 4 quarts water to a boil in a large pot for cooking the pasta. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Coat a 13×9 baking dish with cooking spray; set aside.

Dice the butter and place in a large bowl. Warm the half & half in the microwave, about 1 minute. Cover to keep warm. Shred the Fontina cheese and add to the bowl with the butter. Set aside.

When the water comes to a boil, add salt and the shells and cook until they are 1 to 2 minutes shy of al dente. Drain.

Add the warm half & half to the Fontina and butter. Stir until the cheese starts to melt. Season with salt to taste and the nutmeg.

Stir the shells into the bowl with the cheese. Toss to coat well. Pour the mixture into the baking dish.

Combine the bread crumbs and Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese; sprinkle over the pasta.

Bake until the sauce is bubbling and the topping turns golden brown, about 20 minutes. Serve immediately.

Glazed Cipollini Onions



Cipollini means little onion in Italian.

Serves 4


  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 16 cipollini onions, trimmed and peeled
  • Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons honey
  • 3/4 cup low-sodium chicken broth
  • 3 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed


Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

Heat olive oil in a medium ovenproof skillet over medium heat. Add onions, stem side down, and cook, until lightly browned, 2 to 3 minutes. Turn and continue browning on opposite side, about 2 minutes more. Season with salt and pepper.

Add vinegar and honey; cook, until slightly syrupy, about 2 minutes. Add chicken broth, thyme, and garlic; bring to a boil. Transfer skillet to oven and roast until onions are easily pierced with the tip of a sharp knife, 15 to 20 minutes.

Olive Oil and Spinach Mashed Potatoes



  • 2 lbs Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-inch chunks
  • 1 package frozen spinach, defrosted
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 2 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed
  • 1 rosemary sprig, leaves removed and chopped
  • 1 thyme sprig, leaves removed and chopped
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil


In a large saucepan, cover potatoes with cold water by 2 inches and add 1 tablespoon coarse salt and the garlic cloves. Bring to a boil; cook until the potatoes are very tender and easily pierced with a fork, 20 to 25 minutes. Reserve 1/2 cup potato cooking water. Drain; transfer to a large bowl.

Heat together the milk, spinach, chopped rosemary leaves and chopped thyme leaves then remove from the heat, cover and set aside to infuse flavors.

Using a potato masher, mash the potatoes with the olive oil and some of the reserved cooking water as needed to moisten. Add the milk and spinach mixture.  Stir until well combined and season with salt and pepper.


The province of Caserta is in the Campania region of Italy located 40 kilometres (25 miles) north of Naples. It is an important agricultural, commercial and industrial area. The Roccamonfina Regional Park is the location of an extinct volcano whose eruptions shaped this region long ago. It is an ideal habitat for the chestnut forests, vineyards and olive groves that are found in the area.


Festivals and fairs that marry both the sacred and the pagan recall the history, culture and traditions of Caserta Province – in particular, the Sagra delle Pallottole, a food festival held every year in San Leucio. The event features a historic procession in which participants wear traditional clothing and the local women prepare and serve potato croquettes. Exhibits, events, concerts and the famous float parade all enliven the streets in celebration of one of the most colorful times of the year, Carnevale.


The cuisine of Caserta is made of simple recipes using local products.


Buffalo mozzarella is produced with craftsmanship in this province. It is often made into different shapes: round, braided, knotted or small balls. The water buffalo milk is also used to make butter and other cheeses such as, burrino, burrata, smoked provola and fresh or dried ricotta. Salaprese is a sheep’s milk cheese that is not matured but eaten right after having absorbed the salt. It tastes fresh and sweet, with a strong hint of sheep’s milk.


Local farms supply meat used to prepare cold cuts such as capicollo, prosciutto di Monte, pancetta tesa and the filet, Vairano Patenora. The province is also famous for its salsiccia, a sausage seasoned in special terra-cotta vases.

The Campanella artichoke, porcini mushroom, the many varieties of apple, the golden plum and the chestnut are all delicacies that distinguish the local cuisine.

Desserts consist of honey and walnut biscuits; pigne are glazed sweets and a pastry called serpentone that is stuffed with honey and walnuts.

The wine list is long as well and includes Asprinio di Aversa, Falerno del Massico and Galluccio, all labeled DOC.

Culinary Specialties of Caserta


Mozzarella di Bufala Salad



  • Buffalo mozzarella (1 large ball for every 2 servings)
  • Breadcrumbs
  • All purpose flour
  • Salt & pepper
  • 2 eggs
  • Olive oil for frying
  • Mixed salad greens


  • 1 large red bell pepper
  • 1/3 cup mascarpone cheese
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 1 small chili pepper
  • Handful of basil leaves, plus extra for garnish


Make the sauce first.

Grill the red pepper, turning it often until it starts to char evenly on all sides. When cool enough to handle, peel away the skin, cut open the pepper and clean out the seeds and any pulp. Cut the flesh into smaller pieces and place in a food processor along with the oil, chili pepper, garlic, basil, salt and mascarpone. Process until smooth. Taste and correct for salt. Place in the refrigerator to thicken while you prepare the other ingredients. Remove the sauce about 5 minutes before serving and give it a good stir.

Tip: You can make the sauce in advance to save time. It will keep for a few days. If you want a thicker sauce, leave out the olive oil.

Prep the mozzarella.  

Set out a plate for flour and another for the breadcrumbs. Beat the eggs in a shallow bowl. Drain the mozzarella and slice each ball in half. Gently pat both sides of the slices dry with a paper towel. Dredge each piece of cheese in the flour, then the egg and then the breadcrumbs, making sure to cover the cheese entirely; set aside on waxed paper. Repeat until all the cheese is breaded. Depending on how many cheeses you are using, you may need more breading ingredients.

You can serve all the cheese on one platter with the salad or as individually plated servings. Arrange the salad greens accordingly.

Heat the olive oil. You want at least an inch of cooking oil, so use a small pan and fry the cheese in batches. Gently slide the slices into the oil. They are ready to turn over after about 3 minutes, or when the bottom has turned golden brown and firm. Gently turn them and cook for another 3 minutes. When golden and crunchy on all sides, transfer the cheese to paper towels to drain and lightly salt them.

Let them cool slightly, but be sure to serve them warm-hot. You can also slice them in half. Drizzle the pepper cream sauce directly over the cheese and garnish with fresh basil leaves.

Linguine with Colatura di Alici and Erbe di Campo



  • 1 lb (500 gr) linguine
  • 1 ½ lbs (700 gr) wild greens or broccoli rabe
  • 3-4 cloves of garlic
  • 1 tablespoon colatura di alici (Italian anchovy sauce)
  • 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • Salt to taste
  • 1 teaspoon chili flakes


Wash and clean the broccoli rabe and cut them into 2-inch pieces; set aside.

In a large pan, sauté the garlic in the olive oil until lightly golden, add the broccoli and season with salt. Cook over medium heat until the broccoli is tender, then remove the pan from the heat.

Place a pot of salted water on the stove and bring to a boil. Add the pasta and cook until al dente. Reserve 1 cup of the pasta cooking water.

Once the pasta is cooked, drain it and add it to the pan with the broccoli. Toss the mixture over low heat, add the colatura and chili; toss again to coat the pasta evenly.

Add a couple of ladles of pasta cooking water to create a creamier sauce. Serve hot.

Salt Cod Baked in Spicy Tomato Sauce



  • 2 pounds (900 g) thick salt cod fillets
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon hot red pepper flakes (chili)
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
  • 2 cans (each 12 ounces; 340 g) Italian plum tomatoes, pureed
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 teaspoons dried oregano
  • Vegetable oil for frying
  • All-purpose flour for dredging
  • Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper


Salt cod must be soaked overnight before cooking to remove the salt. Place it in a bowl with cold water to cover and soak for 24 hours, changing the water three or four times.

If you’re in a hurry, try the quick-soak method. Rinse the cod under cold running water for 15 minutes. Place it in a pan with cold water to cover and gradually bring to a boil. Drain the fish and rinse in cold water. Repeat the boiling and rinsing process two or three times.

Cut the cod into 4 x 1 1/2-inch (10 X 4-cm) pieces, then pat dry with paper towels and set aside.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F (180 C).

Sauté the garlic in the olive oil until golden. Remove the skillet from the heat and add the hot pepper flakes and parsley. Stir, then replace the skillet on the stove. Add the tomatoes, sugar, salt, pepper and oregano. Simmer 5 minutes and set aside. Remove and discard the garlic.

Heat the vegetable oil in another skillet over moderate heat. When a cube of bread browns in about 1 minute, the oil is ready for frying. Flour the cod fillets lightly and fry until golden on both sides. Drain on paper towels.

Arrange the cod fillets in a bake-and-serve dish and cover with the tomato sauce. Bake for 20 minutes.

Limoncello Sorbet Cups



  • 2 cups water
  • 1 ¼ cups sugar
  • 1/2 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1/2 cup limoncello
  • Lemon zest from two lemons
  • 1 pinch salt
  • Lemon cups (1 hollowed out lemon  per serving)


Bring the water and sugar just to a boil in a sauce pan, stirring frequently, until you have a thick, clear syrup. Turn off the heat and let cool.

Transfer the syrup to a bowl and add the lemon juice, lemon zest, limoncello and salt. Stir well and transfer to a ceramic baking dish or plastic container, cover and freeze for at least 3 hours.

Check the sorbet periodically and move it around with a fork. When ready, scrape the sorbet with a fork; then use an ice cream scoop to serve.

To make the lemon cups:

Slice ¾ of an inch off the stem side of the lemons. Using a paring knife and teaspoon, carefully cut and scoop out the lemon pulp. Do this over a bowl so you can save the juice. Slice about ¼ inch from the bottom of the lemons, so they will stand.

Freeze the cups along with the sorbet. When the sorbet is ready, fill the cups and place them back in the freezer until serving. You can make a batch of several sorbet cups in advance.



The best way to get the freshest fish available is to simply ask. Ask your local market what’s fresh today? This will sometimes require being flexible about the kind of fish you cook. Fresh fish always tastes better. The freshest fish will smell of the sea (briny) but not fishy; the gills should be bright and moist; the meat firm and springy; and the scales should not be dull or flake off easily.

Fish come in three basic varieties:

  • White fish — cod, grouper, sole and haddock, etc. These fish have translucent skin that turns an opalescent white when cooked. This type of fish is good for sauteing and baking.
  • Meaty fish — salmon, trout, tuna and sardines, among others. Meaty fish are oilier and thicker than other varieties and contain good oils (omega 3 fatty acids). They are often grilled.
  • Shellfish — lobster, shrimp, scallops, mussels, clams, mussels and oysters. Shellfish can be cooked almost any way and served hot or cold.

Resist the temptation to cook fish until it flakes. Fish is done when the color turns from translucent to opaque (white) or has reached 140°F on an instant read thermometer, otherwise, you run the risk of overcooking it.

If you buy fresh seafood, use it the same day or freeze it immediately. If frozen, thaw in the refrigerator overnight, never on the kitchen counter. Rinse fish in cold water, drain and pat dry with paper towels.

Almond-Crusted Fish


Serves: 4


  • 2 tablespoons minced red onion
  • 1/4 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/4 cup coarsely chopped green pimento-stuffed olives
  • 1/4 cup chopped 
fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 1 tablespoon chopped 
drained capers
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons plus 4 tsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • Four 5-oz skinless white fish fillets (cod, grouper, catfish, sea bass, halibut, grouper, haddock, snapper, etc.)  about ¾ inch thick
  • 1 large egg white, 
lightly beaten
  • 1/4 cup sliced unsalted almonds


In a medium bowl, combine the minced onion, olives, parsley, capers, vinegar and the 2 tablespoons olive oil; set aside.

Brush the top (skinless side) of the fish with egg white. Press almonds evenly over the top of the fish.

In a very large skillet on medium, heat the remaining 4 teaspoons of oil. Add the fish, crusted side down and cook until the almonds are toasted, 
2 to 3 minutes. Carefully turn the fish with a wide spatula and continue cooking until the fish is cooked through, 
3 to 4 minutes.

Remove the fish to a serving platter and spoon the olive mixture on top.

Parchment-Baked Fish


Serves: 1


  • One 6-oz fish fillet
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1 medium clove garlic, minced
  • Ground black pepper, to taste
  • 3 sun-dried tomatoes, chopped
  • 2 thin slices red onion
  • 1/2 small fennel bulb, cored and thinly sliced
  • 4 Kalamata, pitted and thinly sliced
  • 1/4 teaspoon red pepper (chili) flakes, or to taste
  • 2 large sprigs rosemary


Preheat the oven to 400°F.

Tear off 1 piece of parchment to form a square large enough to enclose the fish. Place the parchment on a baking dish and place the fish in the center of the square. Drizzle with oil, then rub in the garlic and season with black pepper. Sprinkle sun-dried tomatoes over the top.

Arrange onion slices over the fish and top with the fennel and olives. Sprinkle with red pepper flakes and lay rosemary sprigs on either side of the fish, tucking them firmly against the fish.

Grasp the top and bottom edges of the paper parallel to the work surface and bring them together up over the fish, pinching together at the top. Fold over by about 1 inch, then continue folding down, leaving about 1/2 inch of space above the fish to allow for steam. Fold each side toward center until about 1/4 inch from fish.

Place the baking dish in the oven and cook for 12 to 15 minutes, depending on the  thickness of the fish. Remove the baking dish from the oven and place the pouch on a serving dish or plate. Carefully unfold parchment to allow steam to escape and serve immediately.

Fish Florentine


Serves 2


  • Two 5-oz fish fillets
  • 5 grape tomatoes, sliced
  • 1 clove garlic, thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh Italian-leaf parsley
  • Juice of 1/2 lemon
  • 2 large shallots, finely diced
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 8 oz. baby spinach
  • 1/4 cup feta cheese


Preheat the oven to 350°F.

Place the fish and the tomatoes in a glass baking dish. Sprinkle garlic and parsley over the top and squeeze the lemon juice over the fish. Cover with foil and bake for 15 to 20 minutes, until the fish is opaque and registers 140°F on an instant read thermometer.

In a medium skillet over medium-high heat, sauté shallots in oil for 1 minute. Reduce the heat to medium and add the spinach, cooking until wilted, about 5 minutes. Stir in the feta cheese and heat until melted and evenly distributed.

To serve, place 3/4 cup of the spinach-feta mixture on each plate and place 1 fillet and half the tomatoes on top of each serving.

Poached Fish In Tomato Sauce


4 servings


  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic thinly sliced
  • 1 teaspoon Aleppo pepper or ½ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes (chili)
  • One 14.5-oz. can whole peeled tomatoes, drained
  • 1/4 cup dry white wine
  • 2 bay leaves
  • Pinch of saffron threads
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Four 5-oz. skinless cod, bass, flounder, etc. fish fillets


Heat oil in a medium skillet over medium heat. Add garlic and Aleppo pepper and cook, stirring often (garlic should not brown), about 2 minutes.

Add tomatoes, crushing with your hands as you add them, wine, bay leaves, saffron and ½ cup water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer, 5 minutes; season to taste with salt and pepper.

Reduce heat to medium-low; season fish with salt and pepper and place in the skillet with the poaching liquid. Cover and cook at a bare simmer until fish is opaque throughout, about 5–7 minutes and the fish registers 140°F on an instant read thermometer. (Thicker pieces will take longer to cook).

Gently transfer fish to individual shallow bowls and spoon poaching liquid over.

Fish Baked in Phyllo Pastry


This recipe makes a great entree for company.

Serves 6


  • Six 5 ounce fish fillets
  • 4 ounces reduced fat cream cheese, softened
  • 4 ounces crab meat
  • 1/4 cup onion, finely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh flat leaf parsley
  • Salt and pepper
  • 12 sheets phyllo pastry
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 8 tablespoons butter, melted
  • Hot sauce to taste


In a mixing bowl gently combine the crab, cream cheese, onion, parsley, salt, pepper and a few shakes of hot sauce.

Divide the stuffing evenly on top of each fillet and pat it flat with a spatula.

Heat the olive oil in a skillet and brown the fish fillets on the side without the stuffing.

Remove 2 sheets of phyllo pastry from the roll and cut them in half. Lightly brush each piece with melted butter and stack them together.

Place a fish fillet on top of the phyllo layer and fold the pastry over the fish so it is completely covered and the edges are sealed.

Repeat the process with the remaining 5 fish fillets and pastry. Place the fish packets on a platter and refrigerate until it is time to cook them.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F and bake 20-25 minutes until the pastry is puffed and golden.


Yes, pasta is healthy!

Pasta makes the perfect delivery system for the healthy foods you should have each day. Pair pasta with a variety of nutrient-dense foods and create meals that you can feel good about. Fiber-filled vegetables and beans, heart healthy fish and monounsaturated oils, antioxidant-rich tomato sauce and protein-packed cheeses, poultry and lean meats are all nutrient dense foods.

Carbohydrates like pasta provide glucose, the crucial fuel for your brain and muscles.  Pasta is an excellent source of complex carbohydrates, which provide a slow release of energy.  Unlike simple sugars that offer a quick boost of energy, pasta helps sustain energy.

Pasta is very low in sodium and enriched varieties provide a good source of several essential nutrients, including iron and several B-vitamins.  Whole wheat pasta can provide up to 25% of daily fiber requirements in a one cup portion. Enriched pasta is also fortified with folic acid – essential for women of child-bearing age.  FDA regulations require enriched grain products to contain this important vitamin.  A serving of dry pasta supplies the equivalent of roughly 100 micrograms of folic acid or 25% of the recommended daily intake.

Pasta meals are central to the Mediterranean Diet, not only because they are tasty, inexpensive and easy to prepare, but because they are the perfect way to highlight and complement many of the other healthy foods in this diet. The New England Journal of Medicine reported that the Mediterranean Diet reduces the risk of death from heart disease and cancer and it is one of the most recognizable successful diets.

So here is how to keep your pasta healthy:

Farfalle with Zucchini and Butternut Squash


This pasta dish makes a great meatless Monday dinner option.

6 servings


  • 1 lb farfalle (bow-ties) pasta
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 teaspoons fresh oregano, chopped
  • 1 butternut squash, diced into 1 inch pieces
  • 2 zucchinis, sliced into half moons
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • 1/3 cup grated Pecorino cheese


Bring a large pot of water to a boil and cook the pasta al dente according to the package directions. Reserve one cup of the pasta water.

Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic and oregano and sauté for 1-2 minutes.

Add the butternut squash and sauté for another 6-8 minutes, or until lightly browned and softened.

Add the zucchini and sauté for 1-2 minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Add 1 cup of the pasta cooking liquid to the vegetables and bring to a simmer.

Toss the drained pasta with the sauce and cheese.

Chicken Fettuccine in Parmesan Cream Sauce


4 servings


  • Non-stick olive oil spray
  • 10 ounces skinned and boned chicken breast, cut into 1-inch long strips
  • 2 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons butter
  • 4 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 2 cups reduced fat milk
  • 1 1/2 ounces Parmesan cheese, grated
  • 1/4 teaspoon each salt, white pepper and ground nutmeg
  • 8 oz. dried fettuccine
  • 2 cups broccoli florets, blanched or frozen florets, defrosted and drained on paper towels


Cook pasta al dente according to package directions. Drain.

Spray a 10-inch nonstick skillet with nonstick olive oil spray, add the 2 teaspoons of butter and heat over medium-high heat for 1 minute; add chicken and cook, stirring occasionally, until cooked through, about 3 minutes. Remove chicken from the skillet; set aside and keep warm.

In the same skillet melt remaining butter over medium-high heat; add garlic and cook, stirring frequently, until softened, about 1 minute. Sprinkle butter with flour and cook, stirring constantly with wire whisk, for 1 minute. Continuing to stir, slowly add the milk; cook until bubbly and thickened, about 3 minutes.

Add cheese, salt, pepper and nutmeg to the milk mixture; stir until the cheese is melted. Add cooked fettuccine, broccoli and reserved chicken; reduce heat to low and toss until all ingredients are evenly coated with the sauce and heated through.

Pasta with Eggplant Olive Sauce


6 servings


  • 1 medium eggplant
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • One 28 – ounce can Italian-style tomatoes, cut up, undrained
  • One 6 – ounce can Italian-style tomato paste
  • One 4 – ounce can (drained weight) sliced mushrooms, drained
  • 1/4 cup dry red wine or beef broth
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons dried oregano, crushed
  • 1/2 cup pitted kalamata olives or pitted ripe olives, sliced
  • 2 tablespoons snipped fresh parsley
  • Salt
  • Ground black pepper
  • 8 oz. penne pasta
  • 1/3 cup grated or shredded Parmesan cheese
  • 2 tablespoons pine nuts, toasted


Peel eggplant, if desired; cut eggplant into 1-inch cubes.

Heat oil in a large saucepan and add the eggplant, onion and garlic. Cook until the eggplant begins to brown.

Add undrained tomatoes, tomato paste, mushrooms, wine or broth, the water and oregano.

Bring to a boil, lower heat to a simmer with the saucepan cover ajar and cook for about an hour or an hour and a half or until the sauce thickens.

Stir in olives and parsley. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Cook pasta al dente according to package directions. Drain.

Mix the cooked pasta into the eggplant sauce; add the Parmesan cheese and toasted pine nuts. Serve.

Herbed Shrimp Linguini


4 servings


  • 1 pound fresh or frozen peeled, deveined medium shrimp
  • 8 ounces dried linguini or spaghetti
  • 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons snipped fresh rosemary, plus additional for a garnish
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper


Thaw shrimp, if frozen. Rinse shrimp and set aside.

Cook pasta al dente according to package directions. Add the shrimp to the pasta water the last 3 minutes of cooking.

Drain well and place in a large pasta bowl. Add 2 tablespoons of the cheese, the garlic, olive oil, snipped rosemary, salt and black pepper and toss until well coated.

Sprinkle evenly with the 2 tablespoons remaining cheese and garnish with additional rosemary leaves. Serve immediately.

Rigatoni With Roasted Cauliflower and Sun-Dried Tomatoes


6 servings


  • 12 oz rigatoni pasta
  • ½ medium head cauliflower (about 1 pound), cut into florets
  • ½ cup sliced sun-dried tomatoes, packed in oil and drained
  • 1 medium red onion, cut into 1/4-inch wedges
  • 2 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 2 tablespoons sun-dried tomato oil from the jar
  • Kosher salt and black pepper
  • 2 ounces grated Pecorino cheese (about 1/2 cup), plus more for serving


Heat oven to 450° F.

On a large rimmed baking sheet, toss the cauliflower and onion with the thyme, sun-dried tomato oil and 1/4 teaspoon each salt and pepper.

Roast, tossing the vegetables once halfway through cooking, until golden brown and tender, 15 to 20 minutes.

Cook the pasta al dente according to the package directions. Reserve 1 cup of the cooking water; drain the pasta and return it to the pot.

Add the roasted vegetables, sun-dried tomatoes, Pecorino cheese and ½ cup of the reserved pasta cooking water to the pasta.

Toss to combine (add more cooking water if the pasta seems dry). Serve sprinkled with additional Pecorino cheese.


The Province of La Spezia is located in the Liguria region of Italy. Beaches that overlook the sea, spectacular views and small villages that dot the green valleys are all characteristic of La Spezia. The capital city of the province also called La Spezia, has a major naval base that is located at the head of the Golfo della Spezia, southeast of Genoa. The site was inhabited in Roman times, but little is known of its history before 1276, when it was sold to Genoa by the Fieschi family. The province became a maritime office during the French Empire era and also in the Duchy of Genoa era in the Kingdom of Sardinia. The province became an Italian naval headquarters after the transfer of the military fleet from Genoa in 1857 and, in 1923, it became the provincial capital. The province was severely damaged by bombing during World War II.


laspezia3Notable landmarks include the medieval Castel S. Giorgio, a 15th-century cathedral (rebuilt after 1945) and the naval arsenal (1861–69, also rebuilt after 1945) adjacent to the naval museum. The archaeological museum has a collection of prehistoric monoliths cut in the form of human figures and Roman artifacts from the nearby ancient city of Luni. La Spezia’s industries include shipbuilding, iron foundries, oil refineries and mechanical engineering. It is also a terminus for natural gas shipments from Libya.


la-spezia-beachThe warm Mediterranean air helps create good conditions for growing olives (producing exceptionally light flavored oil), wine grapes, corn, herbs (particularly basil), garlic, chickpeas, zucchini (especially the blossoms), potatoes, onions and artichokes.


The vineyards that cover the province’s sunny terraces are evidence of La Spezia’s ancient tradition of making wine. The Luni Hills, Levanto Hills and Cinque Terre wines are perfect with the local cuisine. Sciacchetrà, the famous D.O.C. wine, with hints of apricot, dried fruit and acacia honey, goes very well with the local sharp cheeses.

La Spezia also has vast expanses of olive groves on the coast and further inland. The oil produced in this area between the Alps and the Tyrrhenian Sea is protected by the Riviera Ligure D.O.P. label. The area’s oil is used in the preparation of most of the local dishes, especially the fish caught in the waters of the Ligurian Sea. Among such specialties are mussels stuffed with eggs, bread, mortadella, parmigiano, parsley and olive oil. The Monterosso anchovies, either sauteed with lemon juice, fried, stuffed or pickled are all popular in the province.

Mesciùa, a soup mixture of chickpeas, wheat, white beans, broad beans and lentils that are all boiled in olive oil, is a local favorite.  Pizza, flatbread made with chickpeas, focaccias and handmade pasta are made in abundance, as well as, the trofie al pesto, now widespread throughout the province.

600-05756267 © Arian Camilleri Model Release: No Property Release: No Focaccia, Riomaggiore, Cinque Terre, Province of La Spezia, Liguria, Italy

Culinary Specialties of La Spezia


Pasta With Chickpea Sauce


Chef Daniel Gritzer, says: “Using dried beans that are boiled with aromatics produces a more deeply flavored final sauce. The beans blend into a creamy sauce that coats the noodles, but doesn’t require dairy of any sort.”


  • 12 ounces dried chickpeas, soaked overnight
  • 1 large onion, cut in half
  • 1 head garlic, 3 cloves thinly sliced, the rest left unpeeled
  • 3 sprigs rosemary
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling
  • 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 4 cups cooked chickpeas, divided
  • 1 1/2 cups chickpea-cooking liquid or vegetable broth, plus more as needed
  • 1 pound short ruffled pasta
  • 1/4 cup chopped parsley, plus more for garnish


Place chickpeas in a large pot and cover with lightly salted water by at least 2 inches. Add unpeeled garlic, onion and rosemary. Cover and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat to a bare simmer and cook, adding water as necessary to keep beans submerged, until beans are very tender and creamy with no graininess left, about 2 hours. Discard onions, garlic and rosemary. Drain beans, reserving beans and liquid separately.

In a medium saucepan, combine oil, sliced garlic and red pepper flakes and set over medium heat. Cook, stirring, until garlic is lightly golden, about 3 minutes. Add 3 cups of the cooked chickpeas and most of the chickpea-cooking liquid and bring to a simmer. Remove from the heat and, using an immersion blender, blend to a smooth puree, adding more chickpea-cooking liquid if too thick. Stir in remaining 1 cup chickpeas, crushing some lightly with a wooden spoon or potato masher but leaving them mostly whole. Season with salt and pepper.

In a pot of salted, boiling water, cook pasta until just short of al dente. Reserve 1 cup of the pasta-cooking water, then drain the pasta. Return the cooked pasta to the pot and add the chickpea sauce along with 1/4 cup of the reserved pasta-cooking water. Set over medium heat and bring to a simmer, stirring until pasta is al dente and the sauce has thickened just enough to coat the pasta, about 3 minutes; add more reserved pasta-cooking water, 1 tablespoon at a time, if the sauce becomes too thick. Remove from the heat, stir in chopped parsley and drizzle in some fresh olive oil, stirring to blend. Season with salt and pepper. Spoon pasta and sauce into bowls, garnish with chopped parsley and serve immediately.

La Spezia Style Sea Bass


8 servings

Chef Maurizio Quaranta roasts sea bass with olives and tomatoes until the fish is crisp. He then spoons toasted warm pine nuts over the fish before serving.


  • 2 pounds Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and sliced 1/2 inch thick
  • 1 pound tomatoes, cut into large chunks
  • 3/4 cup pitted and chopped green or black olives
  • 1/4 cup torn basil leaves
  • 1/2 cup plus 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • Two 3-pound sea bass, cleaned
  • 1/2 cup pine nuts


Preheat the oven to 425°F. In a very large roasting pan, toss the potatoes, tomatoes, olives and basil with 1/2 cup of the olive oil. Season with salt and pepper.

Make 3 shallow slashes in both sides of each fish. Rub each fish with 1 tablespoon of olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Place the fish in the roasting pan, tucking them into the vegetables. Roast for about 40 minutes, until the vegetables are tender and the fish are cooked through.

Meanwhile, in a small skillet, toast the pine nuts in the remaining 1 tablespoon of olive oil over moderate heat, stirring, until golden, about 3 minutes. Spoon the pine nuts over the fish and vegetables in the roasting pan and serve right away.



Castagnaccio is a chestnut flour cake (castagna in Italian means chestnut) with raisins, pine nuts, walnuts and rosemary. The recipe does not use yeast, baking powder or sugar. According to food historians, the origin of this recipe goes back to the Ancient Romans, when a chestnut bread was made out of coarsely ground chestnuts and travelers’ and workers’ could pack the bread into their bags. Good chestnut flour is very sweet when you taste it raw (and this is why you do not need to add sugar to the castagnaccio). Taste your flour before using it. If you find it sour, this can be the result of two things: the flour is of poor quality or the flour is too old and has gone stale (chestnut flour doesn’t keep well. Purists only make castagnaccio in November-December, as the flour is prepared in October/November when chestnuts are available. In both cases, you can add some sugar to the mix to reduce the bitterness, but the final result may be inferior. Castagnaccio is best served with a cup of espresso or sweet wine like vin santo.


  • 250g (1/2 pound) chestnut flour
  • 2-3 cups water (500-700ml) – depending on the quality of the flour
  • 1/3 cup (75g) raisins
  • 1/4 cup (50g) pine nuts
  • 5 whole walnuts (shelled and coarsely ground)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 20 rosemary leaves


Pass the flour through a sieve and put it in a mixing bowl.

Add water to the mix slowly, while stirring. You want the batter to be soft enough to fall from the spoon, but not too liquid. Normally 2 1/2 cups (600ml) is the perfect amount of water, but you may need more or less.

Add the olive oil, the pine nuts, the walnuts, the raisin and mix them together thoroughly.

Oil a 9 inch round cake pan  Pour the batter in.

Sprinkle the rosemary leaves on top of the batter. Do not stir: you want them to be visible.

Bake the castagnaccio at 400 degrees Fahrenheit (200 degrees Celsius) for 30-40 minutes.

Take the cake out of the oven and let it cool on a wire rack.

You can eat plain or with a tablespoon of ricotta cheese on top, which is how Italian families traditionally eat it.

Wrapped in plastic or foil, the cake will last 4-5 days, but it will dry out a bit.


Fall brings us lots of hearty, nourishing toppings for pizza. If the chill in the air has you wanting to turn out some cool weather pizzas, think apples, butternut squash, sage, kale, mushrooms, cauliflower and figs for something different. Roasting vegetables first, makes them even tastier.

Roasted Fall Vegetables


  • 2 pounds (about 1 medium) butternut squash, peeled, seeded, and cut into 1 1/2-inch pieces
  • 2 pounds small red new potatoes (12 to 14), well scrubbed and quartered
  • 1 pound medium red onions (about 2 to 3), peeled and quartered
  • 1 pound carrots (6 to 8 medium), halved lengthwise, if thick, and cut into 1 1/2-inch lengths
  • 6 garlic cloves, peeled and smashed
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • Coarse salt and ground pepper


Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F. Toss the vegetables and garlic in a bowl with the oil, salt and pepper.

Divide the vegetables and garlic evenly between two rimmed baking sheets. Roast until the vegetables are tender and beginning to brown, 40 to 50 minutes, tossing them and rotating the sheets from top to bottom, halfway through cooking.


Fall Vegetable and Ricotta Pizza


  • Olive oil, for the baking sheet and drizzling
  • Flour, for dusting surface
  • 1 pound homemade or store-bought pizza dough, at room temperature
  • 8 ounces mozzarella cheese, grated (about 2 cups)
  • 6 cups (about 1/2 of the recipe above) Roasted Fall Vegetables, drained and coarsely chopped
  • 1 cup ricotta cheese
  • 1 tablespoon fresh rosemary leaves
  • Coarse salt and ground pepper


Preheat the oven to 475 degrees F. Brush a large baking sheet (preferably rimless) with oil.

On a lightly floured surface, roll and stretch the dough into a 12-by-16-inch oval (or as large as will fit on your baking sheet); transfer the dough to the pan.

Sprinkle dough with half the mozzarella. Scatter vegetables on top and drop tablespoons of the ricotta on top; sprinkle with remaining mozzarella and rosemary.

Drizzle with olive oil; season with salt and pepper. Bake until bubbling and golden, 20 to 25 minutes. Rest five minutes and cut into serving portions.


Pizza with Zucchini and Fresh Herbs

Sometimes I add a sliced red onion to the roasting pan with the zucchini and add it to the pizza.

Serves: 4


  • 1 lb homemade or store-bought pizza dough, at room temperature
  • 1 cup mozzarella cheese, grated
  • 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
  • 2 large zucchini, sliced into thin rounds
  • Juice of 2 large lemons, divided
  • Fresh parsley, chopped
  • Fresh thyme leaves
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Extra virgin olive oil


For the zucchini:

Heat the oven to 350°F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

Place the zucchini rounds in a bowl. Reserve a tablespoon of the lemon juice for the finished pizza and squeeze the remainder over the zucchini, drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. With your hands rub the mixture into the zucchini rounds in the bowl.

Then place them on the prepared baking sheet and roast in the oven for about 10-12 minutes, until soft.

For the pizza:

Turn the oven up to 500 °F. If using a pizza stone, allow the stone to heat in the oven for 30 minutes before baking on it.

Stretch out the pizza dough round onto a pizza peel dusted with flour or onto a cookie sheet or pizza pan (if not using a pizza stone).

Sprinkle the mozzarella cheese on top of the pizza dough and place the roasted zucchini evenly on top of the cheese. Drizzle with olive oil.

Sprinkle the fresh Parmesan cheese directly over the top and slide the prepared pizza into the oven.

Bake for about 8-10 minutes, until the crust is golden brown and the cheese is bubbling if using a pizza stone. A pizza pan will take longer, 15-20 minutes.

Remove the pizza from the oven, garnish with freshly chopped parsley, thyme, a grind of black pepper and the reserved tablespoon of lemon juice.


Deep Dish Mushroom Pizza

Serves 8


  • 1 lb homemade or store-bought pizza dough, at room temperature
  • 8 ounces Fontina Valle d’Aosta, fontina, provolone or mozzarella cheese, thinly sliced
  • 2 large sweet onions (such as Vidalia or Walla Walla), halved lengthwise and thinly sliced (about 4 cups)
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 cups assorted sliced mushrooms (such as shiitake, oyster, cremini, chanterelle, morel and/or button)
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 teaspoons snipped fresh rosemary
  • Snipped fresh parsley


Preheat oven to 375 degree F. Stretch the pizza dough across the bottom and up the sides of an oiled 13 x 9 x 1 inch baking pan. Arrange cheese slices on top of the dough in the pan.

In a large skillet, cook onions, covered, in 2 tablespoons olive oil over medium-low heat for 13 to 15 minutes or until the onions are tender, stirring occasionally. Uncover; cook and stir over medium-high heat for 5 to 8 minutes more or until onions are golden. Remove the onions from the pan and set aside.

In the same skillet, combine mushrooms, remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil, the garlic and rosemary. Cook over medium heat until the mushrooms are tender; drain well. Spoon mushroom mixture over the cheese on the pizza dough. Top with the onions.

Bake in the preheated oven for 30 minutes or until the crust bottom is slightly crisp and brown.

Cool in the pan on a wire rack for 5 minutes. Sprinkle with parsley. Cut the pizza into 3-inch squares and serve immediately.


Sausage, Fennel and Ricotta Pizza


  • 1 lb pizza dough, at room temperature
  • 8 oz Italian sausage, casing removed
  • 1 cup thinly sliced fennel bulb
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 cup ricotta cheese
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/3 cup thinly sliced red onion
  • 2 teaspoons fennel seeds
  • 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper (chili)
  • Salt and pepper


Preheat the oven to 500 degrees F.

Stretch the dough to fit an oiled 14-15 inch pizza pan.

Heat in a skillet over medium-high heat and add the oil and sausage, cook until the sausage is lightly browned. Break the sausage into large pieces. Remove to a paper towel lined plate.

Add the sliced fennel and cook until the fennel is tender.

Mix together the ricotta and garlic.

Separate the red onion slices and spread over the pizza dough along with the fennel seeds and the crushed red pepper. Top with spoonfuls of the ricotta and the sausage pieces. Sprinkle lightly with salt and pepper.

Bake for 20  minutes, until golden.


Antipasto Pizza

Makes: 8 servings


  • 1 lb pizza dough at room temperature
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 large onions, sliced in strips
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • 4 ounce jar marinated artichoke hearts, drained and sliced in strips
  • 16 ounce jar roasted red peppers, drained and sliced in strips
  • 2 small to medium tomatoes, sliced into thin rounds
  • 1 cup sliced black olives
  • 1/2 cup of crumbled feta


Place a pizza stone or invert a heavy baking sheet on the rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 500 degrees F.

In a large skillet heat the oil over medium heat. Cook the onions in hot oil about 10 minutes, until translucent. Stir in sugar and balsamic vinegar; cook until the juices bubble. Transfer the onions to a strainer set over a bowl. Drain for 3 minutes. Return the drained juices to the skillet. Cook over medium heat for 5 minutes until the mixture turns into the consistency of honey. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the cooked onions to skillet and stir to coat, then set aside.

For the pizza:

Stretch the dough into a circle that fits on a pizza peel (pizza-size spatula) or a rimless cookie sheet dusted with flour.

Top the dough with the onion mixture then arrange the artichokes, peppers, sliced tomatoes and olives on top. Sprinkle with feta cheese.

Bake for 10-15 minutes, until the toppings bubble and the pizza edges are golden brown. Let stand for 5 minutes before slicing.

You can also bake the pizza in a regular 14-15 inch pizza pan and cook the pizza for 10 minutes longer.

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