Healthy Italian Cooking at Home

Category Archives: celery



On these busy nights before the holidays, I like that I have a few homemade soups and homemade rolls or bread in my freezer. They are easy to defrost and heat and can be on the table in no time at all. This may be a quick dinner, but it is both nutritious and delicious.


Italian Escarole Bean Soup

This is one of our family’s favorite soups. I can remember my grandparents making this often and it seemed to be my grandfather’s favorite lunch. If you would like to make this soup vegetarian, it is easy to do. Swap out the chicken broth for vegetable broth and 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes (chili) for the dried sausage.


  • ½ onion, diced
  • 3 celery stalks, diced
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 2 cups dried white beans (cannellini), soaked overnight in water to cover and drained
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 16 cups no salt added chicken broth
  • 1 tablespoon dried Italian seasoning
  • 2 heads of escarole, washed and cut into small pieces
  • 1 cup chopped dried spicy sausage/salami
  • 1 cup short pasta
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt
  • Parmesan cheese for serving


Heat oil in a large Dutch Oven and add the onions, celery and garlic. Cook until tender. Add the Italian seasoning and soaked and drained beans. Heat for a minute or two and add the broth.



Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a simmer and cooked the beans for 30 minutes. Add the pasta, re-boil, lower the heat and cook for 15 minutes more.


Add the dried sausage, salt and escarole. Let simmer until the escarole wilts. Ladle into soup bowls and top with Parmesan cheese, if desired.

Sourdough Ciabatta Bread


I always have sourdough starter in my refrigerator that I keep in a crock, so it always available for baking. You will find that this bread will not puff up much in the oven. It will stay quite flat, like a slipper, hence its name (ciabatta means slipper in Italian). Ciabatta is one of Italy’s most delicious breads and it goes so well with soup. I like to make Ciabatta with a sourdough starter because it adds a nice tang to the bread.


  • 1 cup sourdough starter removed from the refrigerator the night before baking and placed in a covered bowl
  • 2 teaspoons instant yeast
  • 1 1/4 cups warm water
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 4 cups Italian 00 flour or unbleached all-purpose flour


In the bowl of an electric mixer using the paddle attachment combine the water, olive oil, yeast, sourdough starter, 1 cup of the flour and the salt. Stir in the remaining flour, a cup at a time, until the dough is the consistency of drop-cookie batter. Transfer to the dough hook attachment and knead the dough until it is smooth and satiny. The dough should be on the slack side, but not oozy; it needs to be able to hold its shape.


Place the dough in an oiled bowl and cover with plastic wrap or a damp towel. Place the bowl in a warm spot and let the dough rise, undisturbed, about 2 hours, or until doubled in size.

Punch the dough down and turn it onto a lightly floured work surface. Knead the dough gently and divide it into two pieces. Form the loaves into torpedo shapes, and place the loaves on a baking sheets dusted with flour and cornmeal. Cover with a damp towel.


Let the loaves rise until they look puffy. This should take approximately an hour. While the loaves are rising, preheat the oven to 425°F.

Brush or spray the loaves with water; a plant mister is good for this job. Bake for 10 minutes, spraying the loaves with water two more times.

Lower the oven to 375°F and bake for an additional 20 minutes.



Where I live it is very hot during the summer months and vegetables to do not grow well during July and August – in fact, they burn up. So what the north gets in July and August, we get in April and May and, then again, in October and November. If you are a reader of this blog, you know I belong to a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture).

Jeta Farms is part of the Slow Food USA movement that aims to rediscover and catalog forgotten flavors by documenting excellent food products that are in danger of disappearing. Since the international initiative began in 1996, more than 800 products from over 50 countries have been added to the list. The movement serves as a resource to those interested in reviving rare breeds and learning about endangered foods, with the goal of encouraging the continued production and consumption of these foods.

In the past, I have shared with you recipes I made with some of my share produce:

This is the first year my CSA farm has offered a share in the fall and here are some of the recipes I made.

Cheesy Patty Pan Squash 


Serves 3


  • 3 medium patty pan squashes
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 12 tablespoons shredded cheddar cheese


Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.

Cut the squash in half, place in an oiled baking dish and brush the tops with oil. Sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Bake for 25 minutes. Place 2 tablespoons cheese on top of each squash half and return the pan to the oven for five more minutes. Serve immediately

Stuffed Squash


Serves 4 as a side dish; 2 for a main course


  • 2 Gialla Nostrale squash (short, fat zucchini)
  • 1/4 of a medium onion, finely chopped
  • 1 celery stalk, finely chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon minced garlic
  • 1/4 cup chopped pickled (spicy cherry or banana) peppers
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/2 cup seasoned Italian breadcrumbs
  • Salt and pepper




Cut the squash in half lengthwise and scoop out the flesh leaving about a 1/4 inch shell. Dice the squash pulp.

Sprinkle the squash shells lightly with salt and pepper and place them in an oiled baking dish.

Heat the olive oil in a small skillet and add the onion, celery, garlic, diced squash pulp and the chopped peppers. Cook until all the liquid evaporates.

Add ½ teaspoon of salt and ¼ teaspoon of black pepper. Remove the pan from the heat, stir in the bread crumbs and allow the mixture to cool.

Heat the oven to 400 degrees F.

Stuff the zucchini shells with the bread crumb mixture. Bake for 30 minutes or until the stuffing is crispy and the squash shells are tender.

Both squash recipes above can be grilled on an outdoor grill instead of baked in the oven, if you prefer.

Roasted Sweet Potato Wedges


Serves  4


  • 2 large sweet potatoes, washed and patted dry
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 1/4 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried rosemary, crushed



Preheat the oven to 425ºF.

Peel the potatoes. Cut each potato into 8 wedges and place on a nonstick baking sheet. Drizzle with oil; sprinkle with the salt, pepper and the rosemary.

Roast for 15 minutes; toss and continue to roast until the potatoes are tender, about 15 to 20 minutes more. Serve immediately.

Southern Field Peas


Field peas or cowpeas, aren’t really peas at all. They are beans that grow very well in the South because they are heat and drought tolerant and grow in just about any soil. They’re categorized generally in four groups – crowder, cream, black-eyed and field peas and there are many varieties to be found in each of those categories.


  • 4 cups of freshly shelled southern field peas
  • 2 ounces bacon
  • 1 onion, diced
  • 2 celery stalks, diced
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 2 cups chicken broth, plus extra if needed
  • 3-4 sprigs fresh thyme


Cook the bacon in a large saucepan. Remove with a slotted spoon to a paper towel plate and reserve for later.

Add the onion and celery to the hot bacon fat and cook until tender. Add the peas and saute for a minute or two.

Add the thyme and 2 cups of chicken broth or just enough to cover the peas by about 1 inch. Add more if the peas are not covered.

Bring to a low boil and add the sugar and stir well.

Scoop off any foam that forms and discard it.

Cover and reduce the heat to medium-low, let simmer for about 25 minutes.

Add the pepper and salt, stir well and continue to cook for 10 more minutes.

Taste the peas for tenderness, they should be tender after this amount of time but not mushy. Drain.

Top with the crumbled bacon and serve.

Pasta with Grilled Sausage and Vegetables


I often cook a pound of Italian sausage on the grill and reserve half for another meal, such as pizza with grilled sausage and banana peppers from the garden.

Serves 6-8


  • 1 lb whole wheat penne pasta
  • 1 lb hot Italian sausage, divided
  • Half an onion
  • 1 large zucchini squash
  • 1 large yellow squash
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil, plus extra for brushing the sausage and vegetables
  • 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
  • Freshly grated black pepper




Heat an outdoor grill and oil the grates. Brush the sausage onion and the squashed with olive oil. Turn off the burners on one side of the grill and place the sausage over the indirect heat. Grill 15 minutes, turn the sausage over and grill another 15 minutes. During the last 15 minutes place the squash and onion over the direct side of the grill and cook until the vegetables are tender.

Remove the sausage and vegetables to a plate to cool. Slice half of the sausage into thin slices and reserve half for another use. Dice the vegetables; set aside the sliced sausage and diced vegetables.

Cook the pasta in boiling salted water until al dente. Reserve ½ cup of the pasta cooking water and drain the pasta in a colander. Set aside.

In the pasta pot heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil and add the garlic, parsley and oregano. Cook until the garlic is lightly browned and add the diced vegetables and sliced sausage. Cook until hot.

Add the drained pasta and the pasta cooking water. Stir until evenly combined. Add the Parmesan and black pepper. Serve immediately.



For a great tasting dinner, without a lot of cleanup, look no further than a one-pot meal. The recipes for these comforting and healthy dishes below are complete meals that use ingredients that are in seasons. Add a salad, if you like, and some great tasting bread.

One of the best features of one-pot cooking is that the recipes often include vegetables, meat, rice, pasta, fresh herbs and spices all in one pot, making it a great way to cook a convenient and nutritious meal the whole family. One-pot meals can be steamed, sautéed, braised or baked and the “one pot” can be a saucepan, skillet, crock pot, pressure cooker or baking dish.

I find a large ovenproof skillet with a cover, the best pot to have in your kitchen. It can do the work of several pans in one.


Eggs Over Roasted Vegetables

6 servings


  • 3 cups small broccoli florets (about 1 inch in size)
  • 12 ounces yellow potatoes, such as Yukon Gold, cut into 1/2 to 3/4 inch pieces (about 2 cups)
  • 1 large sweet potato, cut into 1/2 to 3/4 inch pieces (about 1 cup)
  • 1 small red onion, cut into thin wedges
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil, plus extra for the baking dish
  • 6 eggs
  • 2 ounces Italian Fontina cheese, shredded (1/2 cup)
  • 1/2 teaspoon cracked black pepper


Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.

Coat a 3-quart rectangular baking dish with olive oil. Add  broccoli, potatoes, onion, olive oil and 1/4 teaspoon salt, tossing to coat all the vegetables.

Spread the vegetable mixture evenly in the dish. Roast for 10 minutes. Stir vegetables; roast about 5 minutes more or until the vegetables are tender and starting to brown. Remove the baking dish from the oven and reduce the heat to 375 degrees F.

Make six wells in the layer of vegetables. Break an egg into each well. Bake for 5 minutes. Sprinkle evenly with the shredded cheese and bake for 10 minutes more or until the egg whites are set and the yolks start to thicken. Sprinkle with pepper. Serve with some crusty Italian bread.


Roasted Chicken With Beans

6 servings


  • Two 15-ounce cans rinsed and drained Great Northern beans, or other white beans
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 6 chicken thighs (about 2-1/4 pounds total), skin removed
  • Coarse sea salt and coarse black pepper for the chicken
  • 2 medium carrots, thinly sliced
  • 1 medium onion, cut into thin wedges
  • 1 stalk celery, sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • One 14 1/2 – ounce diced tomatoes, undrained
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme, crushed
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper


Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Sprinkle the chicken with the coarse salt and pepper.

In a large ovenproof skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat. Add chicken; reduce heat to medium-low. Brown the chicken about 10 minutes, turning once to brown both sides. Remove chicken from the skillet to a plate and set aside.

Add carrots, onion, celery and garlic to the drippings in the skillet. Cover and cook about 10 minutes or until the vegetables are tender, stirring occasionally. Stir in drained beans, undrained tomatoes, thyme, 1/4 teaspoon salt and cayenne pepper.

Bring to boiling. Arrange chicken thighs on top. Place skillet in the oven and bake, uncovered, about 25 minutes or until the chicken registers 180 degrees F on an instant read thermometer.


Spicy Braised Pot Roast And Vegetables

Coffee adds a rich, deep flavor to beef roasts.


  • 3 pound beef chuck pot roast
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon instant espresso coffee powder
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 large onion, cut into eighths
  • 1 green bell pepper, cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 1/2 cups beef broth
  • 1/4 teaspoon crushed red (chili) pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 2 pounds butternut squash, peeled, seeded and cut into 2-inch pieces


Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Trim fat from the meat. Rub meat with the espresso powder, salt and black pepper.

In a 6-quart Dutch oven brown roast on all sides in the olive oil over medium-high heat. Transfer to a plate.

Add onion, bell pepper and garlic to the Dutch oven. Cook and stir for 4 to 5 minutes or until the onion and garlic are tender. Return roast to the Dutch oven. Add broth, crushed red pepper and allspice. Bring to boiling.

Bake, covered, for 1 3/4 hours. Add squash. Bake, covered, for 45 minutes to 1 hour more or until the meat and vegetables are tender.

Transfer meat and vegetables to a platter; cover to keep warm. Bring liquid in the Dutch oven to boiling. Reduce heat. Simmer, uncovered, for 10 minutes until slightly thickened.

Serve sauce over meat and vegetables.


Chicago Style Deep Dish Pizza


  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 lb. homemade or store-bought pizza dough
  • 2 cups shredded part-skim mozzarella cheese
  • 1 cup frozen chopped broccoli, defrosted and dried on paper towels
  • 2 roasted red peppers, cut into thin slices
  • 1/4 cup pitted Kalamata olives and cut in half
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1 can chopped Italian tomatoes
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh basil
  • 1/4 cup freshly grated Pecorino Romano cheese


Let the dough come to room temperature about an hour before you are ready to make the pizza.

Preheat oven to 450 degrees F.

Coat a 12-inch cast iron or other heavy ovenproof skillet or baking pan with the 1 tablespoon of oil.

Stretch the dough into a 14 inch circle on a floured board or counter.

Carefully transfer the dough to the skillet and then turn the dough over, so both sides are evenly coated with oil. Gently press the edges of the dough 2 inches up the side of the skillet.

Sprinkle mozzarella evenly over the dough; top with broccoli, peppers, olives, tomatoes, garlic, basil and Pecorino cheese.

Bake pizza 45 minutes or until the dough is puffed and golden brown. Let rest for 5 minutes before cutting the pizza into slices.


Risotto With Shrimp And Peas

Technically this is not a one-pot meal because the broth needs to be heated before it can be added to risotto. At least it will be an easy pan to wash.

4 servings


  • 4 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 medium shallots, minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse sea salt, plus extra for the shrimp
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, plus extra for the shrimp
  • 1 cup Arborio rice
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • 1 cup frozen green peas
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1/4 cup heavy cream
  • 1/4 cup grated Parmigiano Reggiano cheese
  • 1 pound jumbo shrimp, peeled and deveined


Heat broth in a saucepan and turn the heat down to low.

Heat oil in a second saucepan over medium-high heat. Add shallots, salt and pepper; sauté 2 minutes.

Add rice and stir to coat in the oil. Cook, stirring constantly, 2 minutes.

Add wine and cook until the wine is absorbed, about 2 minutes.

Reduce heat to medium and add 1 cup warm broth. Cook, stirring constantly, until the liquid is mostly absorbed. Continue adding broth 1 cup at a time, cooking and stirring, until the rice is al dente, about 25 minutes.

Sprinkle the shrimp with salt and pepper. Add green peas and shrimp to the risotto and cook, stirring gently, until the shrimp are just until firm and bright pink.

Add butter, cream and cheese, stirring until incorporated. Serve immediately.



How To Make The Best Roast Chicken

Whenever possible, buy the best quality chicken you can find. The taste difference between a pasture-raised organic chicken and a traditional feedlot chicken is huge. Big chickens ― often labeled roasters (generally 6 lbs.) have a richer and more complex flavor than smaller ones. Young chickens (also called broilers and fryers; about 3-4 lbs.) can be roasted but by the time the skin is an appealing color, the breast meat of smaller birds is dry.  A roasting chicken, however, cooks evenly.

Season the entire chicken generously with salt and pepper. Don’t forget the back, underneath the wings, between the thighs and inside the cavity. Other additions, like ground spices and finely chopped herbs add flavor to the outside. Stuffing the chicken with aromatic ingredients, like citrus quarters, full sprigs of herbs, smashed garlic and onion can infuse it with flavor from the inside.

Some of my favorite flavor combinations:

All Purpose Dry Mix For Poultry

  • 1 1/2 teaspoons sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon dried basil
  • 1 teaspoon crushed dried rosemary
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon dry mustard powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon paprika
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground dried thyme
  • 1/4 teaspoon celery seed
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried parsley
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper

Mix the salt, basil, rosemary, garlic powder, mustard, paprika, black pepper, thyme, celery seed, parsley, cumin and cayenne pepper together until blended. Rub all over chicken, inside and out before roasting.

Other flavorings that go well with chicken include: lemon and orange juice, garlic, white wine, ginger, pesto, honey, maple syrup, smoked paprika, mustard and chili peppers.

Before you prepare the chicken for roasting, give it time to come to room temperature, about 45 minutes. Placing the chicken directly from the refrigerator into the oven will increase its roasting time and the chicken will cook unevenly. Another common mistake is not properly drying the chicken before roasting it. A damp chicken makes for limp, soggy skin. There’s no need to rinse the chicken, simply remove it and place it on a paper towel-lined sheet tray. Thoroughly pat it dry, inside and out, then proceed with your recipe.

While it is probably hard to break the habit, don’t wash raw chicken before cooking as germs can be spread through splashed water on the counter or in the sink. Cooking chicken at the right temperature will destroy any bacteria present and you need to make sure that chicken is properly cooked through; the juices should run clear and the meat should not show any signs of pink.

There are two common ways to roast a chicken: low and slow or hot and fast. To make the right decision, you first have to decide how you want to serve the chicken. For sticky, rotisserie-style skin with fall-apart meat, cook it at a low temperature for several hours. If it’s crispy, crackling skin you’re after, cook the chicken quickly at a high temperature. Sear the chicken on the stove-top in a pan (preferably cast-iron). Once the skin is golden, transfer the skillet to an oven set at 425˚F. The chicken will cook in just 35-40 minutes—depending on its size.

Once you take the chicken out of the oven, remove it from the pan and let it rest for 15 minutes. The juices need time to redistribute throughout the meat or else they’ll wind up on your cutting board. After 15 minutes the chicken will also be cool enough to carve.

Classic Roast Chicken

It is very practical to roast two chickens at the same time, so that you can have plenty of leftovers for weeknight meals.

6-8 Servings


  • One 5 pound roasting chicken, at room temperature
  • 2 ½ teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 2 medium yellow onions
  • 10 sprigs fresh thyme, plus 2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves
  • 4 garlic bulbs
  • 2 carrots, cut into 2-inch pieces (cut any large pieces in half lengthwise)
  • 2 stalks celery, cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 1/4 cup chicken broth, plus extra
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 2 sprigs fresh sage


Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.

Pat the chicken dry with paper towels and sprinkle inside and out with 1-1/2 teaspoons of the salt and the pepper. Cut one-half of one of the onions into two pieces; place onion pieces and the thyme sprigs in the body cavity of the chicken. Skewer neck skin to the back; tie legs to the tail. Twist wing tips under the back. Place chicken, breast side up, on a rack in a shallow roasting pan.

Cut the remaining 1-1/2 onions into wedges. Cut off the top 1/4 inch of the garlic bulbs to expose the ends of individual cloves. Keeping the garlic bulbs whole, remove any loose, papery outer layers.

In a large bowl combine onion wedges, garlic bulbs, carrots, celery, 1/4 cup broth, oil, bay leaves, sage sprigs, thyme leaves and the remaining 1 teaspoon salt. Arrange vegetables around the chicken; spoon liquid from the bowl over the chicken.

Roast, uncovered, for 1-1/4 to 1-1/2 hours or until drumsticks move easily and the chicken is no longer pink (180 degrees F), stirring vegetables a few times. Add small amounts of additional broth if the vegetables and the bottom of the pan begin to get too brown.

Remove from oven when cooked and cover with foil. Let stand for 15 minutes before carving. Remove and discard bay leaves and sage sprigs. Serve chicken with vegetables and pan juices.


Sticky Chicken Rotisserie Style

8 servings


  • 4 teaspoons salt
  • 2 teaspoons paprika
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 teaspoon white pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 2 onions, quartered
  • 2 (4 pound) whole chickens, at room temperature


In a small bowl, mix together salt, paprika, onion powder, thyme, white pepper, black pepper, cayenne pepper and garlic powder.

Remove and discard giblets from the chicken and pat dry with a paper towel. Rub each chicken, inside and out, with the spice mixture. Place 1 onion into the cavity of each chicken.

Place chickens in a resealable bag or double wrap with plastic wrap. Refrigerate overnight or for at least 4 to 6 hours.

Preheat the oven to 250 degrees F (120 degrees C).

Place chickens in a roasting pan. Bake uncovered for 5 hours, to a minimum internal temperature of 180 degrees F (85 degrees C). Let the chickens stand for 15 minutes before carving.


Honey-Spiced Roasted Chicken

6-8 servings


  • 1 (5-6 pound) whole roasting chicken, at room temperature
  • 1/2 cup honey
  • 1 tablespoon chili powder
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted


Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C). Pat the chicken dry with paper towels and place in a roasting pan.

In a bowl, mix together the honey, chili powder, cumin, cayenne pepper, salt and garlic powder. Using your hands, rub the honey mixture all over the chicken. Baste chicken with the melted butter.

Roast the chicken in the preheated oven until the skin begins to brown, 30 to 45 minutes. Baste the chicken with juices in the roasting pan. Cover the pan with foil.

Reduce heat to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) and roast until no longer pink at the bone and the juices run clear, about 1 1/2 to 2 hours, basting occasionally during roasting. An instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh, near the bone should read 180 degrees F (80 degrees C).

Remove the chicken from the oven, cover with a doubled sheet of aluminum foil and allow to rest in a warm area for 15 minutes before slicing.


Italian Flavored Roast Chicken

6-8 servings


  • 1 roasting chicken (6 to 8 lbs.), at room temperature
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh rosemary leaves
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh basil leaves
  • 14 cloves garlic, peeled
  • 6 rosemary sprigs, rinsed
  • 1 teaspoon salt, divided
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper, divided
  • 2 red bell peppers (about 1 1/2 lb. total)
  • 2 yellow bell peppers (about 1 1/2 lb. total)
  • 2 onions (about 1 lb. total)
  • 8 Roma tomatoes (about 2 lb. total)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/3 cup oil cured black olives
  • 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1/2 cup dry red wine
  • 1 cup chicken broth


Preheat the oven to 425°F.

Remove giblets and pull off and discard lumps of fat from the chicken. Pat dry and fold wing tips under the first joint. Set chicken, breast side up on a V-shaped rack set in a medium pan.

In a small bowl, mix chopped rosemary and basil. Starting at the neck, gently ease your fingers under the skin to loosen it over the breast area. Push 1/3 of the rosemary-basil mixture under the skin and spread it evenly over the breast.

Place 6 garlic cloves and 3 rosemary sprigs in the body cavity. Sprinkle chicken with 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon pepper.

Stem and seed the bell peppers; cut into 1/3-inch-wide strips. Peel onions and cut each into 6 wedges. Core tomatoes and cut in half lengthwise.

Distribute peppers, onions, and remaining garlic around the chicken in the pan. Set tomatoes, cut side up, on top of the pepper mixture and sprinkle vegetables with another 1/3 of the herb mixture and the remaining salt and pepper; drizzle with the olive oil.

Roast until the vegetables begin to brown and a thermometer inserted through the thickest part of the breast or the thickest part of thigh at joint reaches 180°, about 1 1/4 to 1 3/4 hours.

Insert a carving fork into the chicken cavity, lift the chicken and drain the cavity juices into the pan. Set the chicken on a rimmed platter; let rest, covered with foil, in a warm place for 15 minutes. With a slotted spoon, transfer the vegetables to a shallow bowl; sprinkle with olives and keep warm.

Skim and discard fat from the pan; add vinegar, wine, broth and remaining herb mixture. Stir often over high heat, scraping browned bits free, until reduced to 3/4 cup, 6 to 8 minutes. Pour through a fine strainer into a small pitcher or bowl.

Carve the chicken and serve with the vegetable mixture. Add pan juices and salt and pepper to taste. Garnish the serving platter with the remaining rosemary sprigs.




As the weather cools, there’s nothing better than filling, warming soups loaded with a variety of gorgeous fall vegetables. The foundation of onion and carrots is enhanced with chunks of squash, potatoes and strips of hearty greens in a broth infused with herbs and spices. Here are a few easy, to make soup recipes, using seasonal ingredients for you to try. What is your favorite fall soup?


Autumn Chowder

Serves: 4

  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 celery stalks, thinly sliced
  • 1 yellow onion, chopped
  • 1 red bell pepper, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 3 ears corn
  • 3 cups low-sodium vegetable broth
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 3/4 tsp ground coriander
  • 1/4 tsp dried thyme
  • 1 1/2 cups peeled and diced sweet potato
  • 1/2 cup half-and-half
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper


In a large pot on medium, heat oil. Add celery, onion and bell pepper and sauté until onion is tender, about 5 minutes. Add minced garlic and sauté until fragrant, 30 seconds. Sprinkle flour over vegetables and stir until coated and thickened, about 45 seconds.

Cut corn kernels off the cobs, reserving cobs. Add corn cobs, broth, milk, coriander and thyme to the pot. Cover, reduce heat to low and cook for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove the cobs.

Add corn kernels and sweet potato. Continue to cook until sweet potato is tender, 10 to 15 minutes. Stir in half-and-half, salt and pepper and cook until heated through, about 5 minutes.


Hearty Greens and Pasta Soup

Serves 6-8


  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 3 cloves garlic , chopped
  • 1 medium yellow onion , chopped
  • 1 bay leaf
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 4 plum tomatoes, cored and chopped
  • 2 carrots , chopped
  • 1 bunch Swiss chard (about 3/4 pound) , roughly chopped
  • 1/2 bunch escarole (about 1/2 pound) , stemmed and roughly chopped
  • 1/2 pound dried bow tie (farfalle) pasta
  • 1 (3-inch) Parmigiano-Reggiano rind , plus grated Parmigiano-Reggiano for garnish
  • 1/4 pound baby spinach


Heat oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add garlic, onion, bay leaf, salt and pepper and cook, stirring often, until golden brown, about 15 minutes. Add tomatoes and cook until most of the liquid is released and absorbed, about 5 minutes more. Add carrots and 8 cups water and bring to a boil, scraping up any browned bits from the bottom of the pot.

Stir in chard, escarole, pasta and Parmigiano-Reggiano rind. Reduce heat, cover and simmer until broth is flavorful and greens and pasta are tender, about 15 minutes. Stir in spinach and season with salt and pepper.

Remove and discard bay leaf and cheese rind from soup then ladle into bowls, garnish with grated cheese and serve.


Creamy Pumpkin Soup

6 servings


  • Nonstick cooking spray
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 3/4 cup chopped leeks
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3 cups peeled and cubed pumpkin 
  • 3 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves 
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 teaspoons honey
  • 3 tablespoons pumpkin seeds or pine nuts, toasted


Lightly coat an unheated large saucepan with nonstick cooking spray. Add olive oil; heat over medium-high heat. Add leeks and garlic; cook and stir until leeks start to brown, stirring occasionally.

Stir in pumpkin, broth, pepper and cloves. Bring to boiling; reduce heat. Cover and simmer for 30 to 45 minutes or until pumpkin is tender. Remove from heat; cool slightly.

Transfer half of the pumpkin mixture to a blender or food processor; cover and blend or process until smooth. Repeat with the remaining half of the pumpkin mixture. (Or use an immersion blender directly in the saucepan.) Return all of the pureed mixture to saucepan.

Stir in the milk, water and honey; heat through, but do not boil. Serve warm garnished with toasted pumpkin seeds or pine nuts.


Brown Rice Chicken Soup

Serves 8


  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 medium onion , chopped
  • 3 medium carrots , chopped
  • 2 stalks celery , chopped
  • 8 cups low-sodium chicken broth
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 cup long-grain brown rice
  • 1 whole boneless chicken breast , cut into 1/2-inch cubes
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 bunch of your favorite greens (spinach, kale, Swiss chard, collards) thick stems removed and leaves thinly sliced
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh parsley
  • Salt and pepper to taste


In a large pot over medium-high heat, heat oil and add onion, carrots and celery and cook about 8 minutes or until onion is translucent, stirring occasionally.

Add broth, water, rice, chicken and bay leaf. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer, cover and cook about 45-50 minutes or until rice is tender.

Remove bay leaf and stir in greens and continue cooking until wilted and tender, 3 to 5 minutes. Add parsley, salt and pepper.


Butternut Squash and Carrot Soup

6 servings


  • 3 cups peeled, diced butternut squash
  • 2 cups thinly sliced carrots (about 4 )
  • 1 cup thinly sliced leek or chopped onion
  • 1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • Two 14 1/2 ounce cans reduced-sodium chicken broth
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground white pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/4 cup half-and-half or light cream
  • Sour cream


In a large covered saucepan cook squash, carrots, and leek in hot butter over medium heat about 8 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add broth and thyme. Bring to boiling; reduce heat. Simmer, covered, for 25 to 35 minutes or until vegetables are very tender. Cool slightly.

Place one-third of the squash mixture in a food processor or blender. Cover and process or blend until almost smooth. Repeat with remaining squash mixture. Return all of the mixture to saucepan. Or use an immersion hand blender.

Add white pepper and nutmeg; bring just to boiling. Add half-and-half; heat through. If desired, garnish each serving with sour cream.

 Note To My Readers

My blog, Jovina Cooks Italian, has reached a milestone. I now have 3000 followers who have the blog emailed to them on a daily basis. Thank you all for reading and commenting on my posts. I am truly appreciative.

FALL BRIDGE—By Leonid Afremov

FALL BRIDGE—By Leonid Afremov (

There is plenty of cool weather produce available in the fall that you can make into delicious, seasonal salads.


Apples are plentiful during the autumn months. For salads, choose varieties that are sweet and crisp. Popular salad apples include Red Delicious, Fuji and Winesap. Buy firm apples that smell fresh and have smooth skins.


It’s also the time of year to sample all types of pears. Select those with even color and a slight blush. Be careful when handling pears because they are delicate and bruise easily. Although there are thousands of known pear varieties in the world, there are a handful recognized especially for their superb flavor and fresh eating qualities, such as Bartlett, Anjou, Bosc and Comice.

Tip: To keep pear slices from browning, sprinkle them with lemon juice or serve them immediately after slicing.


Fresh cranberries are very tart and are usually sweetened before they go into a salad. Dried cranberries add beautiful color and sweet chewiness to salads.


Grapes are harvested when sweet and ripe, so look for plump clusters that are firmly attached to green stems. Once at home, refrigerate grapes until ready to use and then rinse with cold water, halve them and mix them into your favorite salad.


Fall beets come in red, pink, orange, yellow and white varieties, as well as a range of sizes. Both the bulbous root and the leafy stalk are edible. For salads, select small to medium beets with firm, smooth skin and no soft spots or punctures. Those with stems and leaves still attached are best. The foliage should be green and fresh-looking. Store beets, greens and all, in a produce bag in the coldest part of your refrigerator for up to two weeks.

Tip: Use disposable latex gloves from the drugstore when peeling beets. They’re thin enough to allow dexterity while protecting your hands from stains.


Fennel is available in the fall and adds a hint of fresh sweet licorice flavor to any salad. This aromatic plant is pale green with a celery-like stem and feathery foliage. Its root base and stems can be treated like a vegetable and baked, braised or sliced and eaten raw in salads. The greenery can be used as a garnish or snipped like dill to enhance many recipes. Fennel’s licorice-like flavor is sweeter and more delicate than anise and, when cooked, becomes even milder and softer than in its raw state.


The cabbage family is wide and varied: broccoli and cauliflower are members. Some of the best heads of cabbage for salads are the crinkled-leaf “Savoy” types, also sold as Napa, January King or Wivoy cabbage. These are thin-leafed, tender and mild. When choosing a head of cabbage, look for fresh, crisp leaves that are firmly packed; the head should feel heavy for its size.

Cauliflower and Broccoli

These vegetables are available year-round, but they are especially plentiful in the spring and fall. When buying cauliflower, select one that is white or creamy white in color, firm and heavy. Cauliflower may be stored for up to one week in a plastic bag in the refrigerator. Keep it dry and any brownish colored portions may be trimmed away before cooking.

When shopping for broccoli, look for leaves and stems with dark green heads. Look for tender, young stalks that are firm with compact buds in the head. Yellow flowers in the buds or very rough bumpy heads may indicate the broccoli is past its prime.


Fall Spinach Salad

Serves 1



  • 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • Salt and ground black pepper to taste


  • 1 cup baby spinach leaves
  • 1 tablespoon dried cranberries
  • 1 tablespoon chopped  pecans
  • 1/2 of an apple, cored and diced
  • 1 tablespoon diced red onion
  • 2 tablespoons grated carrot
  • 1/4 of an avocado, peeled and diced
  • 1-2 tablespoons balsamic salad dressing, or to taste


Stir the balsamic vinegar and honey together in a bowl; slowly stream the olive oil into the mixture while whisking continuously. Season with salt and pepper.

Place spinach, cranberries, pecans, apple, onion, carrot and avocado into a salad bowl. Drizzle with balsamic vinaigrette and toss to coat. Serve immediately.


Wild Rice, Kiwi and Grape Salad

4 servings


  • 2 1/2 cups chicken stock
  • 1 cup wild rice
  • 3 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons honey
  • 2 kiwis, peeled and diced
  • 1 cup seedless red grapes, halved
  • 1/4 cup toasted pecans


Place broth in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Add rice, reduce heat to low and simmer, covered, for 45 minutes, or until tender. Drain excess liquid, cover and let cool.

Whisk together lemon juice, oil and honey in a small bowl until the honey is dissolved. Season with salt and pepper.

Place cooled rice in a salad bowl, along with kiwi, grapes and pecans. Add dressing, gently toss and serve.


Cabbage Salad – Waldorf Style

4 servings


  • 1/4 head savoy cabbage
  • 4 unpeeled apples, cored and diced
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped walnuts
  • 6 stalks celery, diced
  • 1/3 cup reduced fat mayonnaise
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt


Slice cabbage into thin pieces 1 to 2 inches long. Do not use the large ribs of the cabbage, as they are too strongly flavored for this salad.

In a large serving bowl, toss together the cabbage, apples, walnuts and celery.

In a small bowl whisk together the mayonnaise, honey and salt. Mix with the cabbage salad  until evenly coated. Serve immediately.


Beet, Fennel and Apple Salad

4 servings



  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon fresh orange juice
  • 1 tablespoon freshly grated orange zest
  • 1/2 teaspoon honey
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper


  • 1 medium cooked red beet, peeled and cut into matchsticks
  • 1/2 fennel bulb, trimmed, halved lengthwise, cored, and cut into matchsticks
  • 1/2 medium crisp tart apple such as Granny Smith, cored and cut into matchsticks
  • 1/2 cup firmly packed chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

For the dressing, in a small bowl, whisk together the oil, lemon juice, lemon zest, honey, salt and pepper.

In a medium bowl, toss together the beets, fennel, apple and parsley. Add the dressing and mix gently to coat all of the ingredients evenly. Serve immediately, or cover and refrigerate up to 8 hours. (If refrigerating, remove from the refrigerator and let stand 30 minutes before serving.


Fall Fruit & Nut Salad

6 servings


  • 3/4 cup cashew halves
  • 4 slices bacon, coarsely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh rosemary
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper


  • 3 tablespoons white wine vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • Salt and black pepper to taste


  • 1 (10 ounce) package mixed salad greens
  • 1 medium Bosc pear, thinly sliced
  • 1 cup halved seedless red grapes


In a large, dry skillet over medium-high heat, toast cashews until golden brown, about 5 minutes. Remove cashews to a dish to cool slightly.

Return skillet to medium-high heat, cook bacon strips until crisp on both sides, about 7 minutes. Remove bacon with a slotted spoon and drain on a paper towel. Coarsely chop bacon.

In a mixing bowl, stir together the bacon, rosemary, brown sugar, salt, cayenne pepper and toasted cashews.

In a small bowl, stir together white wine vinegar, mustard and honey. Slowly whisk in the olive oil and season with salt and pepper to taste.

In a large salad bowl, toss half the dressing with the greens, pear slices, grapes and sprinkle with nut/bacon mixture.

Serve with the remaining dressing in case anyone wants additional dressing on their salad.


Summer is here along with just about every vegetable you could possibly want to cook. It is also the best time to make a delicious chowder. Chowder usually indicates a soup that is rich and creamy with chunks of seafood and vegetables. The term may also describe a hearty soup made with corn or chicken.

The most famous, of course, is New England Clam Chowder. It is believed that the word “chowder” evolved from the French word “chaudiere,” the name of the pot in which French fisherman would boil their catch of the day with potatoes and other vegetables. French settlers in the New England colonies introduced the culinary tradition to America. “Chowder” first appeared in a written recipe in 1751 and, by the 1800s, American cooks were using mostly clams instead of fish because of the abundance of shellfish in the northeast.

Italian chowders and stews are usually made with seafood. The true story of cioppino begins with ancient Mediterranean fishermen who created the first fish soups and stews. These recipes were adopted by seamen and the recipes used local ingredients. Cioppino belongs to the same tradition as a chowder and a bouillabaisse. American cioppino is a story of immigration patterns, ethnic heritage and local adaptation. Food historians, generally agree, cioppino originated in California (in the San Francisco Bay area) and the group of Italian fisherman credited for the recipe immigrated from Northern Italy, specifically Genoa.

East Coast Italian Americans were fond of Manhattan Clam Chowder and put their special touches to it.


Italian American Clam Chowder

Serves 8


Medium-sized hard-shell clams provide the flavor for the broth and the tender clam meat for this hearty soup. Instead, the broth is briny and clean tasting with flavors from the sea standing out.

If you do not want to fuss with fresh clams substitute 4 cups of clam broth and 16 oz of canned clams.


  • 8 pounds clams, medium-sized hard-shell clams, such as cherrystones, washed and scrubbed clean
  • 2 ounces pancetta, finely chopped
  • 1 large onion, chopped small
  • 1 small red bell pepper, stemmed, seeded and finely chopped
  • 1 medium carrot, finely chopped
  • 1 stalk celery, finely chopped
  • 6 medium garlic cloves , minced
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1 teaspoon fennel seeds
  • 1/2 teaspoon hot red pepper flakes
  • 1 (8-ounce) bottle clam juice
  • 1 ¼ pounds Yukon Gold potatoes , peeled and cut into 1/4-inch dice
  • 1 large bay leaf
  • 1 28-32 oz. can Italian diced tomatoes, undrained
  • Salt and ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons fresh parsley leaves , chopped


Bring 4 cups of water to a boil in large stockpot or Dutch oven. Add the clams and cover with a tight-fitting lid. Cook for 5 minutes, uncover, and stir with a wooden spoon. Quickly cover the pot and steam until the clams open, 4-5 minutes. Transfer the clams as they open to a large bowl; cool slightly. Reserve the cooking water.

Holding the clams over a bowl to catch any juices, sever the muscle that attaches the clam to the shell and transfer the meat to a cutting board. Discard the shells. Cut the clams into 1/2-inch dice; set aside.

Pour the broth that collected in the bowl into a 2-quart glass measuring cup, holding back the last few tablespoons of broth in case of sediment; set the clam broth aside. (you should have 5 cups; if not, add some of the cooking water to make this amount. Rinse and dry the pot, then return it to the burner.

Fry the pancetta in the empty pot over medium-low heat until the fat renders and the pancetta is crisp, 5 to 7 minutes. Add the onion, pepper, carrot and celery, reduce the heat to low, cover, and cook until softened, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic, oregano, fennel seeds and pepper flakes and saute about 1 minute.

Add the reserved clam broth, bottled clam juice, potatoes and bay leaf. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to medium-low, and simmer until the potatoes are almost tender, 8 to 10 minutes.

Add the tomatoes, bring back to a simmer, and cook for 5 minutes. Off heat, stir in the reserved clams and season with salt and pepper to taste; discard the bay leaf. (Chowder can be refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 2 days. Warm over low heat until hot.) Stir in parsley and ladle the chowder into individual bowls. Serve immediately.


Corn and Potato Chowder


  • 2 slices of bacon
  • 1 cup onions, chopped
  • 1/4 cup flour
  • 2 ½ cups chicken broth
  • 2 cups red potatoes,unpeeled and diced
  • 2 cups fresh corn kernels
  • 8 ounces cream-style corn
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon hot pepper sauce
  • 2 cups whole milk
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste


Cook the bacon in a large skillet until crisp and remove to a plate. Crumble when cool enough to handle. Add the onion and cook in the bacon drippings over medium heat until the onion is lightly browned and tender.

Stir in flour until blended into the mixture.

Add chicken broth and stir to blend.

Add diced potatoes, corn and cream-style corn, pepper and hot sauce.

Bring to a simmer and continue cooking for 5 minutes, stirring frequently.

Cover, reduce heat to low and continue to simmer, stirring occasionally, until potatoes are tender.

Add milk and cook, covered, for another 15 minutes. Sprinkle crumbled bacon on top.

Serve warm with crusty bread.


Summer Vegetable Chowder

Servings 8-10


  • 2 cups chopped onions
  • tablespoon butter
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 celery ribs, diced
  • 1 cup peeled and diced carrot
  • 1 1⁄2 cups diced potatoes
  • 3 cups water or vegetable stock
  • 1⁄2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 1⁄2 teaspoons salt
  • 1⁄2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1⁄2 cup green beans, cut into 1 inch pieces
  • 1⁄2 cup red bell pepper, diced
  • 1 cup zucchini, diced
  • 2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped
  • 2 cups milk
  • 1 cup cheddar cheese, grated
  • 2 ounces light cream cheese


In a large soup pot on medium heat, sauté the onions in the butter and oil for 3 to 4 minutes.

Stir in the celery, cover, and cook until just soft, stirring occasionally.

Add the carrots, potatoes, water or stock, thyme, bay leaf, salt, and pepper and bring to a boil; then reduce the heat, cover, and simmer until the vegetables are just tender, about 5 minutes.

With a strainer or slotted spoon, remove about 1 1/2 cups of the cooked vegetables and set aside in a blender or food processor.

Add the green beans, bell peppers, and zucchini to the soup pot and cook until the green beans are tender, about 5 minutes.

Stir in the parsley, simmer for 2 more minutes, and then remove from the heat.

Discard the bay leaf.

Puree the reserved vegetables with the milk and cheeses to make a smooth sauce.

Stir the sauce into the soup and gently reheat.


Summertime Fish Chowder

4 servings


  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 large onion, finely chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 5 medium red potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 cup chopped carrots
  • 1 cup clam juice or fish stock
  • 1 cup no-salt-added diced tomatoes
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves or 1/4 tsp. dried
  • 1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika, plus additional for optional garnish
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne or to taste
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt, or to taste
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 to 2 cups water, as needed
  • 1 lb. firm-fleshed white fish, skin removed, cut into 2-inch chunks
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 1 tablespoon chopped parsley


In a large stockpot, heat oil over medium heat. Add onion and saute until soft, about 6 minutes. Add garlic and saute for 2 minutes.

Add potatoes and carrots, stir, then add fish stock and tomatoes, bay leaf, thyme, paprika, cayenne, salt and pepper. Add just enough water to cover potatoes. Simmer until the potatoes are tender, about 10 to 12 minutes.

Add fish and stir. Cook until fish is opaque and cooked through, about 8 to 10 minutes.

While fish cooks, heat milk in a small saucepan over medium heat until hot. Do not let it boil. Add milk to soup mixture and stir. Keep at low temperature.

To serve, ladle into shallow bowls. Top with chopped parsley and a sprinkling of smoked paprika.


Chicken and Summer Squash Chowder


  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 1 celery stalk, finely chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 pound skinned, boned chicken breast, cut into bite-size pieces
  • 6 cups low sodium chicken broth
  • 1 1/2 pounds summer squash, diced
  • 1 piece Parmesan cheese rind
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 cups 2% low-fat milk
  • 3/4 cup (3 ounces) shredded cheddar cheese
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/4 cup chopped basil


Saute onion, celery and garlic in olive oil in a large soup pot. Add chicken and sauté until lightly brown. Add broth and Parmesan cheese rind.  Simmer for 10 minutes. Add squash and simmer until the squash is tender. Remove the cheese rind.

Place flour in a bowl. Gradually add milk, stirring with a whisk until blended; add to soup. Cook over medium heat 15 minutes or until thick, stirring frequently. Stir in cheese, basil, salt and pepper.

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