Healthy Italian Cooking at Home

Category Archives: Salad Dressing


A potluck dinner is a gathering of people where each person in the group contributes a dish of prepared food to be shared among everyone in the group. Presentation is key, so think about how you’re going to serve it. Don’t cook anything that spoils when made in advance or where cooking times are vital.

The main thing to consider about a potluck dish is that the food is:

  • Easy to transport.
  • Easy to make.
  • Ok to eat warm or at room temperature, unless there are hot plates or refrigeration available.
  • Group-friendly; no super spicy dishes or  ingredients that have a high allergy risk.
  • Good even if not fresh. For example, a dressed Caesar salad will end up soggy and limp after a half hour.

I belong to a community group and we meet every month for a potluck dinner. Pasta dishes are popular with our group and here are some of the favorites.


Pasta Roll-Ups

16 servings


  • 2 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 lbs ground  turkey or beef
  • 2 teaspoons dried Italian seasoning
  • Two 28-oz can whole tomatoes in juice
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 16-20 dried lasagna noodles
  • Two 10-oz box frozen chopped spinach, thawed
  • Two 15-oz container ricotta cheese
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese


In a large skillet, heat olive oil over medium. Add onion and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add garlic and cook another minute.

Turn heat to medium-high and add ground meat, breaking it up with a spatula until the meat shows no sign of pink. Stir in the Italian seasoning, then add tomatoes and salt.

Reduce heat to medium-low, stir, cover and let simmer for 20 minutes, occasionally stirring and breaking up tomatoes with a wooden spoon.

Meanwhile, bring a large pot of water to boil. Cook pasta according to package directions, drain, rinse and allow to cool in a colander.

Preheat the oven to 400°F.

Squeeze all remaining moisture from thawed spinach and place in large bowl. Add ricotta cheese, eggs and a 1/2 cup mozzarella cheese to the bowl. Stir until combined

Spread 2 cups of tomato sauce in the bottom of a large baking dish. Lay a cooked lasagna noodle flat in front of you. Spread a tablespoon of ricotta mixture across the noodle and roll it up. Place the rolled pasta seam side down in the baking dish. Repeat with remaining noodles. Spread remaining tomato sauce over roll-ups, then top with remaining mozzarella cheese.

Bake, covered with foil, for 20 minutes. Remove foil and bake for 10 minutes.

Cover with heavy-duty foil and transport in an insulated carrier.


Orzo Salad

16 servings


  • 2 1/2 cups orzo pasta
  • 1 lb feta cheese, coarsely crumbled
  • 2 cups chopped Roma tomatoes
  • 1 cup chopped pitted Kalamata olives
  • 2 tablespoons snipped fresh basil
  • 2 tablespoons snipped fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 2/3 cup olive oil
  • 6 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon snipped fresh oregano
  • Salt and ground black pepper


In a jar with a screw-top lid, place olive oil, lemon juice, garlic and oregano. Shake vigorously to combine.

Cook orzo according to package directions; drain. Transfer pasta to a large bowl. Pour dressing over pasta and mix well. Cover; chill in the refrigerator for 1 to 2 hours.

Add feta, tomatoes, olives, basil, and parsley to the chilled pasta; stir to combine. Season to taste with salt and ground black pepper. Cover; chill in the refrigerator for 2 to 24 hours.


Orecchiette with Broccoli Rabe and Italian Sausage

12 servings


  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 8 garlic cloves, peeled and chopped
  • 2 pound lean Italian sausage, a combination of hot and sweet according to your taste, cut into bite-size pieces
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 2 pounds orecchiette
  • 2 bunches broccoli rabe
  • 1 ½ cups pasta water
  • 1 cup freshly grated Pecorino Romano cheese


Wash broccoli rabe in several changes of cold water. Cut off the bottom tips on the stalks and cut each stalk into one inch lengths.

Heat oil and stir in garlic in a large saute pan over medium heat. Add the sausage and saute until meat is brown.

Boil a large pot of water, add salt and pasta. Add the broccoli rabe during the last two minutes of the pasta cooking time. Reserve 1 1/2 cups of pasta cooking water.

Add the pasta water  to the cooked sausage and raise heat and cook until the sauce is hot.

Drain orecchiette and broccoli rabe and add to the sausage sauce in the skillet.

Using a wooden spoon, toss together for 1 minute. Remove from the heat and pour into a large serving bowl. Sprinkle with Pecorino Romano cheese.

Cover with heavy-duty foil and transport in an insulated carrier.


Tortellini and Vegetable Bake

12 servings


  • Two 9-ounce packages refrigerated tortellini
  • 1 medium carrot, thinly sliced
  • 1 ½ cups sugar snap peas, halved crosswise or green beans
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 pound skinless, boneless chicken breasts, cut into bite-size pieces
  • 1 cup sliced fresh mushrooms
  • 1/3 cup chicken broth
  • 2 tablespoons snipped fresh oregano or 1-1/2 teaspoons dried oregano, crushed
  • 2 teaspoons all-purpose flour
  • ½ teaspoon minced garlic
  • ½ teaspoon each salt and  pepper
  • 1 cup milk
  • One 8 ounce package cream cheese or light cream cheese (Neufchatel), cubed and softened
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 cup quartered cherry tomatoes
  • 1 small red or green bell pepper, coarsely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese


Cook tortellini in boiling salted water according to package directions, adding the carrot during the last 5 minutes of cooking and the sugar snap peas or green beans during the last 1 minute of cooking; drain.

Heat butter in a 12-inch skillet. Add chicken, garlic and mushrooms, and cook about 5 minutes or until chicken is no longer pink. Remove from the skillet.

Whisk together chicken broth, oregano, flour, salt and pepper in a mixing bowl. Add to the skillet  with the milk. Cook and stir until thickened and bubbly; add cream cheese.

Cook and stir until cream cheese is smooth. Remove from the heat. Stir in lemon juice. Add pasta mixture, chicken mixture, tomatoes and sweet pepper. Toss to coat.

Turn into an ungreased 13 x 9 x 2-inch baking dish or shallow 3-quart casserole.

Bake, covered, in a 350 degrees F oven for 30 to 35 minutes or until heated through. Stir mixture and sprinkle with Parmesan cheese.

Cover with heavy-duty foil and transport in an insulated carrier.


Butternut Squash Mac and Cheese

12 servings


  • 2 pounds rigatoni pasta
  • 3 pounds butternut squash, peeled, seeded and cut into chunks
  • 7 cups milk, divided
  • ½ cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 pound Italian Fontina cheese, shredded (about 4 cups)
  • 2 large sweet onions, diced
  • 6 ounces sourdough bread
  • 3 tablespoons butter, melted plus 1 tablespoon
  • Fresh flat-leaf Italian parsley


Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.

Lightly butter a large baking pan; set aside.

Cook pasta according to package directions. Drain; transfer to a large bowl.

In a large saucepan combine the squash and 6 cups of the milk over medium-high heat. Bring to boiling; reduce heat to medium and simmer until the squash is tender when pierced with a fork, 18 to 20 minutes.

Stir together remaining 1 cup milk and flour; stir into squash mixture. Bring to boiling; cook until thickened, 2 to 3 minutes. Stir in 2 cups of the Fontina cheese until melted; keep warm.

In a very large skillet or Dutch Oven heat the 1 tablespoon of butter. Add onions to the skillet; cover and cook over low heat 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Uncover and increase heat to high. Cook 4 to 6 minutes more, stirring, until onions are golden. Add to the pasta in the bowl along with the squash-cheese mixture. Toss well to combine, then transfer to the prepared baking dish.

Place bread in a food processor and pulse with two or three on/off turns to form large coarse crumbs. Transfer to a small bowl; mix with the 3 tablespoons of melted butter. Sprinkle remaining cheese and the bread crumbs over the pasta mixture.

Bake until the top is browned, about 14 to 15 minutes. Cool 5 minutes. Sprinkle with parsley. Cover with heavy-duty foil and transport in an insulated carrier.



Beans are a great source of fiber, antioxidants and protein. Many people choose the simplicity of canned beans over cooking dried beans. However, canned beans are more expensive per serving and often have other added ingredients. Cooking dried beans is not difficult. Here is some basic information.

Soaking the Beans

Always sort through beans to remove tiny stones or debris
Rinse well with water before adding beans to a large bowl
Add enough cold water to cover by 2 inches
Beans will be fully hydrated within 4 hours, but can soak for up to 24 hours
In hot weather, refrigerate beans while they soak

Quick Soak Technique

Combine beans and water in a pot and heat to boiling
Cook for 3 minutes
Remove from the heat, cover tightly, and set aside for an hour

Cooking Facts

Dry beans should always be cooked in soft water or they will be tough
You can add a pinch of baking soda to the pot if you have hard water
Adding salt to beans at the beginning of cooking toughens the skins and increases cooking time

Other Information

Dry beans have a shelf life of one year
Store in an airtight container in a cool, dry place
Always store leftover beans in their cooking liquid and refrigerate for up to 5 days or freeze for up to 6 months

Dried Bean Guide

1/3 cup dry beans = 1 cup cooked beans

1/2 cup dry beans = 1 1/2 cups cooked beans

2/3 cup dry beans = 2 cup cooked beans

1 cup dry beans = 3 cups cooked beans

Basic Recipe for Cooking Dried Beans



  • 1 pound dried beans
  • Pinch baking soda
  • 1 carrot, cut in half
  • 1 celery stalk, cut in half
  • 1/2 onion, cut in half
  • 1 sprig rosemary or 1 bay leaf


The night before serving, rinse the beans, picking out any bad ones and place in a large bowl. Cover with water, add a pinch of baking soda and let soak at least 12 hours.

The next day, drain well. Place the beans in a heavy stock pot with the vegetables and rosemary and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook until the beans are tender.

Check them after 30 and 45 minutes because they may be done, depending on how fresh the beans are.

Remove the vegetables and rosemary sprig. Refrigerate until ready to use the beans. Drain and use the beans in the recipes below.

Clams and White Beans



  • 2 cups cooked white beans
  • 2 tablespoons cubed pancetta
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/4 white or yellow onion, diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon oregano
  • 2 pounds clams
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • 1/4 cup chopped flat leaf parsley
  • Salt and freshly grated black pepper


In a large frying pan, add the pancetta and the olive oil and cook on medium heat until the pancetta has rendered its fat and is beginning to brown, about 10 minutes.

Remove the pancetta with a slotted spoon to a paper towel lined plate, reserving the fat in the pan. Add the onion and garlic to the pan and saute until soft, about 7 minutes.

Add the oregano, crumbling it with your hands to release the flavors, and then add the clams.

Continue cooking the clams, shaking and tossing them, until they all open. Discard any clams that do not open. Add the wine and beans, stir and return the pancetta to the pan. Heat until the beans are hot. Test for seasoning and add salt if needed.

In each bowl, ladle a portion of beans, some of the clams and their sauce, and a sprinkling of parsley. Serve with plenty of freshly grated black pepper.

Large White Beans with Vinaigrette



These giant beans and vegetables go well together. Serve with sandwiches, over greens or as part of an antipasto platter.


  • 1/2 pound dried gigante beans or lima beans
  • 1/2 yellow onion, chopped
  • 1/2 head cauliflower, cut into florets (about 2 cups)
  • 3 large carrots, cut into 1/2-inch thick slices
  • 1/2 cup white wine vinegar
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon crushed red chili flakes
  • 2/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped pepperoncini


Place beans in a large bowl and cover with 2 inches cold water. Let soak overnight.

Drain beans and place in a large sauce pot. Cover with 4 inches water and add the onion. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium and simmer 1 to 1 1/2 hours or until the beans are tender. Drain well.

Steam cauliflower and carrots until tender, 10 to 12 minutes. Drain well.

In a large bowl, whisk together the vinegar, salt and chili flakes. In a slow, steady stream, whisk in oil until blended. Add beans, pepperoncini and vegetables, mix well and let marinate at least 4 hours or overnight, stirring occasionally.

Sautéed Spinach with Cannellini Beans



  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 3 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes (chili)
  • 1 1/2 pounds spinach, trimmed and roughly chopped, (or escarole, curly endive, mustard greens, kale or broccoli rabe)
  • 1 cup low-sodium chicken or vegetable broth
  • 2 cans no-salt-added cannellini or other white beans, rinsed and drained or 4 cups dried beans as cooked above
  • 1/4 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • Grated Parmesan cheese, for serving


Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add garlic and red pepper flakes and cook, stirring often, until the garlic is golden brown, about 5 minutes. Add the broth to the skillet and deglaze, scraping up any browned bits. Add beans and simmer until hot throughout, 2 to 3 minutes.

Add greens (in batches, if needed) and cook, tossing often, until wilted and bright green, 3 to 4 minutes. Mix well and season with salt and pepper. Serve piping hot with the cheese as a garnish.

Tomato Soup with Beans


Serves 8


  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 6 cups chopped fresh tomatoes or canned Italian chopped tomatoes with juice
  • 2 cups chicken or vegetable broth
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 2 cups pinto, cannellini, kidney or black beans, canned and drained, or cooked, as directed above
  • Salt and pepper to taste


Heat the oil in a large soup pot. Add the chopped onion and cook on medium heat until soft. Add the minced garlic and cook a minute more.

Add the tomatoes and broth. Cook about 20 minutes

Stir in the brown sugar. Add half of the beans to the mixture. Use an immersion blender to blend the beans into the soup. Add the rest of the beans and salt and pepper to taste. Heat until hot.

Beef and Bean Burger


My favorite steak seasoning is Penzey’s Chicago Steak Seasoning that contains salt, Tellicherry black pepper, sugar, garlic, onion, lemon zest, citric acid and natural hickory smoke flavor. You will need to add salt to the recipe below if your favorite steak seasoning does not have it.


  • 1/2 cup home cooked or canned (black or pinto) beans, rinsed and drained well
  • 3/4 lb lean ground beef
  • 1/4 cup dried bread crumbs
  • Olive oil for brushing on the burgers
  • 1 teaspoon steak seasoning
  • 4 thin slices Cheddar cheese
  • 4 hamburger buns, lightly toasted
  • Thinly sliced tomatoes, sliced red onion and lettuce leaves


Preheat an outdoor grill to medium. Oil the grill grates.

Place the beans on a cutting board and mash with the back of a fork or large spoon until smooth, but still a bit chunky. Transfer to a large mixing bowl.

Add the beef, bread crumbs and steak seasoning; mix until well combined.

Divide the beef mixture evenly and shape into 4 patties, each a bit larger in diameter than the hamburger buns. Create a small dimple in the center of the burger patty by pressing down with your fingers.

Brush both sides of the burgers lightly with olive oil.

Place the patties on the grill and cook until no longer pink inside and an instant-read thermometer registers about 160°F, 4 to 5 minutes per side. Place cheese slices on top of the patties one minutes before they are done. Transfer the burgers to the toasted buns. Serve with tomatoes, sliced onion and lettuce leaves.


Cristoforo Colombo (Columbus) was born in 1451 in the territory of the Republic of Genoa, now part of modern Italy (in Liguria). Once a fishing village, Genoa grew without plan or forethought across a series of hillsides. Its roads meander down steep slopes some over 100 feet above your head, many accessible only by walking or by helicopter. Because of its topography, Genoa has evolved as a diverse collection of neighborhoods. Navigating from one part of the city to another can be challenging. Genoa’s old port still offers the atmosphere of a working waterfront. At the height of its economic powers, Genoa bought, sold and shipped goods all over Europe and established trade colonies on the Black Sea, in the Crimea and Turkey.

The first recipe identified in print as Genoese was a formula for torta alla genovese (a type of pie filled with apples, dates, raisins, almonds, hazelnuts and pine nuts) that appeared in 1520 in, Libre del coch, the cookbook by Mestre Robert, probably the chef to the king of Naples. In the centuries that followed, Genoa’s culinary sophistication grew.

With simple cooking methods and an abundance of vegetables, herbs and olive oil, the Genoese have skilfully invented dishes that have become world known, such as pesto and focaccia. Other specialities include filled pasta, such as ravioli and the local pansotti (with a Swiss chard, egg and ricotta filling); corzetti, a fresh pasta made in the shape of small figure eights, savory herb pies filled with cooked Swiss chard or artichokes, squash, spring herbs, eggs and cheese and stuffed squash flowers. Other typical dishes of the local cuisine include vegetable minestrone alla genovese; farinata, a thin, unleavened pancake made from chickpea flour, water, salt and olive oil and cooked in a wood-burning oven, fried sticks of chickpea flour, stuffed veal rolls and stuffed vegetables. Being on the sea, the region offers many seafood specialties, including fish soups, stews and salads.

Columbus Day Menu


Minestrone, Genoa Style

8-10 servings


  • 1/4 pound Italian dried beans, soaked overnight
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 cup chopped onion
  • 2 leeks, washed and chopped, white and light green part only
  • 1 medium eggplant (1 pound), peeled and diced
  • 2 medium carrots, peeled and sliced
  • 2 ribs celery, sliced
  • 2 medium potatoes, peeled and diced
  • 2 medium tomatoes, diced
  • 2 cups hot vegetable broth
  • 4 cups hot water, plus extra if needed
  • 1 cup chopped raw spinach
  • 1 cup diced zucchini
  • 1 cup shredded green cabbage
  • 1/4 pound thin spaghetti
  • 3 tablespoons Basil Pesto
  • Salt and pepper to taste


Drain the beans from the soaking water, place them in a pot, cover with water and cook about 30 minutes, or until still quite al dente, and set aside.

In a large pot, heat the oil. Add the onion, leeks, eggplant, carrots, celery and potatoes and sauté for about 8 minutes, or until the vegetables just begin to exude their juices.

Add the tomatoes, hot broth, hot water, beans and additional hot water, if needed to just cover the mixture. Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a simmer and cook covered for about 30 minutes.

Add the spinach, zucchini, cabbage and pasta and cook another 20 minutes or until the pasta is al dente. Stir in the Pesto. Add salt and pepper to taste and serve immediately.


Farinata (Chickpea Flatbread)


  • 1 1/4 cup of chickpea flour
  • 1 1/2 cups of water
  • 1 teaspoon kosher or sea salt
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 6 sage leaves, thinly sliced
  • 1 teaspoon of chopped rosemary


Sift chickpea flour into a bowl and add the  salt, pepper, sage and rosemary. Stir.

Slowly add the water, whisking the whole time. Allow the batter to rest for at least 1 hour or as long as overnight.

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.

If any foam has formed on the chickpea batter, remove with a spoon.

Pour olive oil into a 12-inch round baking pan  Add the  batter into the pan.For a crisp farinata, bake for about 25 minutes. Check on it, though, as ovens differ and you do not want the batter to burn! For a soft bread, bake for about 15-20 minutes. Allow to cool before cutting!


Riccola al Forno (Fish, Roasted with Potatoes and Olives)

In Genoa this dish is made with riccola, a fish similar to U.S. pompano.

Serves 4


  • 2 lbs. red new potatoes scrubbed and quartered
  • 4 cloves garlic halved lengthwise
  • 1/2 teaspoon crushed dried rosemary
  • 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • Coarse salt and ground pepper
  • 4 fish fillets (8 ounces each)
  • 1/2 pint grape tomatoes halved
  • 1/2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
  • Lemon wedges for serving


Preheat oven to 450 degrees F.

On a large rimmed baking sheet, toss potatoes with garlic, rosemary and 1 tablespoon oil; season generously with salt and pepper. Arrange potatoes in a single layer, cut side down. Bake, tossing potatoes once, until beginning to brown, about 20 minutes.

Rub fish with the remaining teaspoon of oil; season all sides with salt and pepper.

Remove baking sheet from the oven. Add tomatoes and olives to the potatoes; stir to combine. Push vegetable mixture to one side; place fillets flat on the baking sheet, next to the vegetables.

Return the pan to the oven and roast until the fish is cooked through and the potatoes are brown and tender, 15 to 20 minutes. Transfer fish and vegetables to a serving platter. Serve immediately, garnished with lemon wedges.


Zucchini Salad


  • 1 large zucchini, sliced into paper-thin slices using a mandoline
  • 2 ripe Roma tomatoes, cut into small dice
  • 2 tablespoons pignoli nuts (pine nuts)
  • 1 scallion (green onions), finely chopped
  • 3 tablespoons good extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon whole grain mustard
  • 1 salted anchovy filet
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • Pinch of salt and black pepper


Arrange the zucchini on a serving platter and sprinkle with tomato, scallions and pine nuts.

Using a mortar and pestle, pound the anchovy and the mustard together and squeeze in the lemon juice and then mix well. Whisk in the olive oil to make the vinaigrette. Season with salt and pepper and drizzle all over the sliced zucchini.


Sweet Genoa Fritters


  • 2 cups flour
  • 1/4 cup lard or butter
  • 1 1/4 tablespoons sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 egg
  • 3 tablespoons white wine
  • Vegetable oil for deep frying
  • Powdered sugar for dusting


Mix the sugar, salt and flour.

Cut the butter or lard into small pieces and mix it with the flour.

Beat the egg. Mix the white wine and egg together.

Combine the liquid and flour mixtures and work into a dough, kneading for about 5 minutes (Add more flour if it’s too soft, add more wine if it’s too dry).

Shape the dough into a ball, wrap in clear plastic and let it rest for about an hour at room temperature.

Using a pasta machine (or a rolling-pin), roll out the dough to a thickness of 1/8 inch.

Using a pastry wheel cut the dough into rectangles — 4 inches long and 1 1/2 wide.

Heat the oil and fry the fritters, a few at a time, until they are barely golden.

Remove each fritter and place on kitchen paper towels to drain.

Before serving dust with powdered sugar.


Yesterday we roasted chicken and today we have leftovers. So what can you do with the leftovers?

It makes sense for us to get smarter about fully using the food that we purchase. And that means getting smarter about leftovers.

Even a small amount of  leftover roast chicken can easily become another meal and there are numerous ways to do this without being boring. With leftover chicken in the refrigerator you can make convenient and versatile weeknight dinners,

Leftover chicken can be stored in the fridge in a sealed container for three to four days, and in the freezer for about four months.  Just remember to plan your leftover meals ahead so that when you’re at the market, you can pick up the ingredients you’ll need.

How much meat from a 6-lb. roasting chicken?

Leftover Amount Yield
1 whole chicken 7 cups
1/2 chicken 3-1/2 cups
1 breast 1 cup
1 leg (thigh and drumstick) 1 cup

Make A Salad


Roasted Chicken and Romaine Salad

For 4 servings


  • 1/2 cup reduced fat mayonnaise
  • 2 tablespoons freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon anchovy paste
  • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • 1 large garlic clove, minced
  • 1/4 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper


  • Leftover roast chicken (about 6 ounces per serving), sliced thin
  • 3 hearts of romaine, trimmed and torn into pieces
  • Extra-virgin olive oil
  • 4 slices country-style white bread, each about ¾ inch thick
  • Additional grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese and black pepper for garnish


Whisk the dressing ingredients until smooth.

Brush the bread slices with olive oil and toast on both sides in the broiler until lightly brown. Cut the bread into small cubes to make croutons.

Cut the chicken into thin slices and cut the bread into croutons. Place the romaine on serving plates and top with chicken and croutons. Serve right away with the dressing on the side.

Mix the romaine, chicken and croutons in a large salad bowl. Add the dressing and gently toss.

Divide the salad onto 4 serving plates and garnish with black pepper and cheese.


Make Chicken Soup


To make the broth:

After you cut all the meat off the chicken, use the bones to make broth. Place the bones in a large soup pot and add 4 quarts of water.Bring to a boil. Lower the heat, cover the pot, and simmer for 1 hour.

Place a colander or strainer over a large bowl. Pour the contents of the pot into it. Let the mixture cool. Pick through the bones and remove any meat; discard skin and bones. Add the meat to the broth; cover and set aside.

To make the soup:

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 medium onions, coarsely chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 8 ounces button mushrooms, thinly sliced
  • 7 stalks celery, cut into 1/2-inch slices
  • 4 medium carrots, cut into 1/4-inch slices
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley
  • Additional cooked chicken and noodles, optional


Add the oil to the soup pot and heat over low heat. Add the onions. Cook, stirring often, for 8 minutes or until softened. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute.

Add the mushrooms, celery, and carrots. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 15 minutes.

Add the salt, black pepper, paprika, cayenne pepper and parsley. Continue cooking, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes more or until the carrots and celery are almost softened.

Add the broth and chicken mixture to the vegetables in the soup pot. Taste for seasoning and bring to a boil, lower the heat and simmer for 30 minutes. Add cooked noodles and extra cooked chicken, if desired.

Make A Pasta Dish


Chicken Lasagna Rolls

6 servings


  • 6 dried lasagna noodles
  • One 8 ounce package reduced-fat cream cheese (Neufchatel), softened
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1/4 cup grated Romano cheese or Parmesan cheese
  • 1 tablespoon snipped fresh chives
  • 1 ½ cups chopped cooked chicken
  • 1/2 of a 10 ounce package frozen chopped broccoli, thawed and drained (1 cup)
  • 1/2 cup bottled roasted red sweet peppers, drained and chopped
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 cup marinara pasta sauce


Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Spray a  3-quart rectangular baking dish with olive oil cooking spray.

Cook lasagna noodles according to package directions. Drain noodles and cut each noodle in half crosswise; set aside.

For the cheese sauce:

In a medium mixing bowl beat the cream cheese with an electric mixer on medium speed for 30 seconds. Slowly add milk, beating until smooth. Stir in Romano cheese and chives.

For the filling:

In a medium bowl stir together 1/2 cup of the white sauce, the chicken, broccoli, roasted red peppers and black pepper. Place about 1/4 cup of the filling at an end of each cooked noodle and roll. Arrange rolls, seam sides down, in the prepared baking dish.

Spoon the remaining white sauce over the rolls. Top each roll with some marinara sauce. Cover with foil. Bake for 35 to 40 minutes or until heated through.

Make A Sandwich


This sandwich can also be grilled in a panini press. You can also add a slice of your favorite cheese to each sandwich.

Chicken Focaccia Sandwich

6 servings


  • One round 8 inch tomato flavored focaccia bread or sourdough bread
  • 1/3 cup reduced fat mayonnaise
  • 1 cup lightly packed fresh basil leaves
  • 2 cups sliced roasted chicken
  • ½ cup roasted red sweet peppers, drained and cut into strips


Using a long serrated knife, cut bread in half horizontally. Spread cut sides of the bread halves with mayonnaise..

Layer basil leaves, chicken and roasted sweet peppers between bread halves. Cut into wedges.

Dinner Entrée


Roasted Chicken Stuffed Zucchini

Yield: 2 halves


  • 1 large zucchini
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • ½ cup finely diced onion
  • 2 tablespoons red bell pepper, diced
  • ¼ cup cherry or grape tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 small minced garlic clove
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh basil or parsley
  • ½ cup leftover roast chicken, chopped
  • Sea salt and cracked black pepper, to taste
  • 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
  • Pinch crushed red pepper flakes
  • 2 tablespoons shredded  mozzarella cheese


Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.

Cut both ends off the zucchini and cut in half lengthwise. Use a spoon to scoop out most of the inner flesh, taking care to leave the shells (zucchini skin) intact. Chop the zucchini flesh.

Season the shells with sea salt and cracked black pepper and place on a foil lined baking sheet or in a glass baking dish that has been sprayed with olive oil cooking spray.

Add the oil to a skillet and heat on medium. Add the onion and cook 2-3 minutes. Add the bell pepper to the pan and cook for 4-5 minutes.

Add the garlic and cook for 30 seconds. Add the chopped zucchini flesh, tomatoes and basil. Cook for 3-5 minutes or until the tomato starts to soften. Mix in the cooked chicken pieces to reheat and season everything to taste with sea salt, cracked black pepper, crushed red pepper and lemon juice.

Scoop the filling equally into each zucchini shell and sprinkle with the shredded mozzarella cheese. Bake uncovered for about 30 minutes or until the zucchini is fork tender.

FALL BRIDGE—By Leonid Afremov

FALL BRIDGE—By Leonid Afremov (

There is plenty of cool weather produce available in the fall that you can make into delicious, seasonal salads.


Apples are plentiful during the autumn months. For salads, choose varieties that are sweet and crisp. Popular salad apples include Red Delicious, Fuji and Winesap. Buy firm apples that smell fresh and have smooth skins.


It’s also the time of year to sample all types of pears. Select those with even color and a slight blush. Be careful when handling pears because they are delicate and bruise easily. Although there are thousands of known pear varieties in the world, there are a handful recognized especially for their superb flavor and fresh eating qualities, such as Bartlett, Anjou, Bosc and Comice.

Tip: To keep pear slices from browning, sprinkle them with lemon juice or serve them immediately after slicing.


Fresh cranberries are very tart and are usually sweetened before they go into a salad. Dried cranberries add beautiful color and sweet chewiness to salads.


Grapes are harvested when sweet and ripe, so look for plump clusters that are firmly attached to green stems. Once at home, refrigerate grapes until ready to use and then rinse with cold water, halve them and mix them into your favorite salad.


Fall beets come in red, pink, orange, yellow and white varieties, as well as a range of sizes. Both the bulbous root and the leafy stalk are edible. For salads, select small to medium beets with firm, smooth skin and no soft spots or punctures. Those with stems and leaves still attached are best. The foliage should be green and fresh-looking. Store beets, greens and all, in a produce bag in the coldest part of your refrigerator for up to two weeks.

Tip: Use disposable latex gloves from the drugstore when peeling beets. They’re thin enough to allow dexterity while protecting your hands from stains.


Fennel is available in the fall and adds a hint of fresh sweet licorice flavor to any salad. This aromatic plant is pale green with a celery-like stem and feathery foliage. Its root base and stems can be treated like a vegetable and baked, braised or sliced and eaten raw in salads. The greenery can be used as a garnish or snipped like dill to enhance many recipes. Fennel’s licorice-like flavor is sweeter and more delicate than anise and, when cooked, becomes even milder and softer than in its raw state.


The cabbage family is wide and varied: broccoli and cauliflower are members. Some of the best heads of cabbage for salads are the crinkled-leaf “Savoy” types, also sold as Napa, January King or Wivoy cabbage. These are thin-leafed, tender and mild. When choosing a head of cabbage, look for fresh, crisp leaves that are firmly packed; the head should feel heavy for its size.

Cauliflower and Broccoli

These vegetables are available year-round, but they are especially plentiful in the spring and fall. When buying cauliflower, select one that is white or creamy white in color, firm and heavy. Cauliflower may be stored for up to one week in a plastic bag in the refrigerator. Keep it dry and any brownish colored portions may be trimmed away before cooking.

When shopping for broccoli, look for leaves and stems with dark green heads. Look for tender, young stalks that are firm with compact buds in the head. Yellow flowers in the buds or very rough bumpy heads may indicate the broccoli is past its prime.


Fall Spinach Salad

Serves 1



  • 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • Salt and ground black pepper to taste


  • 1 cup baby spinach leaves
  • 1 tablespoon dried cranberries
  • 1 tablespoon chopped  pecans
  • 1/2 of an apple, cored and diced
  • 1 tablespoon diced red onion
  • 2 tablespoons grated carrot
  • 1/4 of an avocado, peeled and diced
  • 1-2 tablespoons balsamic salad dressing, or to taste


Stir the balsamic vinegar and honey together in a bowl; slowly stream the olive oil into the mixture while whisking continuously. Season with salt and pepper.

Place spinach, cranberries, pecans, apple, onion, carrot and avocado into a salad bowl. Drizzle with balsamic vinaigrette and toss to coat. Serve immediately.


Wild Rice, Kiwi and Grape Salad

4 servings


  • 2 1/2 cups chicken stock
  • 1 cup wild rice
  • 3 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons honey
  • 2 kiwis, peeled and diced
  • 1 cup seedless red grapes, halved
  • 1/4 cup toasted pecans


Place broth in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Add rice, reduce heat to low and simmer, covered, for 45 minutes, or until tender. Drain excess liquid, cover and let cool.

Whisk together lemon juice, oil and honey in a small bowl until the honey is dissolved. Season with salt and pepper.

Place cooled rice in a salad bowl, along with kiwi, grapes and pecans. Add dressing, gently toss and serve.


Cabbage Salad – Waldorf Style

4 servings


  • 1/4 head savoy cabbage
  • 4 unpeeled apples, cored and diced
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped walnuts
  • 6 stalks celery, diced
  • 1/3 cup reduced fat mayonnaise
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt


Slice cabbage into thin pieces 1 to 2 inches long. Do not use the large ribs of the cabbage, as they are too strongly flavored for this salad.

In a large serving bowl, toss together the cabbage, apples, walnuts and celery.

In a small bowl whisk together the mayonnaise, honey and salt. Mix with the cabbage salad  until evenly coated. Serve immediately.


Beet, Fennel and Apple Salad

4 servings



  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon fresh orange juice
  • 1 tablespoon freshly grated orange zest
  • 1/2 teaspoon honey
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper


  • 1 medium cooked red beet, peeled and cut into matchsticks
  • 1/2 fennel bulb, trimmed, halved lengthwise, cored, and cut into matchsticks
  • 1/2 medium crisp tart apple such as Granny Smith, cored and cut into matchsticks
  • 1/2 cup firmly packed chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

For the dressing, in a small bowl, whisk together the oil, lemon juice, lemon zest, honey, salt and pepper.

In a medium bowl, toss together the beets, fennel, apple and parsley. Add the dressing and mix gently to coat all of the ingredients evenly. Serve immediately, or cover and refrigerate up to 8 hours. (If refrigerating, remove from the refrigerator and let stand 30 minutes before serving.


Fall Fruit & Nut Salad

6 servings


  • 3/4 cup cashew halves
  • 4 slices bacon, coarsely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh rosemary
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper


  • 3 tablespoons white wine vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • Salt and black pepper to taste


  • 1 (10 ounce) package mixed salad greens
  • 1 medium Bosc pear, thinly sliced
  • 1 cup halved seedless red grapes


In a large, dry skillet over medium-high heat, toast cashews until golden brown, about 5 minutes. Remove cashews to a dish to cool slightly.

Return skillet to medium-high heat, cook bacon strips until crisp on both sides, about 7 minutes. Remove bacon with a slotted spoon and drain on a paper towel. Coarsely chop bacon.

In a mixing bowl, stir together the bacon, rosemary, brown sugar, salt, cayenne pepper and toasted cashews.

In a small bowl, stir together white wine vinegar, mustard and honey. Slowly whisk in the olive oil and season with salt and pepper to taste.

In a large salad bowl, toss half the dressing with the greens, pear slices, grapes and sprinkle with nut/bacon mixture.

Serve with the remaining dressing in case anyone wants additional dressing on their salad.


Labor Day is the perfect time to host a season-ending cookout. Invite your friends and family to celebrate outdoors with this informal and relaxing Labor Day menu. Add some wine and beer and you are all set.



Lemon-Caper Dip

Serve this dip with your favorite cut up vegetables so your guests have something to nibble on while you grill the clams.


  • One 8 oz. container sour cream
  • 1/2 cup plain Greek yogurt
  • 2 tablespoons drained capers, chopped
  • 2 teaspoons chopped, fresh dill, plus more for garnish
  • 1 teaspoon lemon peel, finely chopped, plus more for garnish


Combine sour cream, yogurt, capers, fresh dill and lemon peel. Mix well and refrigerate until ready to use. Top with additional chopped dill and lemon zest before serving.


Grilled Clams

This will be the easiest appetizer you have ever made. Grilled Clams are best made with small littlenecks (about 1 1/2-inches wide)

6 servings


  • 4 pounds clams
  • 1/3 extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 small shallot, finely chopped
  • 1 large garlic clove, minced
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh chives
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh parsley
  • 2 teaspoons finely grated lemon zest
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Basil and parsley for garnish


To grill the clams:

Prepare grill for medium-high heat. Place clams directly on the grill grates. Grill (no need to turn or rotate) until they open, 3–5 minutes. Transfer clams to a large mixing bowl, discarding any that are not open.

To prepare the sauce:

Mix olive oil, shallot, garlic, chives and parsley in a small bowl.
 Add lemon zest and mix until well combined; season with salt and pepper.

Pour the sauce over the grilled clams in the mixing bowl and toss gently to coat. Transfer to a serving platter, arrange attractively and top with basil and parsley.

Main Course


Grilled Vegetable and Sausage Pizza

Makes 6 individual pizzas


  • 3 small yellow and/or green summer squash
  • 2 medium red onions
  • 2 medium tomatoes
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 6 small (6-inch) rounds of your favorite pizza dough (or use the recipe below that must be prepared a day in advance)
  • 1 pound Italian sausage, casing removed, cooked and drained
  • 2 cups grated Pecorino Romano cheese
  • 1 tablespoon each fresh parsley, thyme and rosemary


Cut squash into diagonal slices. Cut onions and tomatoes into thick slices. Brush with olive oil.

Heat grill to medium-high.

Place vegetables on oiled grill grates over a medium-high heat (use a grill basket if you like); cook about 5 minutes, until vegetables are lightly browned and tender. Remove to a plate.

Place pizza stone on the grill. When hot, place dough rounds on the stone. Cook about 5 minutes, until the  bottoms are golden. Turn crusts over.

You may need to do this in batches, depending on the size of your grill. As the pizza rounds cook place them on a tray until it is time to put them back on the grill.

Distribute sausage evenly on top of each grilled crust. Top with grilled vegetables and cheese. Sprinkle fresh herbs on top.

Cover the grill. Cook 6 to 8 minutes, until the bottoms are browned and the toppings are thoroughly heated.

Pizza Dough for Grilling


  • 1 ¾ cups warm water
  • 1 ½ teaspoons active dry yeast
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil, plus more for coating dough
  • 1 ½ teaspoons salt
  • 5 cups bread flour (high-gluten flour)


Combine warm water, yeast and sugar in the bowl of an electric mixer. Stir to combine. Let stand until the mixture foams, about 5 minutes. (If you use instant yeast, you do not have to proof it. Just mix all the ingredients together)

Stir in 2 tablespoons olive oil, salt and flour. Mix, using the paddle attachment just until dough comes together, 1 to 2 minutes.

Remove bowl from the mixer, cover, and let stand 20 minutes.

Return bowl to mixer and knead dough, using a dough hook, until surface is smooth and it springs back when you poke it, about 5 minutes.  Dough will be very stiff.

Roll dough in a ball, put it in a clean bowl, and brush lightly with olive oil.  Cover and refrigerate overnight.

Remove dough from the refrigerator and let stand at room temperature at least 4 hours before you plan to use it.

Place dough on a board. Knead it just enough to punch the air out. Divide it into six pieces. Flatten each piece into a disk on a cutting board and cover with a cloth until you’re ready to use them.


Italian Greens with Prosciutto, Gorgonzola and Pepperoncini

6 servings


  • ¼ lb prosciutto (8 to 10 slices), cut into 1/8-inch strips
  • 4 cups bite-size pieces mixed salad greens
  • 1 cup bite-size pieces arugula
  • 1 small head radicchio, cut into thin strips (1 cup)
  • 1/3 cup of your favorite red wine vinaigrette
  • ½ cup crumbled Gorgonzola cheese (2 oz)
  • 6 pepperoncini peppers (bottled Italian pickled peppers), drained and cut into thick rings


In a 10-inch nonstick skillet, cook prosciutto over medium-high heat 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Reduce heat to medium. Cook 5 to 10 minutes longer, stirring frequently, until prosciutto becomes crisp. Drain on a paper towel.

In a large bowl, place salad greens, arugula, radicchio and vinaigrette; toss to coat. Sprinkle with prosciutto and cheese. Garnish with pepperoncini peppers.



Frozen Tortoni Cups


  • 3/4 cup crushed amaretti cookies, divided
  • 3 cups of your favorite ice cream
  • 3/4 cup heavy cream
  • 1 tablespoon powdered sugar
  • 6 tablespoons flaked coconut, toasted
  • 6 maraschino cherries


Beat the heavy cream with the powdered sugar until stiff peaks form.

Spoon 1 tablespoon crushed cookies into each of 6 custard dishes or large foil cupcake liners.

Spoon a 1/2 cup of ice cream into each cup, spreading to form an even layer.

Top each layer with 1 tablespoon of crushed cookies, then the whipped cream and some coconut.

Cover loosely with waxed paper and freeze 1 hour or until firm.

Let stand at room temperature 5 minutes before serving. Top each dish with a cherry.


Eating less meat and more grains, beans, fruits and vegetables means you’ll be consuming fewer calories and less saturated fat. People who eat less meat are healthier, less prone to cancer, especially colorectal cancer, and suffer from fewer heart problems. Another benefit is that you’ll save money. Meat costs more per pound than most foods and it can be challenging to serve healthy meals on a budget.

Committing to a 100% vegetarian diet isn’t necessary to achieve the health benefits that vegetarians enjoy. There aren’t specific guidelines to exactly how much meat to cut out to achieve these benefits, but cutting back even slightly is a positive change. A national health campaign known as “Meatless Monday” promotes cutting out meat one day each week, but you could try meatless lunches during the week for the same effect. Going meatless once a week may reduce your risk of chronic preventable diseases and it can also help reduce your carbon footprint and save precious resources like freshwater and fossil fuel.

How to make veggies taste good:

Go big when it comes to seasoning your veggie-friendly food. Fresh herbs are great but try something besides rosemary and thyme. Hearty roasted root vegetables are the perfect blank canvas for experiments using dried spices. A blend made with shallot, onion and garlic, adds lots of flavor to vegetables. Like things hot? Try Aleppo pepper, a spicy-sweet pepper. Don’t be shy with the sauces, either. Harissa is a spicy and aromatic chile paste that’s a widely used staple in North African and Middle Eastern cooking. Harissa added to yogurt brings the heat and then the yogurt calms it down. This sauce is delicious drizzled over roasted carrots. Or, use a herb-packed vinaigrette made from parsley, tahini, lemon and garlic. Choosing in-season produce at the peak of ripeness ensures that the color will be rich the taste will be fresh and flavorful.

Dinner One: Lentil Chili and Corn Muffins with Cheddar Cheese

veggie night1

Lentil Chili

Serves 8


  • 1 medium yellow onion, chopped
  • 1 large red bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 8 cups low-sodium vegetable broth
  • 5 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 4 teaspoons chili powder
  • 1 (16-ounce) package brown lentils (about 2 1/4 cups lentils)
  • 2 (15-ounce) cans diced tomatoes
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley


Heat oil in a large pot over medium-high heat. When hot, add onion and bell pepper; cook, stirring frequently, until vegetables begin to brown, about 6 minutes.

Stir in garlic and chili powder and cook 1 minute, stirring constantly. Add lentils, tomatoes and broth.

Bring to a boil, reduce heat to medium-low and simmer, partially covered, 30 minutes or until lentils are almost tender.

Uncover and cook 10 minutes longer. Stir in parsley, salt and pepper and serve.


Corn Muffins with Cheddar Cheese


  • 1 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 cups yellow cornmeal
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 1 large egg
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 1/2 cups grated aged cheddar cheese, divided
  • 1 cup fresh corn kernels


Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Butter 12 standard muffin cups or use cupcake liners.

Combine cornmeal, flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cayenne pepper in a bowl.

Whisk together buttermilk, egg and butter in a separate bowl.

Add buttermilk mixture to the cornmeal mixture and stir just until combined. Gently fold in 1 cup of cheese and the corn kernels.

Divide batter evenly among the muffin cups. Sprinkle tops with the remaining 1/2 cup cheese.

Bake 15 to 17 minutes, until golden and a wooden pick inserted into the center comes out clean. Remove muffins from the tins and cool at least 5 minutes before serving.

Dinner Two: Penne Pasta with Eggplant Sauce and Garden Salad


Penne Pasta with Eggplant Sauce

4-6 servings


  • 1 medium to large eggplant, trimmed and diced (about 4 cups)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 4 ounces sliced mushrooms
  • One 28 – ounce can Italian-style tomatoes, undrained
  • One 6 – ounce can Italian tomato paste
  • 1/4 cup dry red wine or beef or vegetable broth
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano, crushed
  • 1/2 cup pitted kalamata olives, sliced
  • 2 tablespoons snipped fresh parsley
  • ½ teaspoon salt, plus extra for seasoning
  • 1 teaspoon dried red chili flakes
  • 4 cups hot cooked penne pasta (about 8 oz. uncooked)
  • 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 2 tablespoons pine nuts, toasted
  • 1/2 cup packed basil leaves, roughly chopped


Peel eggplant and cut eggplant into 1-inch cubes.

Heat the oil a 12-inch skillet over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add the eggplant and a generous pinch of salt and allow to cook, shaking and tossing occasionally, until the eggplant is brown and softened, about 10 minutes. Transfer to a bowl with a slotted spoon, cover with foil, and set aside.

Add the onions and mushrooms. Cook, stirring frequently, until the onions are softened, about 3 minutes. Stir in the garlic, oregano, salt and red chili flakes.

Add the tomatoes and tomato paste and bring to a simmer. Once the tomatoes have softened, gently break them apart with a potato masher. Then add the wine and water and bring to a gentle simmer. Cook until the sauce has thickened, about 30 minutes.

Add the cooked pasta, parsley and eggplant, cover, and heat over medium until hot. Stir in basil and olives, season to taste with salt and pepper and garnish with pignoli and Parmesan cheese.


Garden Salad

4 servings


  • 1 cup torn romaine lettuce
  • 1 cup fresh spinach leaves
  • 3/4 cup torn curly endive
  • 3/4 cup baby arugula
  • 1 small red, green and/or yellow bell peppers, cut into thin strips
  • 1/2 red onion, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 cup red or yellow grape, pear or cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 1 small carrot or half of a large carrot, thinly shaved
  • 1 ounce cheddar cheese, finely shredded (1/4 cup)
  • 1/4 to 1/3 cup Homemade Salad Dressing (recipe below)


In a large bowl, combine romaine, spinach, curly endive, arugula, bell pepper strips, red onion, and cherry tomatoes. Top with carrot and cheddar cheese. Toss with the dressing and serve.

Homemade Salad Dressing


  • 1/4 cup low-sodium vegetable broth
  • 3 tablespoons vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/3 cup olive oil


In a blender, combine broth, vinegar, honey, paprika, garlic, Worcestershire sauce, black pepper and salt.

With the blender running, slowly add the olive oil through the hole in the lid and continue blending until mixture is emulsified.

Cover and chill for up to 1 week. Makes about 3/4 cup.

Dinner Three: Oven Baked Asparagus and Pepper Frittata; Sautéed Garlic Spinach and Braised Baby Potatoes


Oven Baked Asparagus and Pepper Frittata

6 servings


  • 1 lb asparagus, trimmed
  • Salt to taste
  • 1 red bell pepper, julienned
  • 1/2 cup onion, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 8 eggs, beaten
  • 2 tablespoons Italian parsley, chopped
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp freshly ground pepper
  • 4 oz feta cheese, crumbled (about 1 cup)
  • 1 tablespoon butter, softened


Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

Cut asparagus at an angle into two-inch pieces and blanch in boiling hot water to cover about two minutes. Drain and set aside.

Heat olive oil in an ovenproof skillet with a cover. Add bell peppers and cook until soft, but not browned, about 7 minutes. Stir in onion and  asparagus pieces; sauté for 1 minute. With a slotted spoon remove the vegetables to a large mixing bowl.

Whisk chopped parsley, salt and pepper with the beaten eggs. Stir in cheese and mix with the sautéed vegetables in the mixing bowl.

Coat the inside of the skillet with the softened butter. Pour the egg mixture into pan. Bake, covered, until the eggs are just firm, about 35 minutes. Remove cover; bake until top is lightly browned, about 10 minutes.

Divide into six wedges and serve.


Sautéed Garlic Spinach

Serves 4


  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 5 garlic cloves, thickly sliced lengthwise
  • 1 teaspoon crushed red chili pepper flakes
  • Kosher salt
  • Thick strips of zest from 1 lemon
  • 2 pounds spinach, cleaned, thick stems discarded
  • Freshly ground pepper


In a small saucepan, stir together the olive oil, garlic, chili pepper and 1 teaspoon of salt. Stir in the lemon zest. Bring the oil to a gentle simmer over low heat and cook until the garlic begins to brown slightly, about 15 minutes. Remove from the heat and let the oil infuse for 1 hour. Remove the lemon zest with tongs and discard.

In a large skillet a large heat the infused oil and add some of the spinach and cook over moderately high heat until wilted. Add the remaining spinach until it is all wilted..Season with additional salt, if needed and serve.


Braised Baby Potatoes

Serves 4


  • 16 small red or new potatoes, halved
  • 2 cups low-sodium chicken stock
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon lemon zest
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil leaves


Place the potatoes, chicken stock, olive oil, salt and black pepper in a medium saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat and simmer until the potatoes are tender, about 20 to 25 minutes.

Drain the potatoes and place in a serving bowl. (I save this broth for soup or cooking other vegetables at a later time.)

Add the lemon zest and basil. Toss well and serve

Dinner Four: Mediterranean Salad with Hummus and Pita


Easy Hummus


  • One 15-ounce can of no salt added chickpeas, drained, 1 tablespoon of the liquid reserved
  • 1 small garlic clove, smashed
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup tahini (sesame seed paste)
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil plus extra for top
  • Pinch of sweet smoked paprika
  • 1/2 teaspoon Kosher salt
  • Chopped parsley for garnish


In a food processor, combine the chickpeas with the liquid, garlic, lemon juice and tahini and puree to a chunky paste. Scrape down the side of the bowl. Add 2 tablespoons of olive oil and the paprika and puree until smooth. Season the hummus with salt and drizzle the top with olive oil and sprinkle with parsley. Serve with Pita bread.


Mediterranean Salad


4 servings

  • 1/2 cup bulgur (not quick-cooking)
  • 1/4 of a medium head green cabbage, cut into 1”-thick wedges, then very thinly sliced crosswise (about 2 cups)
  • 1/2 sweet onion (such as Vidalia), finely chopped
  • 2 cups assorted small tomatoes, halved, quartered if large
  • 3/4 cup coarsely chopped fresh mint
  • 3/4 cup finely chopped flat leafed parsley
  • 6 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon Aleppo pepper or 1/4 teaspoon crushed red chili pepper flakes
  • Kosher salt


Place bulgur in a large bowl and add 3/4 cups boiling water. Let soak until softened and water is absorbed, 40–45 minutes.

Mix bulgur, cabbage, onion, tomatoes, mint, oil, lemon juice and Aleppo pepper in a large bowl to combine; season to taste with salt.

Do Ahead: The salad (without oil and lemon juice) can be made 4 hours ahead. Toss with oil and lemon juice just before serving.

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