Healthy Italian Cooking at Home

Category Archives: Fruit

Thanksgiving-pies

They’re simple, they’re American and, come Thanksgiving, everybody saves room for them. The recipes below for apple, pumpkin and pecan pie have been a tradition in my family for many, many years. It would not be Thanksgiving without them. I share these recipes with you and you can make them even if you do not celebrate Thanksgiving in your country.

Pie Crust for Apple and Pecan Pies

You will need three pie crusts for the Apple and Pecan Pies. You can double the recipe below and freeze the extra crust for another day or make one double and half of a double for the apple and pecan pies. I use a different crust for the Pumpkin Pie because my recipe needs a larger, deeper crust.

Classic Double Pie Crust

Ingredients

  • 2 ½ cups unbleached all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons salt
  • 1/4 cup trans-free vegetable shortening, such as Spectrum
  • 10 tablespoons very cold unsalted butter
  • 10 tablespoons ice water

Directions

Whisk together the flour and salt. Add the shortening, working it in until the mixture is crumbly.

Cut the butter into small (about ½”) cubes. Add the butter to the flour mixture and work it in with your fingers, a pastry cutter or a mixer. Don’t be too thorough; the mixture should be very uneven, with big chunks of butter in among the smaller ones.

Add 4 tablespoons of water and toss to combine. Add enough additional water to make a chunky, fairly cohesive mixture. It should hold together when you gather it up and squeeze it in your hand.

Divide the dough in half and form each half into a disk. Smooth the disks and the edges with floured hands. Wrap in plastic and chill for 30 minutes, or even overnight.

When you’re ready to make the pie, remove the crust from the refrigerator, leaving it wrapped. Allow it to warm a bit until it’s softened enough to roll, but still feels cold to the touch.

Next, measure the bottom diameter and up the sides of your pie pan. For example, if your pan is 7 inches across the bottom and 1 ½ inches up each side, that’s a total of 10 inches. This means you should roll your bottom crust to a diameter between 11 and 12 inches, which gives you enough extra pastry for crimping the edges.

Place the crust on a floured work surface and roll it to the desired width.

Place the crust in the pan by folding in quarters and placing it in the pan. Unfold the pastry and center it in the pan.

For a single-crust pie:

Fold the edges of the crust under and gently squeeze them together. Crimp, as desired. It’s good to make a tall crimped edge for a single-crust pie that is fairly liquid, such as pumpkin or custard.

For a double-crust pie:

Leave the edges of the bottom crust as is (no crimping). Once you’ve added the pie filling, roll out the top crust to the outside diameter of your pan and place it on top of the filling. Trim the excess crust with a pair of scissors; then press the two edges together.

Crimp, as desired. A simple fork crimp is fast and easy. At this point, it helps to return the pie to the refrigerator for 20 to 30 minutes; this chills the fat, which ultimately increases the crust’s flakiness. Cut a hole in the center of the crust for steam to escape or slash the pie’s top surface several times. Brush with milk and sprinkle with coarse sugar, if desired.

pies
Pecan Pie

Single Crust, recipe above. Chill in the refrigerator while you make the filling.

For the filling

  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1/2 cup light corn syrup
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 2 cups chopped pecans

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350°F.

Whisk the first 5 ingredients in a medium bowl to blend. Mix in 3/4 cup pecans.

Pour into the prepared crust. Sprinkle with remaining 1 ¼ cups of pecans. Bake the pie until set, about 1 hour 15 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack; cool.

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Apple Pie

Double Crust, recipe above.

For the Filling

  • 6 cups thinly sliced peeled McIntosh apples (about 2 pounds)
  • 6 cups thinly sliced peeled Granny Smith apples (about 2 pounds)
  • 2/3 cup packed light brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • Pinch of ground allspice
  • Pinch of salt
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

Topping (optional)

  • 1 teaspoon milk
  • 1 tablespoon coarse sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Directions

To prepare filling:

Combine apples, brown sugar, lemon juice, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, flour and salt in a large bowl.

To assemble & bake the pie:

Position a rack in the lower third of the oven; preheat to 425°F.

Roll out half of the dough as directed in the recipe above and invert the dough into a 9 1/2-inch deep-dish pie pan. Pour the filling into the crust, mounding it higher in the center than on the sides of the pan.

Roll out the second crust and invert the dough onto the top of fruit. Tuck the top crust under the bottom crust, sealing the two together and making a rolled edge. Flute the edge with your fingers.

Combine the coarse sugar and the cinnamon in a small bowl. Brush the top crust with the milk and sprinkle with the cinnamon-sugar. Cut 6 steam vents in the top crust.

Bake the pie for 20 minutes; reduce the oven temperature to 375°F and continue baking until the crust is golden brown and the filling is bubbling, about 35 minutes more.

Let cool on a wire rack for about 1 1/2 hours before serving.

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Pumpkin Pie

Pie Crust Ingredients

This recipe makes enough for a single deep dish crust.

  • 1 1/2 cups (6 1/4 ounces) unbleached all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/3 cup (2 3/8 ounces) olive or vegetable oil
  • 3 to 4 tablespoons (1 1/2 to 2 ounces) water

Directions

You will need a 9 inch pie pan that’s at least 1 1/2 inches deep.

Whisk together the flour, salt, sugar and baking powder. This can be done right in the pie pan, if you like.

Whisk together the oil and water in a measuring cup; then pour over the dry ingredients.

Stir with a fork until the dough is evenly moistened. Pat the dough across the bottom of the pie pan and up the sides. A flat-bottomed measuring cup can help you make the bottom even.

Press the dough up the sides of the pan with your fingers and flute the top. Chill in the refrigerator while you make the filling.

Pumpkin Pie Filling Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon unbleached all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
  • Pinch black pepper
  • 3 large eggs, beaten
  • 2 cups fresh cooked pumpkin
  • 1 cup half & half

Directions

In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the sugars, flour, salt and spices.

In a large measuring cup, beat together the eggs, pumpkin and half & half. Whisk into the dry ingredients.

For best flavor, cover and refrigerate the filling overnight before baking.

Preheat the oven to 400°F.

When the oven is hot, place the pie pan with the chilled crust on a baking sheet to catch any drips. Pour the filling into the unbaked pie shell and place the baking sheet in the oven on the center rack.

Bake for 45 to 50 minutes, or until the filling is set 2 inches in from the edge. The center should still be wobbly. Remove the pie from the oven and cool on a rack; the center will finish cooking through as the pie sits.

Tips

  • This recipe makes enough filling to generously fill a 9 inch pan that’s at least 1 1/2 inches deep. If your pan isn’t quite that big, you can bake any leftover filling in custard cups; they will take 25 to 30 minutes to cook.
  • Pumpkin pie filling is basically a custard; the eggs in the filling will continue cooking as the heat from the edge of the pie moves toward the center, which is why it’s important to remove the pie from the oven before the center is completely set. Leaving it in the oven too long will cause the eggs to overcook, tightening the proteins and causing the pie to crack in the center.
  • Mixing the filling a day in advance (refrigerate until using) will improve the flavor of this pie by giving the spices’ flavors a chance to blend.

Have a Happy Thanksgiving Everyone.

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appetizer cover

What kinds of appetizers should you serve on Thanksgiving or before other holiday dinners? What kinds of appetizers you serve depends on how much you want to spend and what type of event you’re cooking for. Don’t think, however, that appetizers have to be fancy and unusual. It’s best to lean toward the practical side and serve appetizers that most people like.

For a formal or semi-formal party: Serve such items as chilled shrimp with a dipping sauce, oysters on the half shell, mini quiches, stuffed mushrooms, finger sandwiches, tartlets, baked brie with crackers and cocktail meatballs.
For home-style parties: Serve various chips and dips, meat and cheese trays, cracker trays, cocktail sausages, cheese balls, chicken nuggets and veggies.
Generally, serving appetizers is a good idea. Appetizers give guests something to do, while waiting for dinner.

This time of year, however, can turn into an eating frenzy. Cocktails, dips laden with fat, fried food and lots of sweet desserts can be the usual fare. Not exactly healthy. While you don’t necessarily have to eat like you are dieting, remember that you may be eating a lot more calories at these holiday parties than you really want or need. Thanksgiving dinner alone can be over indulgent. You, also, want appetizers that won’t ruin your guests appetites for the main event.

Appetizers are just that – a little something in anticipation of the main meal. They should not be the main meal, unless this is a cocktail party where dinner will not be served.

Some tips on creating healthy but good tasting appetizers:

Don’t overlook the power of a good vegetable tray, especially served alongside a low-fat dip with great flavor. Here is a tip for giving the vegetables good taste – boil the vegetables for one minute in abundant salted water, drain, chill in ice water, drain and dry the vegetables. Chill in the refrigerator.until serving time.

It’s easy to go overboard when it comes to pre-dinner cheeses. Serve lower fat cheeses like Swiss, fresh mozzarella or well aged Italian hard cheeses that can be eaten without crackers.

Wrap small pieces of cheese or fruit in pieces of prosciutto for a delicious appetizer.

Healthier fresh salsas and bean purées or hummus make for smart dips. Serve baked snacks instead of fried.

Popcorn is a healthy whole grain and can be dressed up with flavorful herbs and spices for a special-occasion treat.

For recipes that call for a cup of regular mayonnaise, blend 1/2 cup of light mayonnaise and 1/2 cup of fat-free sour cream or Greek yogurt. You’ll cut more than 1,000 calories and more than 130 grams of fat for every 1 cup.

Nuts are an excellent party snack, especially almonds or walnuts because they offer the best health benefits. They are a great protein source and the fat in them will help keep you fuller and not as tempted to binge.

Be mindful of what drinks you choose and be careful not to go overboard—especially during the appetizer course. Remember, too, that the size of the glass and serving makes a big difference. A serving of wine is 5 oz.

Here are some easy appetizers you may like to prepare for your future holiday gatherings.

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Artichoke Tapenade

Good on a vegetable tray.

Yield: 1 1/2 cups

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons capers, drained
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 10 large pitted green olives
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 (14-ounce) can artichoke hearts, drained or one package of frozen artichoke hearts, defrosted

Directions

Combine all ingredients in the bowl of a food processor. Pulse until smooth.

appetizer crab

Crab Stuffed Mushrooms

Ingredients

  • 16 small cremini mushrooms, stems removed
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • ½ teaspoon garlic powder
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 shallot, minced
  • 8 ounces lump crabmeat, picked over
  • 1/4 cup dry white wine
  • Finely grated zest and juice of 1 lemon
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped fresh parsley
  • Freshly ground pepper
  • 1/4 cup panko (Japanese breadcrumbs)
  • Lemon wedges, for serving

Directions

Prepare the mushrooms: Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Toss the mushrooms with 1 tablespoon olive oil, the garlic powder and season with salt. Arrange the mushrooms snugly in a baking dish and bake until tender, about 15 minutes.

Heat the remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil and the butter in a skillet over medium heat. Add the shallot and crab meat; cook until the shallot is soft, about 3 minutes. Stir in the wine and cook until slightly reduced, about 1 minute. Add the lemon zest, juice and parsley. Season with salt and pepper. Remove the skillet from the heat and push the crab mixture to one side of the skillet; let any excess juices collect on the opposite side.

Remove the mushrooms from the oven and preheat the broiler. Stuff the mushrooms with the crab mixture. Toss the panko with the juices in the skillet; sprinkle over the mushrooms. Broil until golden, about 2 minutes. Squeeze lemon wedges on top.

appetizertomatoes.jpg.rend.snigalleryslide

Chicken Salad Stuffed Cherry Tomatoes

Ingredients

  • 2 (8-ounce) boneless, skinless chicken breasts
  • Chicken broth
  • 16 cherry tomatoes
  • 2 Granny Smith apples
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice, to keep apples from turning brown
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 3 tablespoons light mayonnaise
  • 2 teaspoons chopped fresh parsley leaves
  • 16 very small leaves rosemary, for garnish

Directions

Poach chicken in enough chicken broth to just cover the breasts for about 8 minutes or until an instant-read thermometer in the thickest part of the meat registers 165°F. Set aside to cool.

Carefully cut off a thin slice of the top of the tomatoes (be careful not to remove too much) and scoop out seeds. (A 1/4 teaspoon measuring spoon works well for this procedure.)

Peel apples, remove core and chop fine and coat in lemon juice.

Finely chop cooled chicken, season with salt and pepper and cinnamon, stir in mayonnaise and chopped parsley, mixing well.

Spoon chicken salad into tomatoes and garnish with the rosemary leaves. Chill until serving time.

appetizerGrilledPrawn

Broiled Shrimp with Caper Sauce

This recipe is easily doubled.

Ingredients

Sauce

  • 1/2 cup nonfat plain Greek yogurt
  • 1/4 cup large capers, drained and finely chopped
  • 1 small shallot, finely minced
  • Kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper

Shrimp

  • 12 extra-large shrimp, about 1 pound, peeled, deveined, tail left on
  • 3 tablespoons good olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • ½ teaspoon dried oregano
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Directions

Preheat the broiler.

To make the sauce: In a small bowl, stir together the yogurt, capers, shallots and season with salt and pepper, to taste. Let stand to allow flavors to mingle.

To make the shrimp:  Mix shrimp with oil, lemon juice, garlic, oregano and season well with salt and pepper. Place shrimp on a broiler pan.

Broil the shrimp, turning once, until bright pink and just cooked through, 1 1/2 to 2 minutes per side. Serve with the sauce.

appetizer falafel

Baked Falafel

Ingredients

  • One 15- to 16-ounce can low salt chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • 1 small onion or 2 scallions (white and light green parts), roughly chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, smashed
  • 3 tablespoons roughly chopped flat-leaf parsley
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • Juice of 1 lemon, divided (3 tablespoons)
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Hummus, tzatziki or tahini sauce as a condiment

Directions
Preheat oven to 450°F and set racks in upper and lower thirds of oven. Grease or line 2 baking sheets with parchment or foil.

Combine the chickpeas, onion, garlic, parsley, spices, flour, baking powder, half of the lemon juice, 1 tablespoon olive oil and salt and pepper to taste in a food processor. Pulse until well combined but mixture is still relatively coarse. You do not want a puree.

Using your hands or a small cookie scoop, shape the mixture into about 24 balls (roughly 1½ inches in diameter) and arrange on the the prepared baking sheets. Flatten each slightly and brush the tops with the remaining olive oil.

Bake for 10 to 12 minutes, then turn patties (rotating the trays when you take them out) and bake for another 10-12 minutes or until brown. Serve with hummus or yogurt sauce..


salmon1

Salmon is one of the healthiest fish you can eat. It is high in Omega-3 fatty acids, which are great for the immune and circulatory systems. Salmon is also good for the heart and is low in calories and fat compared to other protein sources.

Salmon purchased at a grocery store or fish market should still have the skin on to maintain its freshness and moisture. Try to buy a whole salmon side or a fillet that is cut from the thickest part of the fish. Request a center cut piece of salmon. Purchase 6 oz. of salmon (170 grams) per person. Avoid salmon with a strong fishy odor. Look for moist, clean-cut fillets.

There are several different kinds of salmon.

  • King Salmon (Chinook) is known for its buttery flavor and texture. It is the largest salmon species and has the highest Omega-3 and oil concentrations of any salmon. It is generally the most expensive salmon you can buy.
  • Sockeye Salmon or Red Salmon is more abundant than King Salmon. It has a bright red-orange color and a very rich flavor. It has a high fat and Omega-3 content. Sockeye is the most common salmon you will find in your local grocery store.
  • Coho Salmon usually appears in grocery stores around August and September. It has a milder flavor that King and Sockeye salmon and is sometimes referred to as silver salmon.
  • Chum Salmon is most often used for canned salmon. It varies greatly in quality and is generally lower in oil than other types of salmon.
  • Pink Humpback Salmon is the most abundant salmon of the species. This salmon is generally canned or smoked. It has a mild flavor and lighter colored flesh.

Salmon fillets adapt well to all cooking methods: baking, broiling, grilling, pan-searing or poaching. Adding a marinade is a common way to infuse the fish with extra flavor. Whether you’re a novice in the kitchen or an experienced cook, there’s no reason to fear salmon. Use the marinade and then choose one of the cooking methods below.

All purpose marinade for salmon:

4 salmon fillets, 6-oz (170 g) each
1/2 teaspoon (2.5 ml) garlic salt
3 tablespoons (45 ml) lemon juice
2 tablespoons (30 ml) olive oil

Combine the garlic salt, lemon juice and olive oil. Whisk the three ingredients together in a small bowl and transfer to a 1-gallon (4-liter) resealable plastic bag.

You can also use a glass dish covered with plastic wrap instead of the bag.

Place the salmon in the marinade and seal the bag. Turn the bag several times to coat all sides of the salmon. If using a glass dish, turn the fillets in the marinade several times to coat all sides, then cover the dish.

Place the bag with the marinade and salmon fillets in the refrigerator for 30 minutes.

Salmon, like all fish, is not as dense as red meat and poultry. As a result, it does not need to be marinated for long in order to absorb flavor. Remove the salmon from the refrigerator at least 10 minutes prior to cooking. Doing so raises the temperature, allowing it to cook more evenly throughout.

bakedSalmonFilet

Baking

Preheat the oven to 400℉ (200℃) Prepare a baking sheet with shallow sides by covering it with nonstick aluminum foil and coat the foil with nonstick cooking spray.

Transfer the salmon to the prepared baking sheet. If the salmon fillets have skin on them, lay them skin-side down on the sheet. Position the fillets in a single layer, spaced evenly.

Place the baking sheet on the middle rack in the oven and bake for 15 minutes..

When done, you should be able to easily flake the salmon apart with a fork. The middle should also be opaque

broil-salmon

Broiling

Allow the broiler to heat up for 5 to 10 minutes.

Many broilers only have an “on” setting, but if yours has a separate “high” and “low” setting, set the broiler to high.

Coat the rack with nonstick cooking spray before putting the salmon on it. Using cooking spray can drastically reduce the amount of salmon that gets stuck to the broiler pan rack. You can also cover the broiler rack with foil and poke a few holes in it to make clean up easier.

Transfer the fillets to a broiler pan. Place the fillets on the interior rack inside the pan with the skin-side facing down. Arrange the fillets in a single layer and space them apart evenly.

Place the broiler pan 5 1/2 inches (14 cm) away from the top heating element and cook the salmon for 10-12 minutes.The salmon is done when you can flake the fillets with a fork. The center should be opaque.

You can turn the salmon once during cooking to ensure even browning, but it is not necessary. Turning salmon fillets over can be difficult and may cause the salmon to fall apart.

grilled salmon

Grilling

Preheat the grill. You can use both gas and charcoal grills to prepare salmon fillets.

If using a gas grill, preheat the grill to 450 degrees Fahrenheit (232 degrees Celsius).

If using a charcoal grill, spread a layer of charcoal on the bottom of the grill and light. Allow the coals to burn to a gray color, about 30 minutes.

Place each fillet in the center of a piece of aluminum foil. (You can add herbs, seasoning and lemon slices if you like.) Bring the sides up and fold them together, sealing the packet. Press any raised aluminum foil flat.

Transfer the packets to the grill and cook for 14 to 16 minutes. Turn the packets over once, at the 7 or 8 minute mark, using grill tongs or a heatproof spatula.

Checking the fillets for doneness may be difficult since the foil will be hot to the touch. You may need to wait until after you pull the fish from the grill. If the fillets do not flake easily with a fork or if the center is not opaque, seal the foil again and return to the grill.

Allow the salmon to sit off the grill and in their foil packets at room temperature for 5 minutes, then serve.

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Pan-Searing

Preheat a skillet or saute pan over high heat. The pan should get hot, but it should not begin to smoke. Coat the pan with 1 tablespoon (15 ml) of olive oil.

Place the fish in the preheated pan. Cook for 4 minutes before turning each fillet over and cooking for an additional 4 minutes.

Use a fish spatula to turn the salmon. Do not use tongs, since the salmon will likely break apart if handled with tongs during the cooking process.

The salmon is done when you can flake the center apart with a fork and when the entire fillet is no longer translucent. After removing them from the heat, you should let the fillets rest at room temperature for 5 minutes before you serve them.

poaching salmon

Poaching

Place 1-2 inches of water in a saucepan with tall sides. Heat over medium heat until the water starts to gently simmer.

If desired, you can salt the water as it heats up. You can also add one chopped shallot or green onion and several sprigs of fresh dill, rosemary or other herbs.

Add the salmon fillets to the pan, skin-side down. Cover and cook for 5 to 10 minutes, depending on its thickness.

If the salmon flakes apart easily with a fork and is no longer translucent inside, it has finished cooking.

Remove the pan from the heat and let rest for 3 to 5 minutes. Remove the fillets with a slotted spatula to a serving platter.

Variations

Experiment with the marinade ingredients by using different combinations of oil, acid and seasoning. Acids usually include vinegars and citrus juices and seasonings can be dry or wet. For instance, you could create a marinade using soy sauce, rice vinegar, olive oil and brown sugar. You could also use a vinaigrette dressing, which already combines vinegar, oil and seasonings.

If baking or pan-searing the salmon fillets, you could coat the fish with a layer of fresh herbs, such as parsley, basil or dill and bread crumbs.

You can prepare a second, separate batch of the marinade and use it as a sauce or glaze. To use it as a glaze, coat grilled, pan-seared or broiled salmon halfway through the cooking process with the mixture using a pastry brush. To use it as a sauce, thicken it on the stove top by cooking the marinade over medium-high heat until it reduces. Pour over the cooked fish.

Here are some of my favorite ways to prepare salmon.

salmon and pasta

Linguine With Roasted Salmon and Lemon

This is a great recipe to make when you have leftover salmon. In fact, cook extra the first night you serve salmon and save some for this recipe.

Ingredients

  • 1 lb linguine pasta
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 cup chopped red onion
  • 5 medium garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • 1/2 cup reduced-sodium chicken broth
  • 1/2 cup green olives, pitted and sliced
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons capers, drained
  • 1 teaspoon lemon zest, finely grated
  • 1 1/2 cups cubed, cooked salmon (see recipes above)
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh basil leaf

Directions

Cook linguine to the al dente stage.

While the linguine is cooking, heat the oil in a large skillet over medium high heat.

Add onion and garlic and cook 3 minutes, or until soft. Add the thyme and cook about 1 minute. Add wine and cook 1 minute. Add the chicken broth, olives, lemon juice, capers and lemon zest and bring to a simmer and cook for about 5 minutes.

When the linguine is cooked, drain and add it to the pan with the olive-caper mixture. Add the salmon and toss to mix well.

Cook 1 minute just to heat through. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Remove from the heat and stir in basil.

parmesan salmon

Parmesan Crusted Salmon

Ingredients

  • 1/2 teaspoon seasoned salt
  • 1 tablespoon flour
  • Large zip-top bag
  • 1 1/2 lbs salmon fillets (skin removed)
  • 2 tablespoons light mayonnaise, divided
  • 1/2 cup shredded Parmesan cheese, divided

Directions

Combine seasoned salt and flour in zip-top bag. Cut salmon into 4 portions. Place in the bag; seal tightly and shake to coat.

Preheat a large sauté pan on medium 2-3 minutes. Place fish on a cutting board; spread 1 tablespoon of the mayonnaise over all 4 portions, to coat. Sprinkle 1/4 cup of the cheese over the mayonnaise and press lightly until cheese sticks.

Place salmon in the saute pan with the cheese side down. Lightly coat fish with remaining 1 tablespoon mayonnaise and 1/4 cup cheese, pressing lightly until cheese sticks.

Cover and cook 5-6 minutes on each side or until internal temperature reaches 145°F (or fish is opaque and separates easily with a fork).

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Sweet and Spicy Salmon Kabobs

Ingredients

  • 12 (10-inch) metal or bamboo skewers
  • 2 tablespoons packed dark brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 1 teaspoon hot paprika
  • Salt and Pepper
  • 2 1/4 pounds skinless salmon fillet, cut into 1 1/2-inch chunks
  • 2 medium (8-ounce) zucchini, cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices

Directions

If using bamboo skewers, soak skewers in hot water at least 30 minutes.

Prepare outdoor grill for direct grilling on medium heat and oil grates.

In large bowl, combine sugar, paprika, 3/4 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper. Rub mixture between fingers to break up any lumps of sugar.

Add salmon and zucchini and toss to evenly coat with spice mixture.

Thread zucchini slices 2 at a time, alternating with salmon, onto the skewers. Place on hot grill grate and cook 9 to 11 minutes or until salmon turns opaque throughout, turning occasionally.

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Salmon BLT

Makes 4 sandwiches

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup mayonnaise
  • 2 teaspoons chopped fresh dill
  • 1 teaspoon grated fresh lemon peel
  • 4 pieces (1-inch thick, about 6 ounces each) salmon fillet with the skin
  • Salt and coarsely ground black pepper
  • 8 slices (1⁄2-inch thick) country-style bread
  • 4 romaine lettuce leaves
  • 2 medium tomatoes, sliced
  • 6 slices fully cooked bacon, each broken in half

Directions

Lightly grease grill rack on an outdoor grill. Prepare outdoor grill for covered direct grilling over medium heat.

In a small bowl, stir mayonnaise, dill and lemon peel until mixed; set aside.

Sprinkle salmon with 1/4 teaspoon salt and 1/8 teaspoon pepper.

Place salmon, skin-side down, on hot grill rack and cook, covered, 10 to 12 minutes or until salmon is opaque throughout, without turning over.

Slide a  thin metal spatula between the salmon flesh and skin. Lift salmon from skin and transfer to plate; discard the skin.

Place bread on the grill rack and cook about 1 minute on each side or until lightly toasted.

Spread lemon-dill mayonnaise on 1 side of the toasted bread slices.

Place 1 lettuce leaf, folding to fit, on each of 4 bread slices.

Top each with 2 or 3 tomato slices, 1 salmon fillet, 3 pieces of bacon and another bread slice.


Roast-Chicken Cover

With its crispy skin and juicy meat, roasted chicken is one of the tastiest, most satisfying dishes you can make. If you’ve never roasted a chicken before, or if it’s been a while since you did, I’ll take you through the steps:

Here’s what you’ll need:

One whole chicken, about 4 to 5 pounds

A roasting pan with a rack

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Butter or olive oil for rubbing on and under the chicken skin

Carrots, celery and onion

2 cups of chicken stock or broth

1 tablespoon each of butter and flour for thickening the gravy

An instant-read thermometer for testing the temperature of the chicken

A mesh strainer, for straining the gravy

Optional: Garlic, fresh herbs and citrus fruits such as lemons or oranges

Kitchen twine for trussing

Roasting a chicken will take you about an hour and a half from start to finish, which also includes making gravy.

Basic Roast Chicken

Preheat your oven to 425°F.

Remove the neck and giblets from the chicken’s body cavity and pat the chicken dry, inside and out, with paper towels.

Rub the outside and inside of the chicken with butter or olive oil, then season with Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper — both inside and out.

Truss (tie the legs together) the chicken securely with cooking twine. This step is optional, but it will help your roasted chicken cook more evenly.

Thick slice half an onion and quarter one single celery stalk and one single medium carrot. Scatter these veggies in the bottom of a roasting pan. They will flavor the gravy that you will make later.

Set a roasting rack over the vegetables and place the chicken (breast-side-up) on the rack.

Transfer the roasting pan to the oven. After the chicken has roasted for an hour and 15 minutes, check the temperature with an instant-read thermometer inserted into the deepest part of the thigh. The thermometer should read at least 160°F. If not, continue roasting, and check again in 15 minutes.

When the chicken is done, remove the roasting pan from the oven, carefully lift out the rack with the roasted chicken on it and transfer the chicken to a clean cutting board. Let it rest there for 20 minutes, uncovered, while you make the gravy.

Place the roasting pan with the roasted vegetables on the stove top. Remove the large pieces of vegetables. Add a tablespoon of butter and heat over medium heat until the butter melts. Add a tablespoon of flour and stir to form a paste. Pour in the 2 cups of chicken stock or broth into the pan and stir to combine. Bring to a simmer over medium heat until reduced and thickened. Some cooks like to strain the gravy to remove any bits of vegetables but I like to leave them in there.

Season the gravy to taste with Kosher salt and black pepper. Once the gravy is finished and the chicken has rested, you can carve the chicken and serve it with the homemade gravy.

Flavoring Tips:

You can stuff the chicken with fresh herbs or other aromatic items. Thyme, rosemary, sage and marjoram are great choices, but any fresh herbs will do. For flavor and aroma add a couple of lemons or oranges cut into wedges and fennel fronds. Add a few peeled cloves of garlic to the carrot-celery-onion mixture before roasting.

Here are some additional ways to roast chicken.

How-to-Roast-a-Whole-Chicken-in-the-Crockpot-Step-3

How to Roast a Whole Chicken in the Crock Pot

Serves: 4-5

Ingredients

  • 1 (4 lb) whole chicken, insides removed and patted dry
  • 1/2 tablespoon of paprika
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose seasoning
  • 1/2 tablespoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt

Directions

Mix together paprika, all-purpose seasoning, garlic powder and salt.

Place 4 medium-sized foil balls in the bottom of a crock pot. This will act as a stand to prevent the chicken from drying out.

Rub seasoning over the entire chicken (including the inside). Place on top of the foil balls. Cover and cook on HIGH for 4 – 4½ hours, or LOW for 6½ – 8 hours.

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Roast Chicken with Maple Glaze

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds sweet potatoes (about 3), peeled and cut into 1 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1 medium onion, cut into 8 wedges
  • 1/3 cup cranberries (fresh or frozen)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons fresh-ground black pepper
  • 1 chicken (3 to 4 pounds)
  • 1 tablespoon butter, cut into small pieces
  • 6 tablespoons pure maple syrup
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme

Directions

Heat the oven to 425°.

In a large roasting pan, mix the sweet potatoes, onion and cranberries with 1 tablespoon of the oil, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/4 teaspoon of the pepper. Push them to the edges of the pan, leaving a space in the center for the chicken.

Rub the cavity of the chicken with 1/4 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of the pepper. Twist the wings behind the back and tie the legs together. Put the chicken, breast-side up, in the center of the roasting pan. Coat the chicken with the remaining tablespoon oil, sprinkle with the remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt and 1/8 teaspoon of the pepper, and dot with the butter. Roast the chicken for 30 minutes.

In a small bowl, combine the maple syrup, thyme and the remaining 3/4 teaspoon pepper. Remove the roasting pan from the oven and stir the potatoes. Brush the chicken with about 2 tablespoons of the glaze and drizzle the potatoes with about 1/2 tablespoon of the glaze.

Return the pan to the oven and cook, stirring the potatoes and brushing the chicken with the remaining glaze 2 more times, until the chicken and potatoes are just done, about 30 minutes longer. Transfer the chicken and vegetables to a serving plate and keep in a warm spot for about 10 minutes.

Skim off the fat from the roasting pan. Pour the pan juices over the chicken and the sweet potatoes.

salsaverde chicken

Roasted Chicken with Spicy Salsa Verde

4 servings

Ingredients

  • One 4-to 5-pound chicken
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 lemon, thinly sliced and seeded
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 1 small onion, peeled
  • 1 small bunch fresh thyme
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil

Salsa Verde:

  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 cup thinly sliced fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 2 tablespoons salt-packed capers, rinsed and chopped
  • 2 tablespoons thinly sliced fresh mint
  • 1/4 -1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • 2 salt-packed anchovy fillets, rinsed and minced
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • Grated zest and juice of 1 lemon
  • 1 hot pepper, seeded and minced (about 1 tablespoon)
  • 1 shallot, minced
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Directions

Make the salsa verde:

Combine the extra-virgin olive oil, parsley, capers, mint, red pepper flakes, anchovies, garlic, lemon zest and juice, hot pepper and shallots in a bowl and stir to combine. Add salt and pepper to taste. Allow the flavors to meld for at least 15 minutes before serving; if planning to serve after more than an hour, add the lemon juice at the last minute to keep the color vibrant. Yield: 1 1/2 cups.

Remove the chicken from the refrigerator 1 hour before cooking.

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.

Lift the chicken skin up and wedge 3 lemon slices and 1 bay leaf between the skin and each breast. Put the garlic, onion, thyme and remaining lemon slices in the cavity of the chicken. Rub the entire chicken liberally with olive oil.

Put the chicken in an ovenproof saute pan or roasting pan breast-side up, slide it into the oven and roast until the thigh reaches 160 degrees F, or until the cavity juices run clear, about 1 hour. Remove from the oven and let rest for 10 to 20 minutes.

Cut the chicken into 8 pieces and drizzle with the Salsa Verde.

lemon chicken

Roast Chicken with Lemon Shallot Sauce

Ingredients

  • 1 4- to 5-lb. chicken
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt
  • 2 medium lemons
  • 2 1/2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons dried thyme
  • 1 pound shallots
  • 1/2 to 3/4 cup reduced-sodium or homemade chicken broth
  • 1/3 cup dry white wine

Directions

Pat the chicken dry with paper towels. Loosen skin of breast and thighs and work some salt under the skin. Rub remaining salt all over chicken and in the cavity. Chill, uncovered, at least 3 hours and up to overnight.

Preheat oven to 375°. Zest lemons. Slice 1 lemon; juice half of the other.

Pat chicken dry, inside and out. Rub zest under as much of the skin as possible and rub any remaining zest inside the cavity. Rub chicken all over with 1 tablespoon olive oil and the thyme. Put lemon slices in the cavity.

Set a V-shaped rack in a heavy roasting pan large enough to hold shallots. Put chicken in the rack, breast side up. Add shallots to the pan and drizzle with remaining 1 1/2 tablespoons olive oil, turning them to coat.

Roast chicken until chicken leg moves easily and skin is brown and crisp, 1 1/2 to 1 3/4 hours (remove shallots after 1 hour and set aside). Tip chicken so juices from cavity pour into roasting pan. Transfer chicken to a carving board and let rest, covered with foil.

To make the sauce: Pour pan drippings into a measuring cup with a pouring lip. Trim tops from shallots and squeeze soft insides into a blender. Pour off all but about 1 tablespoon fat from pan drippings and add drippings to the blender. Add 1/2 cup broth and the wine and pulse until smooth.

Pour sauce back into the roasting pan. Cook, scraping up brown bits and adding more broth if you want a thinner sauce, over medium-high heat on your biggest burner (or straddling 2 burners) until sauce turns a nutty brown, about 10 minutes. Stir in the reserved lemon juice. Carve chicken, discarding lemon slices and serve with the sauce.

Roast Chicken with Butternut Squash

Roast Chicken with Pumpkin

4 servings

Ingredients

  • 1 chicken (3 to 3 1/2 pounds), quartered
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon fresh-ground black pepper
  • 1 small sugar pumpkin or butternut squash (about 2 1/4 pounds), peeled and cut into 1-inch slices
  • 1 teaspoon dried sage
  • 3 tablespoons water

Directions

Heat the oven to 450°.

Coat the chicken quarters with 1 tablespoon of the oil, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/4 teaspoon of the pepper. Arrange the chicken quarters, skin-side up, in a large roasting pan.

Mix the pumpkin cubes with the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil, 1/4 teaspoon of salt, 1/4 teaspoon of pepper and the sage.  Add the pumpkin to the roasting pan.

Bake, stirring the pumpkin occasionally, until the chicken breasts are just done, about 20 minutes. Remove the pan from the oven and remove the breasts from the pan. Tilt the roasting pan and spoon off most of the fat from the pan.

Return the pan to the oven. Continue cooking until the chicken legs and the pumpkin are done, about 10 minutes longer. Remove the chicken and pumpkin from the pan.

Pour off the fat from the roasting pan. Set the pan over moderate heat and add the water. Bring to a boil, scraping the bottom of the pan to dislodge any brown bits. Boil until reduced to approximately 2 tablespoons. Add any accumulated juices from the chicken. Spoon the sauce over the chicken and pumpkin.


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“Root vegetable” is a relatively generic description of vegetables, including starchy ones, that grow underground. To make matters more confusing, root vegetables aren’t always roots. Some are actually bulbs instead, like onions, garlic and shallots. Many people may differentiate onions and garlic as more of a spice than a vegetable, but they really should be grouped in the “root vegetable” category.

Potatoes are usually labeled as tubers and, again, most people think of them as more of a starch than a vegetable. Despite that, they are part of this category. Plenty of other vegetables fall into this group, as well, and include these well known vegetables: sweet potatoes, carrots, beets and leeks to name just a few.

However, here are a few that you may not know much about. These vegetables are in season in the fall.

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Celeriac, also known as celery root, has a delicate celery taste. You can grate it, saute it, use it in soups or eat it raw in a salad. It is filled with fiber, vitamin B, vitamin C and vitamin K.

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Jerusalem artichokes (sunchokes) are neither an artichoke, nor are they from Jerusalem. They are the tubers of sunflowers and probably derive their name from the Italian for sunflower, girasol. They have a crisp, nutty flavor, especially when sautéed. They can be roasted, pickled and they are excellent in soups. They also make a great substitution for potatoes.

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Parsnips resemble white carrots and are naturally sweet. They can be used in soups and stews and are particularly delicious roasted. Parsnips have more vitamins than their carrot cousin and they have lots of potassium.

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The rutabaga was originally a cross between a cabbage and a turnip. You can roast them, mash them or add them to soups.They contain a good portion of your daily vitamin C requirement.

turnip

Turnips are part of the mustard family, as are horseradish, radishes and rutabagas. They can be roasted, mashed or used in stews and soups.

So what can you make with these vegetables?

MEN-ON10-eis-roasted-veggies

Roasted Root Vegetables with Rosemary

Ingredients

  • Nonstick vegetable oil spray
  • 1 pound sweet potatoes or baking potatoes, peeled, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 pound celery root (celeriac), peeled, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 pound rutabagas, peeled, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 pound carrots, peeled, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 pound parsnips, peeled, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 2 onions, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 2 leeks (white and pale green parts only), cut into 1-inch-thick rounds
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary
  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • Salt and pepper
  • 10 garlic cloves, peeled
  • Chopped parsley for garnish

Directions

Position 1 rack in the bottom third of the oven and 1 rack in the center of the oven and preheat to 400°F.

Spray 2 heavy large baking sheets with nonstick spray. Combine all remaining ingredients except garlic and parsley in very large bowl; toss to coat. Season generously with salt and pepper.

Divide vegetable mixture between the prepared sheets. Place 1 sheet on each oven rack. Roast 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Reverse positions of baking sheets. Add 5 garlic cloves to each baking sheet.

Continue to roast until all the vegetables are tender and brown in spots, stirring and turning vegetables occasionally, about 45 minutes longer. (Can be prepared 4 hours ahead. Let stand on baking sheets at room temperature. Rewarm in 450°F oven until heated through, about 15 minutes.)

Transfer roasted vegetables to large serving bowl and garnish with chopped parsley.

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Sautéed Jerusalem Artichokes

4 to 6 servings

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons butter, divided
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 pound Jerusalem artichokes (sunchokes) scrubbed, peeled and cut crosswise into 1/4-inch-thick rounds
  • 3 tablespoons coarsely torn fresh sage leaves, divided
  • 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley

Directions

Melt 1 tablespoon butter with the olive oil in large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add Jerusalem artichokes and half of the sage. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Sauté until brown and just beginning to soften, turning frequently, about 10 minutes.

Using slotted spoon, transfer Jerusalem artichokes to a shallow serving bowl. Add remaining 2 tablespoons butter and sage to the skillet; cook until sage darkens and begins to crisp, about 30 seconds. Add lemon juice; simmer 1 minute. Pour lemon-sage butter over Jerusalem artichokes in the serving bowl, tossing to coat. Season with salt and pepper. Sprinkle with parsley.

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Rutabagas and Ginger Roasted Pears

8 to 10 servings

Ingredients

  • 3 pounds rutabagas, peeled, cut into 3/4- to 1-inch cubes
  • Nonstick vegetable oil spray
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon minced, peeled fresh ginger
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar or pure maple syrup
  • 4 firm Anjou pears (about 1 3/4 pounds), peeled, cored, cut into 3/4-inch cubes
  • 1/3 cup heavy (whipping) cream
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme
  • Coarse kosher salt, black pepper and nutmeg

Directions

Cook rutabagas in a pot of boiling salted water until tender, about 35 minutes.

Meanwhile, preheat oven to 400°F. Spray a large rimmed baking sheet with nonstick spray.

Combine oil, lemon juice, ginger and sugar in large bowl. Add pears; toss to coat. Spread on the prepared baking sheet. Roast until tender, turning pears every 10 minutes, for about 30 minutes total.

Drain rutabagas; return to the same pot. Mash into a coarse puree. Stir over medium heat until excess moisture evaporates, 5 minutes. Add cream, butter and thyme. Mix in pears and any juices from the baking sheet. Season with salt and pepper and grate nutmeg over the top.

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Honey Glazed Turnips

4 servings

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs small to medium (no more than 2-inches) turnips
  • 1 cup plus 3 tablespoons water or chicken broth, divided
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • Garnish: chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Directions

Peel turnips, then halve horizontally and quarter halves. Arrange turnips in one layer in a 12-inch heavy skillet and add water or broth. Add butter, honey and salt and bring to a boil over moderately high heat, covered, stirring occasionally. Uncover and cook stirring, until tender and liquid evaporates, about 5 minutes more.

Reduce heat and sauté until golden brown, about 5 minutes.

Add 3 tablespoons water or broth and stir to coat turnips with the glaze. Sprinkle with parsley and serve.

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Celery Root Salad With Shrimp

6 Servings

Ingredients

  • 1 celery root (or celeriac), about 1 lb
  • 1 (19-oz) can cannellini beans (rinsed and drained)
  • 3 oz baby arugula leaves (3 cups packed)
  • 2 tablespoons white balsamic vinegar
  • 4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt, divided
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper, divided
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons minced garlic
  • 1 1/2 lbs large peeled/deveined shrimp

Directions

Trim the rough skin from the celery root and peel.  Cut the celery root into very thin slices; stack slices and cut into thin lengthwise strips 1/8-inch-wide (about 2 cups).

Combine the sliced celery root, beans, arugula, balsamic vinegar, 2 tablespoons oil, lemon juice and 1/4 teaspoon each salt and pepper in a medium serving bowl.

Heat 2 tablespoons oil in a large nonstick skillet on medium-high heat and add garlic and shrimp; sprinkle with 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon pepper. Cook and stir 2-4 minutes or just until the shrimp begin to turn pink.

Add shrimp (and pan juices) to the salad; toss to blend and serve.


fall fruits

Most people think of summer as the time for the best produce, but autumn is the season that gives us great fruit for baking. First of all, fall is apple picking season, and that means lots of muffins, pies, cakes and tarts all filled with sweet and tart apples. Then Bartlett pears arrive, followed by Bosc and Comice pears and Anjou pears in winter. Other fall fruits would be figs and cranberries, which are healthy and delicious.

This time of year the whole world seems to go pumpkin-crazy. Pumpkin ends up in almost every recipe, whether it’s drinks, breakfast, pasta or pastries. Besides pumpkin, other winter squash such as butternut and acorn are available for sweet as well as savory recipes.

There are some spices that are associated with fall recipes. Those spices are warm, nutty, slightly spicy and slightly sweet. They include cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, cloves, pumpkin pie spice, chai, allspice, mace, star anise, cardamom, coriander, fennel and peppercorns.

Make your own Spice Blends

To make pumpkin pie spice blend, combine 1/4 cup ground cinnamon, 2 tablespoons ground ginger, 1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon ground nutmeg, 1 teaspoon ground allspice and 1 teaspoon ground cloves. Mix thoroughly. Keep the mixture in a tightly sealed jar in your pantry.

To make apple pie spice blend, combine 4 tablespoons ground cinnamon, 1 tablespoon ground allspice, 2 teaspoons nutmeg, 1 1/2 teaspoons ground ginger, 1/2 teaspoon cardamom and 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves. Mix all the spices together and store in an airtight container.

All these delicious, healthy fruits are in season now.

  • Apple
  • Bananas
  • Dried Fruit
  • Kiwi
  • Melon
  • Pear
  • Pineapple
  • Plum
  • Pomegranate

apple crisp

Apple and Cranberry Crisp

Ingredients

  • 8 cups thinly sliced, peeled baking apples (8 medium)
  • 1 ½ cups cranberries
  • 1/4 cup apple juice
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon apple pie spice or ground cinnamon

Topping

  • 1/2 cup quick-cooking rolled oats
  • 3 tablespoons packed brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon apple pie spice or ground cinnamon
  • 3 tablespoons butter

Directions

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

In a 2-quart rectangular baking dish combine apples, cranberries and apple juice.

In a small bowl stir together granulated sugar and 1 teaspoon apple pie spice. Sprinkle over fruit mixture; toss gently to coat.

For the topping:

In a medium bowl stir together oats, brown sugar, flour and 1/2 teaspoon apple pie spice. Using a pastry blender, cut in butter until mixture resembles coarse crumbs.

Sprinkle topping over fruit mixture.

Bake for 35 to 40 minutes or until apples are tender. Serve warm.

Bread Dough

Use this recipe for the fig rolls.

Ingredients

  • 1 ½ cups warm water (105 degrees F to 115 degrees F)
  • 1 teaspoon active dry yeast
  • 2  cups bread flour
  • 3/4 cups white whole wheat flour
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 ½ teaspoons salt

Directions

In a 2-quart mixing bowl stir together the warm water and yeast until yeast is dissolved. Stir in flours, sugar, oil, and salt until combined. Cover with lid or plastic wrap; let stand in a warm place for 1 hour. Stir down. Cover and chill overnight. Before baking, let dough stand, uncovered, at room temperature for 30 minutes.

fig rolls

Italian Fig Rolls

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup finely chopped dried figs
  • 1 teaspoon snipped fresh sage
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • 1 pound bread dough, recipe above and made the day before
  • 2 ounces Brie cheese, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1 egg white
  • 1 tablespoon water
  • Small fresh sage leaves

Directions

Line a 9x9x2-inch baking pan with foil. Grease foil; set aside.

For the filling:

In a small bowl combine figs, snipped sage and honey; set aside.

Cut dough into 12 equal portions. Shape dough portions into balls.

Working with one dough ball at a time, flatten it to a 3-inch circle. Top with a rounded teaspoon of the filling and a few pieces of the cheese. Fold dough over filling; pinch edges to seal.

Place rolls, seam side down, in the prepared baking pan. Cover and let rise until double in size (1 to 1-1/4 hours).

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

In a small bowl whisk together egg white and the water; brush lightly over rolls. Gently press small sage leaves onto the tops of the rolls; brush again with the egg white mixture.

Bake about 20 minutes or until golden. Cool in pan on a wire rack for 5 minutes. Serve warm.

fall desserts

Mini Cheesecakes with Pear Topping

Ingredients

Crust

  • 3/4 cup quick-cooking rolled oats
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped walnuts
  • 1/4 cup packed brown sugar
  • 3 tablespoons butter, melted

Filling

  • 1 8 ounce package cream cheese, softened
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 cup crumbled blue cheese (2 ounces)
  • 1/4 cup sour cream

Topping

  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1/2 cup packed brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons whipping cream
  • 4 cups sliced fresh pears (4 medium)
  • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla

Garnish

  • 1/4 cup broken walnuts,toasted
  • Crumbled blue cheese

Directions

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Line eight 2-1/2-inch muffin cups with foil or paper baking cups or lightly coat with nonstick cooking spray; set aside.

For the crust:

In a small bowl stir together oats, 1/4 cup chopped walnuts, 1/4 cup brown sugar and 3 tablespoons melted butter. Spoon about 2 rounded tablespoons of oat mixture into each prepared muffin cup. Using the bottom of a narrow glass, press down lightly. Bake about 8 minutes or until light brown. Cool slightly on a wire rack.

Reduce oven temperature to 325 degrees F.

For the filling:

In a medium bowl beat cream cheese with an electric mixer on medium speed until smooth. Add egg; beat just until combined. Stir in the 1/2 cup blue cheese and the sour cream.

Spoon 1 well-rounded tablespoon of filling into each muffin cup. Bake about 20 minutes or until slightly puffed and set. Cool about 30 minutes.

Remove from muffin cups. Place on a tray, cover, and chill for 2 to 24 hours. Let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes before serving.

For the pear topping:

In a large skillet melt the 2 tablespoons butter over medium heat. Add 1/2 cup brown sugar and the cream. Cook and stir until bubbly; add pears. Cook about 5 minutes or until pears are tender, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat; stir in vanilla. Cool slightly.

To serve:

Remove foil or paper liners from cheesecakes. Place cheesecakes in eight deep dessert dishes. Spoon pear mixture around cheesecakes. Sprinkle with the 1/4 cup toasted walnuts and additional blue cheese, if desired.

donuts

Baked Pumpkin Doughnuts

12 doughnuts

Doughnuts

  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
  • 1 1/2 cups pumpkin purée (canned pumpkin)
  • 2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 3/4 cups + 2 tablespoons Unbleached All-Purpose Flour

Coating

  • 3 tablespoons cinnamon-sugar
  • 1/2 cup confectioners sugar, optional
  • 2 tablespoons REAL maple syrup, optional

donut pan

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350°F.

Lightly grease two standard doughnut pans (see photo). If you don’t have doughnut pans, you can bake these in a standard muffin tin; they just won’t be doughnuts.

Beat together the oil, eggs, sugar, pumpkin, spices, salt and baking powder until smooth.

Add the flour, stirring just until smooth.

Fill the wells of the doughnut pans about 3/4 full; use a scant 1/4 cup of batter in each well.

If you’re making muffins, fill each cup about 3/4 full; the recipe makes about 15, so you’ll need to bake in two batches (unless you have two muffin pans).

Bake the doughnuts for 15 to 18 minutes, or until a cake tester inserted into the center of one comes out clean.

If you’re making muffins, they’ll need to bake for 23 to 25 minutes.

Remove the doughnuts from the oven, and after about 5 minutes, loosen their edges and transfer them to a rack to cool.

While the doughnuts are still warm (but no longer fragile), gently shake them in a bag with the cinnamon-sugar.

If you’ve made muffins, sprinkle their tops with the cinnamon-sugar.

Optional: combine the powdered sugar with the maple syrup and drizzle the cinnamon coated donuts with the glaze.

Cool completely, and store (not wrapped tight) at room temperature for several days.

french toast

Apple French Toast Bake

Make ahead breakfast.

French Toast

  • 1 day old Italian bread, about 18″ to 20″ long (12 ounces)
  • 8 large eggs
  • 3 cups milk
  • 1/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

Topping

  • 5 to 6 apples (1 3/4 to 2 pounds fresh apples), peeled and thinly sliced; such as Macoun, Empire, Cortland or Granny Smith
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 2 tablespoons real maple syrup
  • Pinch of salt
  • 2 tablespoons melted butter

Optional Garnish

  • Cinnamon-sugar
  • Maple syrup

Directions

Lightly butter a 9″ x 13″ baking pan or similar-sized casserole dish.

Slice the bread into 1 inch slices; you’ll need about 20 slices to fill the pan. Place the slices of bread into the pan. Be sure the entire bottom of the dish is covered with bread. You may have to cut some slices to fit.

In a medium-sized bowl beat the eggs, then whisk in the milk, sugar, vanilla, nutmeg and salt.

Pour this mixture over the bread and let it soak in while you prepare the topping.

Peel and slice the apples thinly. Mix them with the remaining topping ingredients and spread them over the bread in the pan.

To bake immediately, preheat the oven to 375°F.

To bake up to 48 hours later, cover the pan, and refrigerate.

Bake the French toast in a preheated 375°F oven for 30 to 40 minutes, until the apples are soft and the eggs set.

If it’s been refrigerated, remove the cover, and bake for 60 to 70 minutes.

Remove from the oven and sprinkle with cinnamon sugar or drizzle with maple syrup.

Makes about 10 servings.


gardens

In 1630 the Barbarigo family,  a powerful noble family from the Republic of Venice, owned most of the land in Valsanzibio. They took refuge in this location to escape the black plague outbreak that was spreading throughout Venice and the rest of Europe and that had already killed the wife of Zuane Francesco Barbarigo. Soon after, Zuane Francesco made a solemn vow that, if the rest of his family would be spared from this terrible disease, he would create a spiritual masterwork.

This vow was completed by his son, Gregorio and his grandsons. The garden plans were drawn by Luigi Bernini, a distinguished Vatican architect, and the sculptures were completed by Enrico Merengo (1628 – 1723), who was a well-known sculptor in Venice. The garden contains seventy statues all of which have engraved inscriptions. Symbolism abounds around every corner and down every path, as the gardens were designed to serve as an allegory of man’s progress towards perfection.

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Diane’s Pavilion or ‘Diane’s Doorway’ was the main entrance by water to the Barbarigo estate in the 17th and 18th century and was one of the first works in Bernini’s project. This impressive doorway represents one of the most important areas of the complex, in fact, it was not only the entrance to the Barbarigo estate, but it represented, as it does still today, the beginning of one’s salvation’s itinerary, desired by Gregorio Barbarigo in the plans. Just in front of the doorway, on its outside, on two solid pillars, are the  Barbarigo shields held up by two statues representing angels with a peaceful attitude. Thirteen other statues adorn the area.

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The sculptures depict a world of buildings, streams, waterfalls, fountains, small ponds, game and fish ponds and hundreds of different trees and plants all over an area of more than 10 hectares (over 24 acres).

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The labyrinth paths were created with six thousand boxwood plants, many of which are almost 400 years old, since they were planted between 1664-1669. The pruning work takes fifteen hundred hours of work, with the help of manual and mechanical cutters, ladders, levels and plumbed lines. The maze of labyrinths represent the complex voyage toward achieving human perfectibility. The paths are designed to disorient the visitor by the high boxwood walls, The right path to arrive at the exit is never the shorter one. Every promising shortcut considerably lengthens the walk or ends up in a dead-end. Symbolically teaching: whoever mends his way and finds the right path, will have to avoid repeating errors.

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This symbolic garden was awarded the first prize, as ‘the most beautiful garden in Italy’ in 2003 and as the third most beautiful garden in Europe in 2007.

The gardens are near Padua (Italian: Padova) Italy. The city is sometimes included with Venice and Treviso, in the Padua-Treviso-Venice Metropolitan Area, The city is the home of the University of Padua, almost 800 years old and famous, among other things, for having had Galileo Galilei among its lecturers. Padua is also the setting for most of the action in Shakespeare’s, The Taming of the Shrew.

Padua Hens

Paduan Hens

The culinary tradition of Padua has its roots in the simple produce of the vegetable garden, the farmyard and the vineyard. Farmland products are represented by the well-known Paduan hen. Paduan hens are an ancient breed (a favorite subject of 16th-century European painters) of small crested and bearded chickens from the surrounding province of Padova, in the Veneto region of north-eastern Italy, The Paduan hen is distinguished by the splendor of its plumage and elegant form. The crest is replaced by a tuft of long feathers on the head, which gives the appearance of a chrysanthemum flower in the male or of a hydrangea in the female.

DOC wines are produced in five areas and Extra Virgin Olive Oil comes exclusively from the area of the Euganean Hills. All varieties of chicory (a bitter green) are cultivated in the countryside of Padua. Prosciutto crudo dolce di Montagnana, a specialty of the area, has a festival designated in its honor on the third Sunday of May.

gardens01

Risotto with Porcini Mushrooms

Ingredients

  • One-ounce packet dried porcini (25 g, about a packed half cup)
  • 1/2 of a small onion, finely sliced
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil  
  • 1 1/2 cups (300 g) short-grained rice, for example Arborio or Vialone Nano
  • 1/3 cup dry white wine
  • The water the mushrooms were soaked in, strained and added to chicken broth to equal 4 cups
  • One bunch parsley, minced
  • 1 cup (50 g) grated Parmigiano
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

Steep the porcini in one cup of boiling water for fifteen minutes. Drain and reserve the mushroom water. Chop the mushrooms and set aside.

Strain the mushroom water and add chicken broth to equal 4 cups. Place in a saucepan and bring to a simmer.

Slice the onion finely and sauté it in oil in another large saucepan. Stir in the rice and cook for several minutes, until it becomes translucent, stirring constantly.

Add the wine and continue stirring until it has evaporated completely. Then stir in the first ladle of the chicken broth.

Add the mushrooms, 3/4 teaspoon salt and continue adding broth, a ladle at a time, stirring occasionally.

About five minutes before the rice is done, check seasoning and add more salt if needed.

As soon as the rice is al dente, turn off the heat, stir in the butter, a little ground pepper, the parsley and 1/2 cup Parmesan cheese.

Cover the risotto for two minutes. Serve with the remaining grated cheese.

gardens0

Hens with Garlic and Rosemary

Since Padua hens are not available everywhere, I offer an alternative.

Ingredients

  • 4 Cornish game hens, about 1 lb each
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 lemon, quartered
  • 4 sprigs fresh rosemary
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 24 cloves garlic
  • 1/3 cup white wine
  • 1/3 cup low-sodium chicken broth
  • 4 sprigs fresh rosemary, for garnish

Directions

Preheat oven to 450 degrees F (230 degrees C).

Rub hens with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil. Lightly season hens with salt and pepper. Place 1 lemon wedge and 1 sprig rosemary in the cavity of each hen. Place in a large, heavy roasting pan and arrange garlic cloves around hens. Roast in the preheated oven for 25 minutes.

Reduce the oven temperature to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). In a mixing bowl, whisk together wine, chicken broth and remaining 2 tablespoons of oil; pour over the hens. Continue roasting about 25 minutes longer or until hens are golden brown and juices run clear. Baste with the pan juices every 10 minutes.

Transfer hens to a platter, pouring any cavity juices into the roasting pan. Tent hens with aluminum foil to keep warm.

Transfer pan juices and garlic cloves to a medium saucepan and boil until liquids reduce to a sauce consistency, about 6 minutes. Cut hens in half lengthwise and arrange on plates. Spoon sauce and garlic around hens. Garnish with rosemary sprigs and serve.

gardens02

Limoncello Tiramisu

Ingredients

SYRUP:

  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 2 tablespoons limoncello
  • 3 packages (3 ounces each) ladyfingers, split

LEMON CURD: or 1 (10-12 ounce) Jar Lemon Curd

  • 1-1/2 cups sugar
  • 1/3 cup plus 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 1-1/2 cups cold water
  • 3 egg yolks, lightly beaten
  • 3 tablespoons butter, cubed
  • 1/2 cup lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons grated lemon peel, plus extra for garnish

FILLING:

  • 1-1/2 cups heavy whipping cream
  • 1/2  cup sugar
  • 1 carton (8 ounces) Mascarpone cheese

Directions

For the syrup: In a small saucepan, bring sugar and water to a boil. Cook and stir until sugar is dissolved. Remove from the heat. Stir in limoncello; set aside.

For lemon curd: in another saucepan, combine sugar and cornstarch. Stir in water until smooth. Bring to a boil; cook and stir for 1 minute or until thickened. Remove from the heat.

Stir a small amount of hot mixture into the beaten egg yolks; return all to the pan, stirring constantly. Return to the heat and bring to a gentle boil; cook and stir 2 minutes longer.

Remove from the heat. Stir in butter. Gently stir in lemon juice and peel. Cool to room temperature without stirring.

For the filling: In a large bowl, beat cream until it begins to thicken. Add sugar; beat until stiff peaks form. Fold cheese and whipped cream into lemon curd.

Arrange a third of the ladyfingers on the bottom of a 9-inch springform pan. Drizzle with a third of the syrup; spread with a third of the filling. Repeat layers twice.

Cover and refrigerate overnight.

Carefully run a knife around edge of the pan to loosen. Remove the sides of the pan. Garnish the top with lemon zest and mint, if desired. Yield: 16 servings.

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