Healthy Italian Cooking at Home

Category Archives: salmon


Some days are so busy that there doesn’t seem to be much time left at the end of the day to prepare dinner. If you keep the ingredients for some quick cooking recipes on hand, you will be able to put a healthy meal on the table without a lot of preparation or long cooking times. So much better for the family than fast food. Stock your pantry with quick cooking rice, couscous, thin spaghetti and orzo. Broths and canned tomatoes are very useful, as are dried seasonings. Keep packages of thin chicken cutlets, lean ground beef, salmon and pizza dough in the freezer and you have the ingredients for an easy meal.

Chicken Cutlets in Lemon Sauce


Serve with Zucchini and Quick Cooking Brown Rice. This is an easy meal for two and the recipe can easily be doubled.

2 servings


  • Two 6  ounce skinless, boneless chicken breasts, pounded thin
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1/2 lemon, juiced
  • 1 cup chicken broth
  • Salt and fresh pepper
  • 3 tablespoons fresh chopped parsley
  • 2 tablespoons butter, divided
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil


Season the chicken with salt and pepper. Place the flour in a bowl and the beaten in another bowl.

Heat the oil and one tablespoon of butter in a large non stick pan over medium heat.

Lightly flour chicken, then dip in the egg and add to the hot pan. Saute chicken 2-3 minutes on each side. When cooked, transfer onto a plate.

Place the chicken broth in the bowl with the remaining flour and whisk. Add to the pan along with the lemon juice, parsley and remaining butter and simmer on low heat for about 2 minutes so it reduces slightly and thickens. Turn off the heat. Return the chicken to the pan to combine with the sauce and serve.

Salmon & Broccoli 
with Herb Sauce


4 servings


  • Two 8-oz thick-cut boneless, skinless wild 
salmon fillets
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper, plus additional, to taste
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 cup clam broth or fish stock, divided
  • 1 leek, thinly sliced crosswise, white and pale green parts only
  • 1 head broccoli, cut into thin spears
  • Juice of 1 lemon, divided
  • 6 oz plain Greek yogurt
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh oregano
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh mint leaves
  • Sea salt, to taste


Preheat the oven to 350°F.

Pat salmon dry with paper towels and season with pepper. In a large ovenproof sauté pan with a cover, heat oil on medium-high. Add salmon and sear for 3 minutes per side, until lightly golden. Transfer salmon to a plate and keep warm.

Reduce the heat to medium and add 1/4 cup clam broth to the pan. Add leek and cook for 2 minutes, stirring, until liquid evaporates and leeks soften. Add remaining 3/4 cup broth and broccoli; 
mix well.

Return salmon to center of the pan, nestling the fish between leeks and broccoli. Drizzle half of the lemon juice over salmon; cover the pan and transfer to the oven. Cook for 12 to 14 minutes, until salmon and broccoli are tender. Remove pan from the oven and, using a slotted spoon, transfer salmon and vegetables to a platter; cover with foil to keep warm. Reserve 1/2 cup of the pan juices.

Prepare lemon-herb sauce:

In a small bowl, combine yogurt, tarragon, mint, remaining half of lemon juice and reserved 1/2 cup pan juices; mix well. (Add more lemon juice or pan juices as needed to reach desired consistency.) Season with salt and additional pepper.

To serve, cut the salmon fillets in half and plate each with lemon-herb sauce and leek-broccoli mixture.

with Italian Sausage & Spinach


4 servings


  • 2 links fresh Italian sausage (about 8 oz), casings removed
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 1/2 cups whole milk
  • 8 oz  thin spaghetti
  • 1/4 teaspoon red pepper (chili) flakes, 
or to taste
  • 6 oz spinach leaves 
(about 6 packed cups)
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon zest
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 1/2 oz Parmesan 
cheese, grated


Mist a large pot or saucepan with olive oil cooking spray and heat to medium-high. Add sausage and cook, stirring and crumbling with a spatula, until no longer pink, about 3 minutes. Transfer to a small bowl and set aside.

To the same pot, add 
2 cups water and the milk and bring to a boil on medium-high. (TIP: Watch carefully and stir from time to time, 
as milk has a tendency to boil over.)

Add spaghetti and pepper flakes. When the liquid returns to a boil, reduce heat to medium-low, cover and simmer, stirring frequently, until the spaghetti is just short of al dente, 11 to 14 minutes.

Stir in spinach and simmer, uncovered, until spinach is wilted, most of the liquid is absorbed and the spaghetti is al dente, 2 to 
4 minutes.

Add lemon zest, black pepper and sausage and stir until heated through, 30 seconds to 1 minute. Divide among plates and top evenly with cheese.

Beef Kebabs 
with Tahini Sauce


Serves 2


  • 1/4 cup plain Greek yogurt
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons tahini paste
  • Olive oil cooking spray
  • 8 oz  lean ground sirloin
  • 1 small clove garlic, minced
  • 2 tablespoons very finely minced white onion
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1/2 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper, divided
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt, divided
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt-free garlic and herb seasoning blend
  • 1/2 cup couscous
  • 1/4 cup packed chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 large Roma tomato, cut into 8 wedges


Two 12-inch skewers (If using wooden skewers, soak in warm water for at least 20 minutes 
before using.)

Line a baking sheet with foil and arrange an ovenproof 
wire rack over the top. Mist rack with cooking spray.

(NOTE: If you don’t have an ovenproof wire rack, simply bake your kebabs directly on a baking sheet.)

Prepare tahini sauce:

In a small bowl, stir yogurt, lemon juice and tahini until well combined. (If the tahini is hard or lumpy, microwave for 
20 to 30 seconds, or until smooth.)  Set aside while the kebabs cook.

Arrange an oven rack 5 to 6 inches from the top heat source and preheat the broiler to high. Line a baking sheet with foil and arrange an ovenproof 
wire rack over the top. Mist rack with cooking spray.

Prepare couscous:

In a small saucepan, bring 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons water to a boil. Stir in seasoning blend, remaining black pepper, salt and couscous. Cover and remove from the heat. Let sit, covered, for 5 to 7 minutes. 
Fluff with a fork and stir in parsley

Prepare kebabs:

Arrange an oven rack 5 to 6 inches from the top heat source and preheat the broiler to high.

In a large bowl combine sirloin, garlic, onion, cumin, coriander, ¼ teaspoon each black pepper, 
salt and cayenne. Stir gently until thoroughly combined.

Divide mixture into 4 equal portions. Shape each portion into a narrow, oblong 2- to 3-inch-long patty. Mold 2 patties around 
1 skewer about 1 inch apart (see photo). Repeat with remaining 2 patties and skewer.

Transfer to the prepared rack and broil until tops are lightly browned, 3 to 4 minutes. Turn and broil until 
lightly browned and cooked through, 3 to 4 more minutes.

Divide couscous between two serving plates and top each serving with 1 beef skewer. Serve with tahini sauce and tomato wedges, dividing evenly.

Quick Tomato Soup


8 servings


  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 stalk celery, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme
  • One 28-ounce can crushed Italian tomatoes
  • One 14-ounce can whole peeled tomatoes, with juice
  • 4 cups vegetable broth
  • 1/2 cup half-and-half
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste


Heat oil in a Dutch oven over medium heat and add onion and celery; cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 4 minutes. Add garlic and thyme cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 10 seconds.

Stir in canned tomatoes and broth; bring to a low boil over high heat. Reduce heat to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes.

Puree the soup in the pot using an immersion blender or in batches in a blender. (Use caution when pureeing hot liquids.)

Stir in half-and-half, salt and pepper. Serve with the wrap or a grilled cheese sandwich.

Spinach and Feta Cheese Wraps


2 wraps


  • 4 eggs
  • 2 teaspoons.prepared basil pesto
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1-1/2 cups chopped fresh baby spinach leaves
  • 1/2 cup crumbled Feta Cheese
  • 2 (2 oz.) whole-wheat flat breads
  • 1/2 cup jarred roasted red peppers, drained and thinly sliced


In a 10-inch skillet heat olive oil over medium heat. Beat eggs and pesto together with a fork in a medium bowl. Pour into the skillet. As eggs start to set, lift the edges with a spatula, allowing uncooked eggs to flow to the bottom of the skillet. Cook until the eggs are set but still moist. Sprinkle with feta; cover the pan and heat 1 minute longer. Cut omelet in half.

Immediately, place half of the omelet on one flat bread. Top with half the spinach leaves and half the roasted red peppers and roll up tightly. Wrap in parchment and let rest about 10 minutes so the vegetables can warm up. Repeat with the second flat bread and the remaining ingredients. Serve with a bowl of soup.


Whole grains generally are packed with nutrients and fiber, which aid in healthy digestion and weight management. These are the “good carbs” that help balance your diet and can fill you up.
Time-saving tip: cook extra grains and store portioned leftovers in the freezer — you’ll be ready when you need them for a recipe.

Farro And Chicken Chili


Farro is popular in Italy and, more recently, in North America and other European countries as well, for its roasted, nutty flavor and distinctive chewy texture. Farro’s tough husk makes it more difficult to process than other commercially produced grains, but that husk also helps protect the grain’s vital nutrients. With a higher fiber and protein content than common wheat, farro is also especially rich in magnesium and B vitamins. As a type of wheat, farro is unsuitable for those with celiac disease, gluten intolerance or a wheat sensitivity or allergy. As with all grains, pearled farro will take less time to cook.

6-8 servings


  • 1 cup semi-pearled farro
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 1/4 pounds skinless, boneless chicken breast halves
  • 2 cups water
  • 2 cups chopped onions (2 large)
  • 2 cups chopped zucchini (2 small)
  • 1 cup chopped carrots (2 medium)
  • 1 fresh jalapeno chili pepper, stemmed, seeded and finely chopped*
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons chili powder
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper
  • Two 14 1/2 – ounce cans reduced-sodium chicken broth
  • One 14 1/2 – ounce can no-salt-added diced tomatoes, undrained
  • One 6 ounce can tomato paste
  • 1 cup shredded cheddar cheese (4 ounces)


Rinse farro. In a medium saucepan bring 2 cups of water to boiling. Stir in farro. Return to boiling; reduce heat. Simmer, covered, for 20 to 25 minutes or until farro is tender. Drain off any excess water and discard.

In a large skillet bring 2 cups water to boiling. Add chicken breasts. Reduce heat. Simmer, covered, for 12 minutes or until no longer pink (165 degrees F). Using a slotted spoon, transfer chicken to a cutting board. Cool slightly. Coarsely dice the chicken. Set aside. Retain the chicken cooking water.

In a 4-quart Dutch oven cook onions, zucchini, carrots and chili pepper in hot oil about 5 minutes or until tender. Stir in chili powder, cumin, crushed red pepper, broth, tomatoes, tomato paste and the chicken cooking water. Bring to boiling; reduce heat. Simmer, covered for 20 minutes.

Stir in cooked farro and diced chicken. Cook and stir until heated through. Ladle chili into serving bowls. Top each serving with cheddar cheese.

Note* Chili peppers contain volatile oils that can burn your skin and eyes. When working with chili peppers, wear plastic or rubber gloves. If your bare hands do touch the peppers, wash your hands and nails well with soap and warm water.

Beef Steaks With Kasha Pilaf


Buckwheat Groats are soft white seeds with a mild flavor, but when toasted they develop a more intense flavor. Groats can be steam-cooked like rice for salads and side dishes or ground into fresh flour. Buckwheat flour makes delicious pancakes. Buckwheat groats are gluten-free seeds from a plant related to rhubarb. The outer husk is pulled away and the grain-like fruit is harvested and eaten. First cultivated in Southeast Asia thousands of years ago, kasha eventually took root in Eastern Europe, where it became a classic side dish. Buckwheat is very nutritious and provides a complete protein, including all the essential amino acids. Use buckwheat groats in any recipe that calls for whole grains. Be sure to purchase buckwheat groats that have been toasted.

4 servings


  • 2/3 cup buckwheat groats
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 1/2 cup chopped red onion (1 medium)
  • 2 large cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/4 cup dried cherries
  • 1/4 cup coarsely snipped fresh basil
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 pound beef tenderloin
  • 1/4 teaspoon steak seasoning
  • 1/3 cup sliced almonds, toasted


In a medium saucepan bring 1-1/2 cups water to boiling. Stir in buckwheat groats; reduce heat. Simmer, covered, for 5 to 7 minutes or until tender (you should have about 2 cups of cooked groats). Set aside.

In a large nonstick skillet heat 1 tablespoon of the oil over medium-high heat. Add onion and garlic; cook and stir for 2 to 3 minutes or just until the onion begins to soften.

Drain cooked groats, if necessary. Add onion mixture to the cooked groats. Stir in 1 tablespoon of olive oil, the cherries, basil, vinegar and salt.

Let stand at room temperature while you prepare the beef.

Cut beef crosswise into 1/2 inch thick slices. Evenly sprinkle beef pieces with the steak seasoning.  Add the remaining tablespoon of oil to the same skillet; heat over medium heat.

Cook beef pieces in hot oil about 4 minutes or until medium  (145 degrees F), turning once halfway through the cooking time.

Serve beef pieces over groats mixture. Sprinkle with toasted almonds.

Amaranth Biscuit Topped Stew


Amaranth is often popped like popcorn and mixed with honey, molasses or chocolate to make a popular treat in Mexico called “alegría” (meaning “joy”). Although amaranth derives its name from the Greek for “never-fading flower,” it is its highly nutritious seeds, not its vibrant red blooms, that are its most valuable asset. Like buckwheat and quinoa, amaranth is an especially high-quality source of plant protein including two essential amino acids, lysine and methionine. Amaranth is packed with iron and calcium and its fiber content is triple that of wheat. Amaranth is completely gluten-free and suitable for those with celiac disease. It is an especially digestible grain, making it a good choice for people recovering from illness.

8 servings


  • 1/2 cup whole grain amaranth
  • Nonstick olive oil cooking spray
  • 1 1/2 pounds lean pork shoulder, trimmed of fat and cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 teaspoon dried sage, crushed
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 8 ounces fresh mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 cup chopped onion (1 large)
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 cups cubed sweet potato
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup yellow cornmeal
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme, crushed
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup butter


Place amaranth in a small bowl. Stir in 1 cup boiling water. Cover and let stand for at least 1 hour.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Lightly coat a 3-quart rectangular baking dish with cooking spray.

Sprinkle pork with sage and toss to coat. In a large nonstick skillet brown pork in hot oil over medium-high heat. Transfer pork to the prepared baking dish.

Add mushrooms, onion and garlic to the same skillet. Cook and stir about 5 minutes or until the onion is tender. Stir in sweet potato cubes and 1 cup water. Bring to boiling.

In a small bowl stir together 1/4 cup cold water, the cornstarch and 1/4 teaspoon of the salt; stir into the mixture in the skillet. Cook and stir until mixture thickens.

Pour the mixture over the pork in the baking dish. (Sweet potatoes will not be done yet.) Bake for 30 minutes.

Remove the baking dish from the oven and increase the oven temperature to 450 degrees F.

For the biscuits:

In a large bowl combine flour, cornmeal, baking powder, thyme, black pepper and the remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt. Using a pastry blender, cut in butter until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs.

Add soaked amaranth and any liquid remaining in the bowl. Stir until combined.

Using a large spoon or ice cream scoop, drop about ¼ cup of the biscuit dough into eight mounds on top of the stew.

Return the baking dish to the oven and bake for 15 minutes or until the biscuits are browned and a toothpick inserted in the center of a biscuit comes out clean.

Quinoa Salmon Cakes


The quinoa plant is a relative of beets, spinach and Swiss chard, but we treat its seeds as we would a grain, preparing and eating them in much the same way. Available in light brown, red and even black varieties, quinoa is filling and has a mellow flavor. It is a good source of manganese, iron, copper, phosphorous, vitamin B2 and other essential minerals and has the highest protein content of any grain. It is especially high in lysine, an amino acid that is typically low in other grains. Quinoa’s protein is complete, containing all nine essential amino acids – a rarity in the plant kingdom. Quinoa is gluten-free and easy to digest.

While it’s best to rinse all grains before cooking, pre-washing is especially advisable for quinoa, in order to remove the bitter saponin coating on its outer hull that sometimes remains after processing. To do so, simply run cold water over quinoa in a fine-meshed strainer, rubbing the seeds with your fingers. (Avoid soaking quinoa, however, as saponins can leach into the seeds.)

After rinsing, combine 1 cup quinoa with 2 cups water in a medium saucepan. Bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat to low, and simmer until quinoa is tender, about 15 minutes, or until the grains become translucent and the germ appears as a thin white ring around each grain. This recipe will yield 3 cups of cooked quinoa.  Quinoa holds lots of water, so you have to make sure you drain it thoroughly after it’s cooked. Fluff with a fork.

6 servings


  • 2 cups cooked quinoa
  • 12 ounces cooked salmon or two 6 ounce pouches pink chunk salmon, drained
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped onion (1 medium)
  • 2 tablespoons snipped fresh chives
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 cup panko (Japanese-style bread crumbs)
  • 3/4 teaspoon lemon pepper seasoning
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 2 egg whites, lightly beaten
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • Nonstick olive oil cooking spray
  • 6 cups arugula

Lemon-Mustard Sauce

  • 1 lemon, cut into thin wedges
  • One 6  ounce carton plain Greek yogurt
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon-style mustard
  • 1 tablespoon snipped fresh chives
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
  • Dash freshly ground black pepper


Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

In a large bowl stir together cooked quinoa, salmon, onion, 2 tablespoons chives and the garlic.

In a medium bowl stir together panko and lemon pepper seasoning; then add milk, eggs, egg whites and oil, stirring until combined. Add the panko mixture to the salmon mixture; stir until well mixed.

Generously coat twelve 2-1/2-inch muffin cups with cooking spray. Divide salmon-panko mixture evenly among the prepared cups, using a heaping 1/3 cup in each cup.

Bake about 25 minutes or until tops are golden and an instant-read thermometer inserted in center of a cup registers 160 degrees F. Cool in muffin cups on a wire rack for 10 minutes.

Divide arugula among six serving plates. Run a knife around the edges of each cup to loosen; remove cakes from muffin the cups. Arrange on top of the arugula. Serve with lemon wedges and the lemon mustard sauce.

For the lemon-mustard sauce:

Stir together yogurt, mustard, 1 tablespoon chives, the lemon juice and black pepper. Serve sauce with warm salmon cups.

Barley-Stuffed Red Bell Peppers


A staple of soups and stews, barley is the oldest known domesticated grain and comes in hulled and pearled varieties. Hulled barley is the true whole-grain form, with only the outermost hull removed, whereas pearled barley is polished to remove the bran layer and often the inner endosperm layer as well. Pearled barley is both easier to find and the type called for in most recipes. Barley is an excellent source of fiber (one cup cooked contains 13 grams); its insoluble fiber helps maintain large populations of friendly bacteria in the digestive tract. Additionally, barley has been shown to aid in regulating blood sugar after meals (more so than other grains) for up to 10 hours, Like wheat and rye, barley is a gluten grain and is therefore unsuitable for those with celiac disease or gluten intolerance.

If you cannot find quick cooking barley then combine 1 cup pearled barley and 3 cups water in a pot and bring to a boil. Reduce heat, cover and simmer 45-60 minutes.

4 servings


  • 1 cup sliced fresh mushrooms
  • 1 cup vegetable or chicken broth
  • 2/3 cup quick-cooking barley
  • 2 large red bell peppers
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • 1 large tomato, peeled, seeded and chopped (about 3/4 cup)
  • 3/4 cup shredded mozzarella cheese (3 ounces)
  • 1/2 cup shredded zucchini
  • 1/4 cup finely diced onion
  • 1/3 cup soft bread crumbs
  • 1 tablespoon snipped fresh basil
  • 1 teaspoon snipped fresh rosemary
  • 1/4 teaspoon sea salt
  • Several dashes of bottled hot pepper sauce


Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

In a medium saucepan combine mushrooms, broth and barley. Bring to boiling; reduce heat. Simmer, covered, for 12 to 15 minutes or until barley is tender; drain and reserve the cooking liquid.

Halve sweet peppers lengthwise; remove seeds and membranes.

In a medium bowl combine egg, tomato, 1/2 cup of the cheese, onion,  zucchini, bread crumbs, basil, rosemary, onion salt and hot pepper sauce. Stir in cooked barley mixture.

Place peppers, cut sides up, in an ungreased 2-quart baking dish. Spoon barley mixture into peppers. Pour the barley cooking water around the peppers to cover the bottom of the baking dish. Cover the dish with foil.

Bake for 30 minutes or until barley mixture is heated through and the peppers are tender. Sprinkle each pepper with the remaining 1/4 cup cheese. Bake, uncovered, about 2 minutes more or until the cheese is melted.


Making  one dish meals can be a very economical way of preparing delicious and healthy meals. This type of dinner is especially desirable for busy people. It is really very easy and doesn’t take a great deal of time. The term one-pot meal is almost synonymous with crock-pot dinners, hearty stews and pot roasts coming to mind; however there are plenty of lighter and faster variations to this concept. A one dish meal need not require hours and hours of cooking, but may be as simple as a stir-fry or a summer pasta with vegetables and seafood.


Tortellini with Broccoli, Olives and Beans

2-3 servings


  • 9 ounces refrigerated or frozen cheese-filled tortellini
  • 2 cups small broccoli florets
  • One 15 ounce can cannellini (white kidney beans), rinsed and drained
  • 1/4 cup slivered pitted Kalamata olives
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons white balsamic vinegar
  • 1/2 teaspoon crushed red chili pepper
  • 1 cup quartered cherry or grape tomatoes
  • 1/2 cup crumbled feta cheese
  • 1/4 cup snipped fresh basil


In a deep large skillet bring 2 inches of water to boiling. Add tortellini; cook for 7 to 8 minutes or until tender, stirring occasionally. Stir in broccoli; cook for 2 minutes or until the broccoli is crisp-tender. Drain in colander. Return tortellini and broccoli to the skillet.

Stir in beans, olives, oil, vinegar and red pepper. Heat through. Sprinkle with tomatoes, feta and basil. Serve in pasta bowls.


Salmon and Swiss Chard in Mustard Sauce

4 servings


  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 1 ¼ pounds fresh skinless salmon fillets
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely minced
  • 2 tablespoons Dijon-style mustard
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon dried dill
  • 1/3 cup chopped onion (1 small)
  • 1/2 cup reduced-sodium chicken broth
  • 2 pounds Swiss chard, stems removed and the leaves cut into 1-inch pieces


Brush the oil over the bottom of a large deep skillet with a cover.

Rinse and pat the salmon dry with paper towels. Place salmon in the skillet, tucking under any thin edges. Sprinkle the salmon with the garlic.

In a small bowl stir together mustard, honey, vinegar and dill and transfer 2 tablespoons of the mixture to another small bowl to serve later.

Stir the onion, broth and mustard mixture together and pour over the salmon.

Cover and bring to a slow boil, reduce heat to medium and poach until the salmon flesh is firm, about 12 to 15 minutes.

Carefully transfer salmon with a slotted spoon to a serving platter.Add the chard to the skillet and cook until tender, about

Stir the reserved 2 tablespoons of mustard mixture into the chard mixture. Spoon the chard onto the platter with the salmon.


Turkey Cutlets with Barley Saute

6 servings


  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 6 –  1/2-inch-thick turkey breast slices (cutlets) (about 1 1/2 pounds)
  • 3 cups sliced fresh cremini mushrooms (8 ounces)
  • ½ cup chopped onion
  • ½ cup chopped carrot
  • ½ cup chopped red bell pepper
  • 2 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth
  • 1 cup quick-cooking barley
  • 2 teaspoons snipped fresh oregano or 1 teaspoon dried oregano, crushed
  • ½ teaspoon finely shredded lemon peel
  • Salt and ground black pepper
  • Snipped fresh oregano
  • Lemon wedges


In a large skillet with a cover, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Sprinkle turkey cutlets lightly with salt and pepper and place in the skillet. Cook for 4 to 6 minutes or until browned and no longer pink, turning once. Remove turkey from the skillet; set aside on a platter and cover with foil..

Add the mushrooms, onion, carrot and bell pepper to the skillet and stir for 3 to 4 minutes or until tender. Stir in broth, barley and oregano. Bring to boiling; reduce heat. Cover and simmer for 10 to 12 minutes or until barley is tender and liquid is nearly absorbed.

Stir in lemon peel and 1/4 teaspoon each of salt and black pepper. Return turkey cutlets with any accumulated juices to the skillet. Cover and cook for 1 to 3 minutes or until heated through. Adjust salt and pepper seasoning to taste. Garnish with additional fresh oregano and serve with lemon wedges.


Pork Tenderloin with Carrots, Parsnips and Chickpeas

6 servings


  • Two 1 pound pork tenderloins (455 g), trimmed of fat and silverskin
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 pound carrots, peeled and cut in half lengthwise
  • 1 pound parsnips, peeled and cut in half lengthwise
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • ½ cup drained canned chickpeas (85 g), rinsed and blotted dry
  • ½ cup fresh orange juice (120 ml)
  • ½ cup dry white wine or low sodium chicken broth (120 ml)
  • 1 tablespoon firmly packed light brown sugar
  • ½ teaspoon crushed fennel seeds
  • ¼ teaspoon pimenton ( smoked paprika)
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh oregano


Place rack in the center of the oven. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

Season pork generously on all sides with salt and pepper. In a 12-inch ovenproof skillet heat oil over medium-high heat. Add pork. Sear on all sides until browned, about 6 minutes total. Transfer the pork to a large plate; set aside

Add carrots to the pan. Cook and stir until browned at the edges, about 5 minutes. Add the chickpeas and 1/2 teaspoon salt. Cook for 1 minute more. Using a spatula, make two wide spaces through the vegetables. Place pork tenderloins in the spaces so they rest directly on the pan surrounded by the carrots and chickpeas.

Transfer the pan to the oven. Roast 10 to 15 minutes or until an instant read thermometer inserted into the center of a tenderloin registers 145 degrees F. The center should be rosy when cut into with a knife. Transfer the pork to a carving board; tent loosely with aluminum foil. Let rest for 10 minutes.

Carefully place the pan with the vegetables over medium heat on top of the stove. Add orange juice, wine or broth, brown sugar, fennel and paprika; mix well. Bring to a simmer and cook, stirring occasionally, until the sauce is reduced by half, about 3 minutes. Stir in butter, parsley and oregano. Season to taste with salt.

To serve, cut the pork on a slight diagonal into slices 1-inch-thick. Serve with roasted vegetables.



Chicken and Vegetable Saute

4 servings


  • 1 oz. pancetta, diced
  • 8 skinless, boneless chicken thighs or breasts or a combination
  • 1 teaspoon dried Italian seasoning
  • Salt & pepper to taste
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/2 cup chicken broth
  • 1 pound asparagus spears, trimmed and cut into two-inch pieces
  • 1 small yellow summer squash, halved crosswise and cut in 1/2-inch strips
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 4 green onions, sliced



In a 12-inch skillet brown chicken and pancetta in olive oil over medium-high heat, turning chicken to brown evenly. Add garlic, asparagus and squash. Sprinkle chicken and vegetables with Italian seasoning, salt and pepper. Saute for 5 minutes.

Carefully add broth; cover and cook 10 minutes or until chicken is tender and no longer pink (165 degrees F) and vegetables are tender. Transfer mixture to a serving platter and top with sliced green onions.


My favorite seafood market on the Gulf Coast.

My favorite seafood market on the Gulf Coast.

It’s a great time of year to enjoy some fresh seafood. Whether you buy it fresh from the counter at your favorite market, catch your own or buy it frozen, seafood is a great addition to your summer menu. Make salad your main course by adding some grilled fish to it. Include lots of leafy greens (choose from spinach, arugula, romaine or mixed baby greens) and add tomatoes, bell peppers, cucumber and diced onion. Top your salad with a tasty homemade dressing.


Italian Marinated Seafood Salad

Serves 6


  • 3/4 pound sea scallops
  • 1/2 pound medium unpeeled shrimp
  • 1/2 pound fresh mussels
  • 1/4 pound calamari rings
  • 1/2 cup pitted kalamata olives
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 1 large clove garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh chives
  • 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1 lemon, sliced
  • 1 medium red onion, thinly sliced
  • 6 cups mixed salad greens
  • Freshly ground pepper and salt to taste


Bring a large pot of water to boiling. Add scallops, shrimp, mussels and calamari to the boiling water and cook for 2 minutes. Drain.

Peel the shrimp and remove the mussels from their shells.

Place cooked seafood and olives in a large bowl and toss with the lemon juice, olive oil, garlic, parsley, chives and red pepper flakes. Chill for 1 hour.

Divide salad greens onto 6 plates or salad bowls. Spoon seafood over greens. Garnish with slices of lemon and red onions. Season to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper.


Lentil Salad with Grilled Salmon

You can use canned salmon but for really good flavor, grill extra salmon one night so that you have leftovers for this salad.

6 servings


  • 1/3 cup lemon juice
  • 1/3 cup chopped fresh dill
  • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon Freshly ground pepper
  • 1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 medium red bell pepper, seeded and diced
  • 1 cup cucumber,seeds removed and diced
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped red onion
  • Two 15-ounce cans lentils, rinsed, or 3 cups cooked brown or green lentils (see cooking note below)
  • 12 oz leftover grilled salmon fillet or 1 ½ cups flaked canned salmon


Whisk lemon juice, dill, mustard, salt and pepper in a large serving bowl. Gradually whisk in the oil. Add bell pepper, cucumber, onion, lentils  toss to coat. Let marinate for at least one hour or chill until ready to serve. Place leftover chilled salmon on top of the salad or flake and mix in with the lentils just before serving.

Cooking Note:

To cook the lentils: Place in a saucepan, cover with water and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and cook until just tender, about 20 minutes for green lentils and 30 minutes for brown. Drain and rinse under cold water.


Mediterranean Salad with Sardines

4 servings


  • 3 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 2 teaspoons dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 3 medium ripe tomatoes, cut into large chunks
  • 1 large cucumber, cut into large chunks
  • One 15-ounce can chickpeas, rinsed
  • 1/3 cup crumbled feta cheese
  • 1/4 cup thinly sliced red onion
  • 2 tablespoons sliced Kalamata olives
  • Two 4-ounce cans sardines with bones, packed in olive oil and drained (see cooking note below)


Whisk lemon juice, oil, garlic, oregano and pepper in a large serving bowl until well combined. Add tomatoes, cucumber, chickpeas, feta, onion and olives; gently toss to combine. Let marinate for at least an hour.

At serving time, divide the salad among 4 plates and top with sardines.

Cooking Note:

Look for sardines with skin and bones (which are edible) as they have more than four times the amount of calcium as skinless, boneless sardines. If you’re lucky enough to have fresh sardines available in your market, try them in place of the canned sardines. Lightly dredge them in salt-and-pepper-seasoned flour and sauté them in a little olive oil.


Grilled Fish Fillet Salad

6 servings



  • 1 medium clove garlic
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 5 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • ½ cup fresh orange juice
  • 1/4 cup white-wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard


  • 1 1/2 pounds red potatoes (5-6 medium), scrubbed and halved
  • 1 1/4 pounds green beans, trimmed
  • Juice of 1 large lemon
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 pound halibut or striped bass or your favorite fish fillet (see cooking note below)
  • 1/4 teaspoon coarsely ground pepper
  • 1 large head tender lettuce
  • 1 1/2 cups grape tomatoes
  • 3 hard-boiled eggs peeled and cut into wedges
  • 1/4 cup sliced pitted  Kalamata olives
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped fresh parsley


To prepare the vinaigrette:

Using a fork, mash the garlic with 1/4 teaspoon salt in a small bowl to form a coarse paste. Whisk in 5 tablespoons oil. Add 6 tablespoons orange juice, vinegar and mustard; whisk until well blended. Taste and season with more salt, if desired. Set aside at room temperature.

To prepare the salad:

Cook potatoes in boiling salted water until tender, 10 to 15 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon to a colander. When cool enough to handle, slice and place in a shallow bowl. Drizzle with 1/3 cup vinaigrette; set aside.

Add beans to the saucepan and  bring to a boil; cook until the beans are bright green and just tender, 4 to 6 minutes. Drain well. Place in a medium bowl and toss with 2 tablespoons vinaigrette.

Combine lemon juice, 2 tablespoons oil, salt and pepper in a sturdy ziplock plastic bag; shake until the salt dissolves. Add fish and marinate for up to 20 minutes.

Heat a grill to medium-high and preheat for 10 minutes, then reduce heat to medium. (For a charcoal grill, wait until the flames subside and only coals and some ash remain—flames will cause the oil on the fish to burn.) Oil grill rack.

Grill the fish, turning once, until browned and just cooked through, 4 to 5 minutes per side for halibut; 3 to 4 minutes per side for bass.

Arrange lettuce leaves on a large serving platter. Arrange the fish (whole or flaked into large chunks), potatoes, green beans and tomatoes on top. Drizzle with the remaining vinaigrette. Garnish with eggs, olives, parsley and pepper to taste.

Cooking Note:

Fish that flakes easily requires a delicate touch to flip on the grill. If you want to skip turning it over when grilling, measure a piece of foil large enough to hold the fish and coat it with cooking spray. Grill the fish on the foil (without turning) until it flakes easily and reaches an internal temperature of 145°F.


Shrimp & Arugula Salad

Grill extra corn to use in this salad.

4 servings


  • 12 cups loosely packed arugula leaves
  • 2 cups loosely packed fresh basil leaves, torn if large
  • 1 1/2 cups leftover grilled fresh corn kernels, (from about 2 ears)
  • 1 1/2 cups cherry or grape tomatoes, halved
  • 4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons grainy mustard
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, divided
  • 1 pound raw shrimp, (21-25 per pound), peeled and deveined, tails removed if desired
  • Homemade croutons made ahead and cooled, (see recipe below)
  • Freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • 1/2 cup Asiago or Parmesan cheese, shaved


Sprinkle shrimp with 1/4 teaspoon salt. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add the shrimp and cook, turning from time to time, just until they turn pink and are opaque in the center, about 3 minutes. chill in the refrigerator.

Combine arugula, basil, corn and tomatoes in a large salad bowl.

Whisk 3 tablespoons oil, lemon juice, vinegar, mustard and 1/4 teaspoon salt in a small bowl.

Add to the arugula mixture along with the croutons.

Whisk the dressing again and drizzle over the salad; toss to coat. Divide the salad among 4 plates. Grind black pepper over the salads and sprinkle with cheese.

Homemade Croutons


  • 3 pieces of good quality Italian bread, cut into 1-inch cubes (about 3 cups)
  • 1 teaspoon dried Italian seasoning
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil


Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

On a large baking sheet, spread out the bread cubes in one layer.

Evenly sprinkle the Italian seasoning, garlic powder and salt over the bread cubes.

Then drizzle the olive oil over the top.

Using your hands, toss to combine thoroughly and then spread back into one even layer.

Bake for 14 to 16 minutes or until golden brown. The croutons will harden as they cool.



Thinking of grilling fish this weekend? Certain types of fish are trickier than others, but almost any type of seafood can be grilled — shellfish, whole fish, steaks and fillets. Meaty fish are ideal for grilling because they hold together well and are easy to handle. For salmon, use lower heat because salmon has a high fat content and the fat will melt and cause flare-ups if the heat is too high.

Delicate, flaky fish pose more of a challenge on the grill because they fall apart easily. A grill basket solves that problem because it encloses the fish on both sides. Just be sure to oil the grill basket or spray with nonstick spray to prevent the fish from sticking. If you do not have a basket, you can use a wide metal spatula for turning the fish.

Be sure to oil the grill grates well. Grilling times and temperatures will vary depending on the type of fish, its density or flakiness and its thickness. Meaty, dense fish (tuna, wahoo, mahi mahi, swordfish) will take longer to cook than lighter, flakier fish (cod, halibut). Start by cooking the fish over high heat, but if the fish is browning too fast, lower the heat to medium-high.


Grilled Shrimp Pitas

6 servings


  • 1 cup plain Greek yogurt
  • 4 ounces feta cheese, crumbled
  • 1/2 cucumber, peeled, halved and thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh mint
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh oregano
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 1/2 pounds large shrimp, shelled and deveined
  • 6 pitas, about 6-inch diameter
  • 3 cups lettuce
  • Sliced red onion and plum tomatoes


For the Sauce

In a medium-size bowl, stir together yogurt, crumbled feta, cucumber and lemon juice. Cover and refrigerate until ready to use.

For the Shrimp

Combine olive oil, lemon juice, mint, oregano, garlic, salt and pepper in a large resealable plastic bag. Add shrimp, seal bag and shake to coat shrimp with marinade. Refrigerate for 15 minutes.

Heat gas grill to medium-high or prepare a charcoal grill with medium-hot coals. Lightly coat the grill rack with oil or nonstick cooking spray. Place shrimp in a grilling basket and grill for 3 minutes. Baste once with the remaining marinade. Turn shrimp and grill for an additional 2 to 3 minutes or until shrimp turn pink.

To serve, equally divide the lettuce, sauce and shrimp over each pita. Add onion and tomato.


Grilled Hazelnut Salmon

4 servings


  • 4 six-ounce skinless salmon fillets, about 1 inch thick
  • 1 tablespoon hazelnut oil
  • 1/3 cup finely ground hazelnuts
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, divided
  • 1/3 cup white balsamic vinegar
  • 1/4 cup hazelnut oil
  • 2 ½ cups arugula
  • 1 cup yellow or red tiny pear-shape or grape tomatoes, halved
  • 2 ounces Brie cheese, cubed
  • 3 tablespoons finely chopped chives


Rinse fish and pat dry with paper towels. Brush one side of the  fillets evenly with the 1 tablespoon hazelnut oil. In a 9-inch pie plate stir together ground hazelnuts, flour and 1/4 teaspoon of the salt. Dip the oil brushed side of the salmon in the nut mixture; coat well.

For a charcoal grill, arrange medium-hot coals around a drip pan. Place fish, coated sides up, on the greased grill rack over the pan. Cover and grill for 14 to 18 minutes or until fish begins to flake when tested with a fork. (For a gas grill, preheat grill. Reduce heat to medium. Adjust for indirect cooking. Place fish, coated sides up, on greased grill rack over the burner that is turned off. Grill as directed.)

For the dressing

In a small bowl combine vinegar and the remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt; whisk in the 1/4 cup hazelnut oil. Reserve 1/4 cup of the dressing; set aside. In a large bowl toss arugula, tomatoes, cheese and chives with the remaining dressing. Divide evenly among serving plates.

Add a grilled salmon fillet to each plate. Drizzle salmon with reserved dressing.


Tuna with Fruit Salsa

4 servings


  • Four 5 ounce tuna steaks, 1-inch thick
  • 2 fresh ripe peaches, halved and pitted
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • Salt and cracked black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons apricot preserves
  • 1 tablespoon vinegar
  • 1/2 cup fresh raspberries
  • 3 green onions, thinly sliced


Lightly brush tuna steaks and peach halves with olive oil; sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Heat grill and oil the grates.

Grill tuna and peaches over medium-high heat for 5 minutes. Remove peaches; set aside to cool. Coarsely chop peaches.

Turn tuna and cook 6 to 7 minutes more or until it flakes easily when tested with a fork. Transfer tuna to a platter; cover to keep warm.

In a medium microwave-safe bowl heat apricot preserves on 100 percent power (high) for 15 seconds. Stir in vinegar; gently fold in raspberries and chopped peaches.

Serve fruit salsa with tuna steaks and sprinkle with green onions.


Mustard-Glazed Halibut Steaks

Save time and grill a vegetable or two alongside the fish.

4 servings


  • Four 4-5 ounce halibut (or any white fish) steaks, cut 1 inch thick
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 2 teaspoons finely snipped fresh basil


Pat fish dry with paper towels.

In small saucepan heat butter, lemon juice, mustard and basil over low heat until butter is melted. Brush both sides of the fish steaks with the mustard mixture.

For a gas grill: cook fish steaks on greased rack over medium for 8 to 12 minutes or just until fish begins to flake easily when tested with a fork, turning once and brushing occasionally with additional mustard mixture.

For a charcoal grill: arrange preheated coals around a drip pan in a covered grill. Heat to medium and place fish on the greased grill rack over the drip pan. Cover and grill for 8 to 12 minutes or just until fish begins to flake easily when tested with a fork, turning once and brushing occasionally with the mustard mixture.


Grilled Scallops With Salsa Verde

Choose scallops that are “dry” (not stored in liquid preservatives). Large sea scallops are better for the grill; small bay scallops could overcook before browning or fall through the grates. Make sure to coat them thoroughly in an oil based marinade before grilling, so they don’t stick to the grate.

Servings: 4


  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 12 large sea scallops, side muscle removed
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 metal skewers
  • Salsa Verde, recipe below


Prepare grill for medium-high heat; oil grate. Mix scallops with oil and season with salt and pepper. Thread scallops on 4 metal skewers and place them on the grill, flat side down. Grill, turning occasionally, until lightly charred and just cooked through, about 2 minutes per side. Serve scallops with Salsa Verde.

Salsa Verde

This sauce is delicious with shellfish.


Makes About 1 Cup

  • Half a lemon, zested and juiced
  • 1 small shallot, finely chopped
  • 1 garlic clove, finely chopped
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 3/4 cup finely chopped fresh parsley
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped fresh basil
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh chives


Squeeze juice from the half lemon after the peel is removed and set aside. Combine the lemon zest, shallot and garlic in a medium bowl; season with salt and pepper. Let sit 5 minutes. Add oil, parsley, basil and chives. Stir in reserved lemon juice.


Whether you are grilling vegetables, seafood, beef, pork or poultry, use these healthy cooking tips to add flavor–but not fat–to your next cookout. Grilling is one of the healthiest cooking methods available because it sears in flavor while the fat drips away. The BBQ’s smokiness adds calorie-free flavor and you can add more flavor to grilled foods in other ways, also. Choose fresh and flavorful ingredients that have taste without adding fat or sodium. Here are some of my suggestions:

1. When choosing marinades, look out for high proportions of oil, which can add fat without contributing flavor. Rely on marinades that use juices and vinegar for acid. And opt for recipes that flavor with fresh or low-sodium ingredients.


For Grilled Chicken

Lemon-Thyme Marinade: In a small bowl, combine 1/4 cup finely chopped parsley; 1/4 cup lemon juice; 1/4 cup olive oil; 1 tablespoon snipped fresh thyme or 1 teaspoon dried thyme, crushed; 2 teaspoons snipped fresh marjoram or 1/2 teaspoon dried marjoram, crushed; 2 cloves garlic, minced; 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper and 1/8 teaspoon salt.

Place 1 1/4 pounds boneless chicken breasts in a resealable plastic bag set in a shallow dish. Pour the marinade into the bag with the chicken; seal the bag. Marinate in the refrigerator for at least 2 hours or up to 4 hours, turning bag occasionally. Drain chicken; reserve marinade.

Tip: Make extra marinade and marinate some of your favorite vegetables to grill alongside the chicken.

Place chicken on an oiled grill and cook for 15 to 18 minutes or until chicken is no longer pink (165 degrees F), turning once and brushing with reserved marinade once halfway through grilling. Discard leftover marinade. Makes 4 servings.


For Grilled Flank Steak

Rosemary-Onion Marinade: In a small bowl, combine 1/4 cup chopped onion; 1/4 cup olive oil; 1/4 cup white wine vinegar; 1 tablespoon snipped fresh rosemary or 1 teaspoon dried rosemary, crushed; 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper and 1/8 teaspoon salt.

Trim fat from one flank steak. Score both sides of the steak in a diamond pattern by making shallow diagonal cuts at 1-inch intervals. Place steak in a resealable plastic bag. Pour the marinade over steak in the bag.  Seal bag; turn to coat steak. Marinate in the refrigerator for 30 minutes. Drain and discard the marinade.

Preheat grill and reduce heat to medium. Oil the grates and cook the steak about 15 minutes. Grilled corn and red bell peppers go well with this steak and you can use leftovers to make a salad for the next day.


For Grilled Fish

Garlic Marinade: In a blender or processor combine 6 garlic cloves, peeled and quartered, 1/2 onion, quartered,  1/2 red sweet pepper, quartered and seeded, 1/4 cup dry white wine, 2 tablespoons olive oil,  2 tablespoons ketchup, 2 teaspoons sweet paprika, 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper until coarsely chopped. Stir in ¼ cup slivered fresh basil leaves.

Transfer half of the marinade to a small bowl; cover and chill until ready to serve.

Place 1 1/2 pounds fresh fish steaks or fillets (such as tuna, sea bass, swordfish or salmon), cut 1 inch thick in a shallow glass dish. Spoon remaining marinade over fish; turn fish to coat. Cover and marinate in the refrigerator for 2 to 4 hours, turning fish occasionally.

Drain fish, discarding marinade in the dish. Grill fish in an oiled grill basket over medium for 8 to 12 minutes or until fish flakes easily with a fork. Gently turn the basket once halfway through the  grilling time. Serve fish with the reserved marinade. Makes 4-6 servings.

2. Wood chunks or chips infuse meat with flavor without adding calories. You can choose from mesquite, alder, maple, cedar, nut woods (such as hickory and pecan) or fruit woods (such as cherry and apple). Soak them first in water for an hour, then drain and sprinkle directly onto the coals (for gas or electric grills, put the wood in a smoker box or heavy-duty foil). If you’re grilling longer than an hour, plan to add more wood during cooking.


Apple-Smoked Pork Loin

8 servings


  • 3 cups apple wood chips or 6 to 8 apple wood chunks
  • One 2 – 2 1/2 pound boneless pork top loin roast (single loin)
  • 2 teaspoons dried oregano, crushed
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper


At least 1 hour before cooking, soak wood chips or chunks in enough water to cover.

Trim fat from the roast. Place roast in a shallow dish. In a small bowl, stir together dried oregano, garlic, salt and pepper. Sprinkle evenly over all sides of the roast; rub in with your fingers.

Drain wood chips. Prepare grill for indirect grilling over medium-low heat. For a charcoal grill use a drip pan. Sprinkle half of the drained wood chips over the coals. For a gas grill place the chips in a smoker box or in heavy-duty foil.

Place roast on the grill rack on the indirect side of the grill. Cover and grill for 1 to 1-1/2 hours or until internal temperature registers 145 degrees F on an instant-read thermometer. Add more wood chips as needed during grilling. Remove roast from grill. Cover with foil; let stand for 15 minutes before slicing.

3. Glazes are brushed onto meat near the end of cooking to add flavor. Look for glazes that rely on low sugar jellies or preserves. Here is a simple recipe to make.


Fruit Glaze

Brush on chicken, salmon or pork during the last 5 minutes of grilling time.


  • 2/3 cup low-sugar fruit preserves (such as apricot, berry or peach)
  • 1/4 cup pineapple juice
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom


Place fruit preserves in a small saucepan; snip any large pieces of fruit. Stir in pineapple juice, lemon juice and cardamom. Bring to boiling; reduce heat. Simmer, uncovered, for 15 minutes. Cool about 10 minutes (glaze will thicken as it cools). Makes about 3/4 cup.

For Grilled Salmon

Rinse 1 lb of salmon and pat dry with paper towels. Cut into 4 equal pieces and measure thickness of the salmon. Sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Place salmon on oiled grill rack or in an oiled fish basket over medium heat. Grill 4-6 minutes per 1/2-inch thickness or until fish flakes easily when tested with a fork, turning once halfway through grilling. Brush with fruit glaze during the last minute or two of cooking time.

4. Seasonings that are rubbed directly onto the meat’s surface are excellent, low-fat ways to flavor grilled foods. Look for rubs with salt-free seasonings. To use a rub, sprinkle the mixture evenly over the meat. Next, rub the mixture into the meat with your fingertips.


Garlic Herb Rub


  • 1 tablespoon dried basil, crushed
  • 1 tablespoon dried thyme, crushed
  • 1 tablespoon dried marjoram, crushed
  • 1 tablespoon finely shredded lemon peel or dried lemon peel
  • 1 tablespoon garlic powder
  • 2 teaspoons dried sage, crushed
  • 2 teaspoons fennel seeds, crushed
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper


In a small bowl, combine all ingredients. Rub about 1 tablespoon of the herb mixture on 1 pound of meat and cook as desired.

If using fresh lemon peel, store rub in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 1 week or freeze for up to 1 month. If using dried lemon peel, store in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 6 months.

Grilled Lamb Chops

Trim fat from 6 lamb chops, cut 1 inch thick. Place the chops on a plate. Sprinkle garlic herb mixture evenly over chops; rub in with your fingers. Cover the chops with plastic wrap and marinate in the refrigerator at least 30 minutes or up to 24 hours.

Grill chops on an oiled grill on medium until chops are cooked to your likeness. (Allow 10 to 14 minutes for medium-rare and 14 to 16 minutes for medium.) Let rest 5 minutes before serving.


Roughly 90 percent of U.S. potatoes are planted in the spring and harvested in the fall. The marketing season for fall potatoes begins in August (for areas of early harvest) and may continue through to the following August. Unlike most produce crops, which are perishable, potatoes are well-suited for long-term storage in climate-controlled rooms or containers.

Potatoes harvested in the winter, spring and summer account for less than 10 percent of the U.S. potato production. However, these potatoes meet specific market needs and generally cost more than fall potatoes. For example, some consumers prefer “new” or “freshly dug” potatoes, such as round red, white, yellow and purple varieties that are smaller in size and are normally not stored before sale.

Any variety of potato that is harvested early is considered a new potato. Since they are picked before their sugars have converted to starch, new potatoes are crisp and waxy and high in moisture. They also have thin skins, making them great for cooking and eating unpeeled. New potatoes are in season in spring and early summer and they should be firm, smooth and free of cracks or soft brown spots. Choose potatoes of similar size so they cook evenly.

Store potatoes in a cool, well ventilated place. Temperatures lower than 50 degrees, such as in the refrigerator, cause a potato’s starch to convert to sugar, resulting in a sweet taste and discoloration when cooked.  If you do refrigerate, letting the potato warm gradually to room temperature before cooking can reduce the discoloration. Avoid areas that reach high temperatures (beneath the sink or beside large appliances) or receive too much sunlight (on the counter-top).

Perforated plastic bags and paper bags offer the best environment for extending a potato’s shelf-life. Don’t wash potatoes before storing them, as dampness promotes early spoilage.

For Breakfast or Lunch


Potato and Vegetable Frittata


  • 1 lb medium new potatoes
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 red bell pepper, seeded, and thinly sliced
  • 1 small yellow onion, thinly sliced
  • Small bag of fresh baby spinach
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 2 tablespoons thinly sliced basil
  • 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 8 eggs, beaten


Boil potatoes in a saucepan, covered, until tender. Drain and when cool enough, cut into thin slices..

Heat an oven broiler.

Heat oil in an ovenproof 12 inch nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Cook garlic, red pepper and onion until soft, 3–4 minutes. Add spinach; cook until wilted, about 1 minute. Stir in sliced potatoes, salt and pepper.

Stir in half the basil, the Parmesan cheese and the eggs and reduce heat to medium; cook until golden on the bottom, 8–10 minutes. Place the pan under the broiler. Broil until set and golden on top, about 3 minutes. Garnish with remaining basil.

As An Appetizer


Roasted Potatoes with Ricotta


  • 1 1/2 pounds small new potatoes
  • 1 teaspoon plus 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • Coarse salt and ground pepper
  • 1/2 cup ricotta
  • 2 tablespoons finely grated Parmesan
  • Zest from 1/2 lemon, finely grated


Preheat oven to 450 degrees F. Place potatoes in the center of a 3-foot-long piece of foil. Drizzle with 1 teaspoon olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Bring the long sides of the foil together and fold edges over, then tightly crimp the ends to create a packet. Roast on a baking sheet until cooked through, 35 to 40 minutes.

In a small bowl, combine ricotta, Parmesan and lemon zest; season with salt and pepper. When the potatoes are cool enough to handle, cut a small X on top of each with a paring knife and gently squeeze open. Place 1 teaspoon ricotta mixture into each. Drizzle 1 tablespoon olive oil over the stuffed potatoes on a serving platter

In A Soup


Italian Fish and Potato Soup

Serves 6


  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 onion, small dice
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 celery stalks, small dice
  • 2 new red potatoes, diced
  • 2 new white potatoes, diced
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • Pinch salt and pepper
  • One 28 oz can Italian diced tomatoes
  • One 8 oz bottle clam juice
  • 4 cups water
  • Juice from 1 large lemon
  • 1 1/2 lbs fresh or frozen cod-fish (or any other firm white fish), cut in 1 inch pieces
  • 1/2 cup roughly chopped Italian green and Kalamata olives
  • Additional salt and pepper, to taste

In a large soup pot, heat oil and add onion, garlic, celery and potatoes. Season with thyme, oregano, salt and pepper. Sauté for about 10 minutes until slightly softened. Add tomatoes, clam juice, lemon juice and water. Bring to a boil and then let simmer for about 20 minutes or until the potatoes are soft.

Add the fish and olives to the soup and gently stir. Continue to cook for another 15-20 minutes until the fish is cooked through. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust accordingly.

In A Salad


Arugula with Roasted Salmon and New Potatoes

4 servings


  • 1 pound red or yellow new potatoes, quartered
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • Coarse salt and ground pepper
  • 1 pound skinless salmon fillet
  • 3 tablespoons white-wine vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • 1/4 cup snipped chives
  • 10 ounces baby arugula


Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F. On a large rimmed baking pan, toss potatoes with 1 tablespoon oil; season with salt and pepper. Roast 10 minutes.

Toss potatoes and push to the sides of the baking pan; place salmon in the center and season with salt and pepper.

Roast until potatoes are tender and the salmon is opaque throughout, about 15 minutes. Transfer salmon to a plate; break into large pieces with a fork.

Whisk together vinegar, mustard, chives and remaining 2 tablespoons oil in a large bowl; season with salt and pepper.

Add arugula and potatoes; toss to combine. Top salad with salmon pieces and serve.

In A Pasta


Pasta with Pesto, Potatoes and Green Beans

4-6 servings


  • 2 medium new potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 1 tablespoon salt, plus more for seasoning
  • 8 ounces cavatappi pasta
  • 8 ounces green beans, trimmed and halved
  • 1/2 cup homemade basil pesto or store-bought
  • Fresh ground black pepper


Place the potatoes in a large pot of water; bring to a boil.

Add salt and cavatappi or other short tubular pasta; return to a boil; cook 2 minutes.

Add green beans. Return to a boil; cook until vegetables are tender and pasta is al dente, about 6 minutes.

Drain reserving ½ cup of the pasta cooking water.

Toss pasta and vegetables with the pesto and thin with some of the pasta cooking water. Garnish with fresh black  pepper.

In A Main Course


Roast Beef with New Potatoes and Shallots

Serves 4


  • 1 1/2 pounds small red new potatoes (10 to 12), well scrubbed, halved or quartered
  • 1 pound shallots (8 to 10), peeled, ends trimmed and halved lengthwise
  • 1 teaspoon dried Italian seasoning
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • Coarse salt and ground pepper
  • 1 1/2 pounds eye-of-round beef roast, tied


Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. On a large rimmed baking pan, toss potatoes and shallots with the oil; sprinkle on the Italian seasoning and add salt and pepper to taste.

Push vegetables to the edges of the baking pan; place roast in the center. Turn roast to coat with oil on the pan and season generously with salt and pepper.

Roast, tossing potatoes and shallots occasionally, until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the center of the meat registers 130 degrees F for medium-rare, 40 to 50 minutes.

Let the beef rest 10 minutes, loosely covered with aluminum foil, before slicing and serving with the potatoes and shallots.

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Lovely Delight Bite

For delicious moments......Find out about my secret special treats for yourself, family and friends

Poem and Dish

Poetry and Food Lover's Site...


Adventures of Bacon and Friends

Shivaay Delights

Sharing my passion for cooking and baking ♡

Splendid Recipes and More

Food That Satisfies Your Palate

Andrews' Family Cookery & Household Management

Households that create happiness, and Foods that celebrate life

Back Road Journal

Little treasures discovered while exploring the back roads of life

Tuscas värld

Smaker, dofter och gömställen kring Medelhavet

Il mondo di Macdelice di Maria Cavallaro

Pensieri e briciole di vita

Good Food Everyday

From the heart of the Mediterranean ....

The Good, the Bad and the Italian

food/films/families and more

LOVE-the secret ingredient

Like to cook? Like to eat? Be a part of the conversation.

An eye for food

Food is to be admired as well as desired. It should speak to you visually and make you want to taste it!

Things My Belly Likes

Where eating to live and living to eat are not mutually exclusive

Our Growing Paynes

A journey about gardening, cooking, and knitting.

gotta get baked

musings of a baking fiend


Let's talk recipes, great food and FITNESS!

on the road with Animalcouriers

pet transport through Europe and beyond

jittery cook

recipes worth sharing


vibrant inspiring nourishing yoga


site for Patricia Mitchell, author

Something Sweet Something Savoury

Family friendly recipes from a chaotic kitchen

Simply Sophisticated Cooking

Meals from the Road

FARMINISTA'S FEAST with Karen Pavone

Farm to Table Adventures in California's Beautiful Bay Area

Blue Heron Writes

Sharing to Inspire through Words and Pictures


Healthy Italian Cooking at Home


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