The most commonly sung song on New Year’s eve, “Auld Lang Syne” is an old Scottish song that was first published by the poet, Robert Burns, in the 1796 edition of the book, Scots Musical Museum. Burns transcribed it (and made some refinements to the lyrics) after he heard it sung by an old man from the Ayrshire area of Scotland, Burns’s homeland.

But it was bandleader Guy Lombardo, who popularized the song and turned it into a New Year’s tradition. Lombardo first heard “Auld Lang Syne” in his hometown of London, Ontario, where it was sung by Scottish immigrants. When he and his brothers formed the famous dance band, Guy Lombardo and His Royal Canadians, the song became one of their standards. Lombardo played the song at midnight at a New Year’s eve party at the Roosevelt Hotel in New York City in 1929 and a tradition was born. After that, Lombardo’s version of the song was played every New Year’s eve from the 1930s until 1976 at the Waldorf Astoria. In the first years it was broadcast on radio, and then on television. The song became such a New Year’s tradition that Life magazine wrote, “if Lombardo failed to play Auld Lang Syne, the American public would not believe that the new year had really arrived.”

Probably the most famous tradition in the United States is the dropping of the New Year ball in Times Square, New York City. Thousands gather to watch the ball make its one-minute descent, arriving exactly at midnight. The tradition first began in 1907. The original ball was made of iron and wood; the current ball is made of Waterford Crystal, weighs 1,070 pounds and is six feet in diameter.

A traditional southern New Year’s dish is Hoppin’ John—black eyed peas and ham hocks. An old saying goes, “Eat peas on New Year’s day to have plenty of everything the rest of the year.”

Another American tradition is the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California. The Tournament of Roses parade that precedes the football game on New Year’s day is made up of elaborate and inventive floats. The first parade was held in 1886.

A common symbol of New Year’s is the Baby New Year. This is often a white male baby dressed in a diaper, a hat and a sash. The year he represents is printed on his sash. According to mythology, Baby New Year grows up and ages in a single year. At the end of the year he is an old man and hands his role over to the next Baby New Year. Other symbols of New Year’s are spectacular fireworks exploding over landmarks and clocks striking midnight as the year begins.

Entertain At Home

Invite a few close friends to ring in the New Year with an easy, intimate party at home. Champagne is the classic New Year’s Eve beverage, but this year you can change things up by making fruity cocktails with that bottle of bubbly

The wonderful wafer-thin pancakes, called crepes, fill a niche in contemporary dining. Made with light sauces and fillings, they suit today’s desire for healthy fare. Crepe refers both to the individual pancake and the filled creation. Fast to assemble and filled by a variety of savory fillings – fresh vegetables and herbs, seafood, poultry, and meat crepes can serve as appetizers, first courses, and entrées. Filled with seasonal fruit, souffles, sauces, sorbets, or ice cream, they become sumptuous desserts.

Crepes are ideal to make ahead, refrigerate or freeze and fill later for a party or informal gathering. They are easy, dramatic, and fun to serve. They can be prepared early on the day of the party or let guests spoon on their own fillings.

 

Basic Crepe Recipe

  • 1 1/2 cups whole milk
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 6 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • Oil for the pan

Cooking Instructions for the Crepes:

1. Whisk together the flour and salt in a medium-sized bowl.

2. Make a well in the center of the mixture and pour in the milk and water. Whisk the milk and water into the flour mixture until the batter is smooth and well blended.

3. Whisk in the eggs and melted butter until blended.

4. Strain the batter through a sieve into another medium-sized bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 2 hours to give the batter time to rest.

5. Heat an 8-inch nonstick skillet or crepe pan over medium heat. Lightly brush the pan with olive oil.

6. Ladle about 1/4 cup of the batter into the skillet and tilt the pan in all directions to evenly coat the bottom.

 

 

7. Cook the crepes for about 30 seconds or until the bottom is lightly brown. Loosen the edges with a spatula and flip the crepe over.

 

8. Cook the underside for 10 to 15 seconds or until it is set, dry and browned in spots.

 

9. Slide the crepe onto a flat plate and cover with a piece of wax paper.

 

10. Repeat with the remaining batter, brushing the pan with more oil as needed, and stacking the crepes between wax paper. The crepes may be made up to 3 days ahead. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate. Bring to room temperature before using.

Smoked Salmon and Cream Cheese Crepes

Servings: 8

Crepes

Filling                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

  • 8 ounces cream cheese, softened
  • 2 tablespoons lemon zest
  • 1 medium shallot, minced
  • 1/4 cup capers, rinsed and chopped
  • 1 tablespoon minced dill
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • Freshly ground pepper
  • 1/2 pound sliced smoked salmon

Salad

  • 3 cups baby spinach (3 ounces)
  • 1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar
  • 2 plum tomatoes, thinly sliced and quartered

Directions:

Make crepes and set aside.

In a bowl blend the cream cheese, lemon zest, shallot, capers, dill and salt and season with pepper.

Fold each crepe in half. Spread about 2 tablespoons of the cream cheese mixture vertically down the center of each crepe. Lay the salmon over the cream cheese. Fold one side of the crepe over the filling, roll to close and serve.

In a medium bowl, toss the spinach with the olive oil and balsamic vinegar and add in the tomatoes. Season with salt and pepper. Serve on the side of the salmon crepes.

Mushroom, Spinach & Cheese Crepes

Yield: 12 crepes

Ingredients

Crepes

  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 1/4 lbs mushrooms, rinsed, trimmed and thinly sliced ( about 8 cups of any combination of white button, shiitake, oyster, portobello, chanterelles or whate)
  • 1/4 cup fresh flat-leaf parsley, finely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves
  • 1 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • salt & pepper, to taste
  • 1 (10 ounce) packages fresh spinach, washed, stemmed and coarsely chopped
  • 5 ounces cream cheese, cut into small cubes
  • 2 cups mozzarella cheese, shredded

Directions

Make crepes and set aside.

Preheat oven to 350°F.

Heat the oil in a large skillet. Add the mushrooms all at once and cook, stirring, over medium-high heat until they begin to brown. About 10 minutes.

Stir in the parsley, thyme, garlic, salt & pepper. Cook for 1 minute.

Reduce heat to medium and stir in the spinach. Cover & cook until just wilted, about 2 minutes.

Uncover & add the cream cheese, stirring until melted.

Spoon mixture down the center of each crepe. Roll up crepes and arrange side by side in a 13×9 baking dish. Sprinkle with mozzarella cheese.

Cover pan with foil and heat until cheese melts, about 15 minutes.

Serve warm with sliced tomatoes and red onions.

Ham and Asparagus Crepes with Parmesan Cheese                                                                               

Make crepes and set aside.

Ingredients

Filling

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 to 1 1/2 cups diced or thinly sliced ham
  • 18 to 24 spears of asparagus
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Sauce

  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped onion
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped red bell pepper, optional
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 1 1/2 cups milk
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 teaspoons fresh chopped parsley
  • 1 cup fresh shredded Parmesan cheese, or about 1/2 cup if finely grated
  • More Parmesan cheese for topping

Filling:

Cut ham into small dice or slice thinly.

Heat oven to 500° F.

Toss asparagus with olive oil to coat thoroughly. Arrange in a single layer in a shallow baking pan; roast for 10 minutes. Remove and let the spears cool.

Sauce:

In a medium saucepan, saute the onion in butter until tender. Add the garlic and chopped red bell pepper and saute for 1 minute longer. Stir in flour until blended. Gradually add the milk, stirring constantly. Add 1/2 teaspoon salt, the pepper, parsley, and the shredded Parmesan cheese. Continue cooking, stirring, until thickened.

Grease a 13 x 9-inch baking dish. Heat oven to 350° F.

Place a crepe on a plate. Arrange ham and 3 to 4 spears of asparagus on the center of the crepe. Spoon about 2 tablespoons of sauce over the ham and asparagus; roll up or fold as desired. Arrange in the prepared baking dish; pour remaining sauce over the filled crepes. Sprinkle with more shredded Parmesan cheese. Bake until hot and bubbly. Serve with tossed salad.

 

Champagne CocktailsClassic champagne cocktail

Classic Champagne Cocktail

Makes 1

Ingredients

  • 3 drops bitters
  • 1 sugar cube
  • 1 ounce Cognac
  • 4 ounces chilled Champagne

Directions

Drop bitters onto sugar cube; let soak in. Place sugar cube in a Champagne flute. Add Cognac, and top with Champagne.

Champagne Punch

Serves 6

Ingredients

  • 1 thinly sliced peach
  • 1 cup raspberries
  • 1 cup blueberries
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1/3 cup Simple Sugar Syrup, see recipe below
  • 1 bottle champagne or other sparkling white wine

Directions

In a pitcher, combine ice, peach, raspberries, blueberries, lemon juice, and simple syrup. Slowly pour in champagne or other sparkling white wine.

Simple Syrup

Ingredients:

  • 2 parts sugar
  • 1 part water

Bring the water to a boil.

Dissolve the sugar into the boiling water, stirring constantly.

Once the sugar is dissolved completely, remove the pan from the heat. (Note: Do not allow the syrup to boil for too long or the syrup will be too thick.)

Allow to cool completely and thicken, then bottle.

 

Lavender Champagne

Serves 16

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 tablespoon dried lavender
  • 4 bottles (750 mL) dry Champagne or sparkling wine, chilled
  • Fresh lavender sprigs, for garnish

Directions

Bring sugar and 1/2 cup water to a boil in a saucepan, stirring to dissolve sugar. Stir in dried lavender. Remove from heat. Let cool completely. Strain out lavender. Refrigerate syrup until ready to serve (up to 1 month).

Pour about 6 ounces Champagne and 1 1/2 teaspoons syrup into each flute. Garnish each with a lavender sprig.

Blood Orange Champagne Cocktail                                                                                                                     

Serves 10 to 12

Ingredients

  • 2 1/4 cups freshly squeezed or frozen blood-orange juice or regular orange juice
  • 2 750-ml bottles champagne, chilled

Directions

Pour 3 tablespoons juice in each champagne flute. Fill flutes with champagne, and serve.

 

Ginger Sparkler

Serves 8

Ingredients

  • 2 teaspoons finely grated peeled fresh ginger
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 bottle (750 ml) dry sparkling wine, such as Cava, Prosecco, or Champagne

Directions

Set a fine-mesh sieve over a small bowl; set aside. In a small saucepan, boil ginger, sugar, and 1/4 cup water until syrupy, about 2 minutes. Pour through sieve into bowl, discarding solids. (To store syrup, refrigerate in an airtight container, up to 1 week.)

Pour 1 tablespoon syrup into each of 8 tall glasses. Top with sparkling wine, and gently stir.

 

Do You know the lyrics?

Print it off for your guests.

“Auld Lang Syne”

 

For auld lang syne, my dear,

For auld lang syne,

We’ll tak a cup of kindness yet,

For auld lang syne!

 

And surely ye’ll be your pint-stowp,

And surely I’ll be mine,

And we’ll tak a cup o kindness yet,

For auld lang syne!

 

We twa hae run about the braes,

And pou’d the gowans fine,

But we’ve wander’d monie a weary fit,

Sin auld lang syne.

 

We twa hae paidl’d in the burn,

Frae morning sun till dine,

But seas between us braid hae roar’d

Sin auld lang syne.

 

And there’s a hand my trusty fiere,

And gie’s a hand o thine,

And we’ll tak a right guid-willie waught,

For auld lang syne.

 

 

 

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